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Mall victims include teen, probation officer, Boeing worker

SEATTLE (AP) Five people died in the shooting at a Macy’s store in a mall north of Seattle. Authorities do not plan to make their identities public until Tuesday, but details about three of the victims have been reported by Washington state media. Here’s what is known about them:

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SARAI LARA:

The 16-year-old high school sophomore was the youngest victim of the gunman who opened fire in department store in the small city of Burlington. Born in Mount Vernon just south of Burlington, Lara was described by her mother Evangelina as bright, all smiles and her mother’s “right hand” at home for the family. The teen survived cancer and was told by her doctor that she was doing well, Evangelina Lara told The Seattle Times( https://goo.gl/YMQvxk[1]) through a translator.

The family has Mexican roots, and Sarai Lara was proud of her heritage, her mother said. She had a wide network of friends at school and helped at home, caring for year 5-year-old sister.

“It’s not fair what happened to her,” Evangelina Lara said.

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CHUCK EAGAN:

Eagan was a longtime Boeing Co. maintenance worker from Lake Stevens, his aunt, Carol Thrush told ( http://bit.ly/2cYDJn0[2] ) The Seattle Times. She said Eagan and his wife were out for a dinner and shopping at the mall. They had made their way to Macy’s when the shooter opened fire. Thrush said Eagan and his wife ran, but his wife fell down as she was trying to get away. Eagan was shot as he helped his wife, Thrush said.

Thrush said Eagan had two daughters and three grandchildren.

He planned to retire from Boeing next year and hoped to travel.

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BELINDA GALDE:

Galde, 64, was a longtime probation officer with the Skagit County District Court.

The court in a statement described Galde as “an amazingly kind and caring individual who was much adored by her friends, her coworkers and the thousands of probationers who she helped find a better way to live.”

References

  1. ^ https://goo.gl/YMQvxk (goo.gl)
  2. ^ http://bit.ly/2cYDJn0 (bit.ly)

Protest goes peacefully outside Panthers game

Photo: Skip Foreman, AP

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Police officers stand outside Bank of America Stadium for an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Carolina Panthers, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Extra security was posted outside the stadium in response to protests over the shooting death of a black man by a police officer on Sept. 20. Joe Michel, 19, of Lawrenceville, N.J., takes a selfie with two Charlotte Mecklenburg Police officers outside Bank of America Stadium for an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and the Carolina Panthers, Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Extra security was posted outside the stadium in response to protests over the shooting death of a black man by a police officer on Sept. 20. A Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police officer stands guard outside Bank of America Stadium before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Increased security is in place for the game after five nights of protests over Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police officers stand guard outside Bank of America Stadium before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Increased security is in place for the game after five nights of protests over Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. North Carolina National Guard vehicles are parked in front of an entrance to Bank of America Stadium before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Increased security is in place for the game after five nights of protests over Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. North Carolina National Guard vehicles are parked in front of an entrance to Bank of America Stadium before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Increased security is in place for the game after five nights of protests over Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott. A police office walks a bomb-sniffing dog past an entrance to Bank of America Stadium before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Increased security is in place for the game after five nights of protests over Tuesday’s fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.

Carolina Panthers’ Cam Newton wears a shirt with a quote by Martin Luther King as he warms up before an NFL football game against the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Carolina Panthers’ Cam Newton wears a shirt with a quote by Martin Luther King as he warms up before an NFL football game against the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016.

Photo: Bob Leverone, AP

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Carolina Panthers fans hold a sign as they watch the teams warm up before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016. Carolina Panthers fans hold a sign as they watch the teams warm up before an NFL football game between the Carolina Panthers and the Minnesota Vikings in Charlotte, N.C., Sunday, Sept. 25, 2016.

Photo: Mike McCarn, AP

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Protest goes peacefully outside Panthers game

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) Chanting “No Justice! No Peace!” as they converged outside Bank of America Stadium, about 100 people peacefully demonstrated the fatal police shooting of a black man before the Carolina Panthers[15] game Sunday.

Nothing felt normal about what should have been a typical fall day of NFL football.

A heavy police presence surrounded the stadium, where officers in black riot gear stood side-by-side around the entrances. There had been concerns that a sixth day of protests over Tuesday night’s fatal shooting of Keith Scott[16] would disrupt the game, or prevent fans from entering the stadium.

Instead, it was quiet in the hours leading up to the game, as many fans stopped to hug officers and pose for pictures. Protesters didn’t gather until about an hour before kickoff, when the group used bullhorns and held signs in demonstration.

As kickoff neared, most of the protesters dropped to one knee when the national anthem played inside the stadium. Along the sideline inside the game, Carolina safety Marcus Ball[17] raised his fist during the national anthem.

Last month, San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick[18] started a protest movement by not standing during the national anthem. He has said he wants to draw attention to racial oppression and police brutality in the United States. Many athletes have since joined him or said they support him, even before the recent police shootings in Charlotte and Tulsa, Oklahoma.

As Sunday’s protest in Charlotte went on, fans heading for the stadium strolled by, many appearing to ignore the demonstrators. From inside the stadium, people stopped on access ramps on the upper level to watch the demonstrators.

The crowd inside was flat, the Panthers didn’t play well, and many fans didn’t return to their seats after halftime. Carolina lost its first home game since November, 2014, but coach Ron Rivera[19] said it was unfair to blame the unrest in Charlotte for the way the Panthers played.

“When we are here, we practice, we do the things we are supposed to do,” Rivera said. “What happened here (the shooting) was very tragic, and what we were hoping to do was be able to come out and put that aside.

“We just didn’t play very well. I am not looking for excuses. The tragedy is its own entity, and we have to respect that.”

Carolina linebacker Luke Kuechly[20] said the Panthers failed to bring unity to the Charlotte.

“You want to go out and win a game with what’s going on right now,” he said. “It was an opportunity for us to bring the community together, and add something positive. We wanted to win, as I’m sure everyone in Charlotte did.”

Outside the stadium, National Guard[21] troops rode by the protest in two Humvees, followed by an unmarked N.C. Highway Patrol car.

Many protesters held signs, others chanted Scott’s name. It coincided with the music of the Brass Connection Band, a group that plays outside the stadium prior to home games. The band on Sunday played Parliament’s “We Want The Funk,” as protesters slowed their chants to match the rhythm of the song.

The band’s drummer, Bill Banks[22], said he and his fellow musicians were just trying to use their talents to maintain calm.

“We’re just out here to lighten the mood,” Banks said. “I don’t have nothing against them protesting as long as it’s peaceful. We’re just trying to do our part.”

Moments later, a woman carrying a “free hugs” sign made her way through the crowd, hugging both the bicycle officers watching over the crowd and some of the protesters who were locked arm-in-arm.

“It doesn’t negate justice, accountability and equity,” said Dani Cook[23], who said she was self-employed, in reference to her hugs. “I can want to hug people. I can want to love people. I can also say there needs to be justice. There needs to be accountability. They’re not separate.”

Scott was killed Tuesday by a black police undercover police officer trying to serve a warrant on someone else. Police maintain that Scott had a gun, though residents have said he was unarmed.

In the dashboard camera video released Saturday night, Scott could be seen slowly backing away from his SUV with his hands down. Four shots are heard in quick succession, and he crumples to the ground mortally wounded.

After the police vehicle dashboard camera and police body-cam videos were released, protests continued but were largely peaceful.

City officials designated Sunday’s NFL game an “extraordinary event,” that gave officers the ability to search backpacks, coolers and anything else people might be carrying.

Meanwhile, Panthers quarterback Cam Newton[24] wore a T-shirt emblazoned with a quote by Martin Luther King[25] Jr. on the back as he warmed up for the game. The dark shirt read “Injustice Anywhere Is A Threat to Justice Everywhere.”

Newton earlier this week called Scott’s fatal shooting “embarrassing” and touched on a “state of oppression in our community.”

“My big thing is holding people accountable no matter what the race, no matter what the gender is, no matter what the age is,” the league MVP said. “I’m an African-American and I’m not happy how the justice has been dealt with over the years, and the state of oppression in our community, but we also as black people have to do right by ourselves. We can’t be hypocrites.”

References

  1. ^

Locals hope royal touch will help protect B.C.’s coast

Amidst hundreds of cameras, cheering fans, and security guards waiting to greet the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at a coast guard station in Vancouver on Sunday, a lone blue banner of protest waved above the crowds.

“Stop Kinder Morgan,” it read, referencing a major oilsands pipeline expansion proposal[1] that, if approved by Canada’s federal government later this year, would increase tanker traffic[2] in Vancouver’s waters by 600 per cent, increasing the risk of a catastrophic marine oil spill. Its carriers B.C. residents concerned about the health of their coastline hoped the presence of the royal couple would draw attention to their cause. And while Prince William and his wife, Kate, may not have grasped the significance of the blue banner as they shook hands with members of the adoring public, the message would have been clear to their Canadian escorts, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, his wife, Sophie Gr goire Trudeau, and Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson.

“That the royals are here is actually excellent, because Trudeau is showing them the Kitsilano Coast Guard Station he re-opened[3] after Harper closed it,” said banner carrier, Sarah Beuhler. “This coast is so beautiful, so him touring the coast [with the royals], remarking on its beauty, while simultaneously planning to put a pipeline and tanker project through that has a really good chance of just spoiling it, is something that should be highlighted.”

The royal couple spent roughly half an hour at the coast guard station in total, speaking with members of Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue, the Canadian Coast Guard, and B.C. Ambulance. At his opening address at the legislature in Victoria on Saturday, Prince William emphasized that environmental issues would be one of his primary areas of focus during their tour of western and northern Canada.

Locals Hope Royal Touch Will Help Protect B.C.'s Coast

Locals Hope Royal Touch Will Help Protect B.C.'s Coast

Opponents of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain expansion project wait for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge at the Kitsilano Coast Guard Station in Vancouver, B.C. on Sun. Sept. 25, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

An issue worth royal attention

Critics of Kinder Morgan’s controversial Trans Mountain expansion project believe it will endanger critical[4] marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and push Canada’s climate targets far beyond reach. Its supporters, however, argue that the pipeline would revitalize provincial economies[5] struggling from slumping oil prices, and provide much-needed jobs across the country. If approved, the expansion would add 987 kilometres of brand new pipeline to triple the capacity a system that already transports 300,000 barrels of oil per day from Alberta to Vancouver and Washington. According to the Texas-based Kinder Morgan, Trans Mountain is prepared to respond “quickly with detailed emergency procedures and trained professionals” should a spill occur on land or water, and the company’s emergency response plans are constantly being updated.

Mayor Gregor Robertson however, who has urged[6] the federal government to reject the project, said the threat to B.C.’s coast certainly merits royal attention. He spoke with National Observer after Prince William, Kate, Trudeau, and his wife had boarded a hovercraft bound for the Canadian Coast Guard Station Sea Island.

“I think anyone who comes to Vancouver from afar can appreciate how unique and incredible this place is and how much we rely upon our ocean for our success and well-being,” he explained. “It s been great that [the royals] have spent a lot of time on float planes and hovercrafts seeing our precious coast up close.

“I’m hopeful this exposure continues to cement the case that we’re going to stay as green as possible here.”

Locals Hope Royal Touch Will Help Protect B.C.'s Coast

Locals Hope Royal Touch Will Help Protect B.C.'s Coast

Prince William is welcomed onto Vancouver’s coastal Indigenous territory by Shamantsut, a cultural ambassador for the Squamish First Nation, on Sun. Sept. 25, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

First Nations welcome Will and Kate

The mayor’s sentiments were echoed by Squamish Chief Ian Campbell, who greeted the royal couple upon their arrival in Vancouver earlier that morning. His nation is one of more than 15 Indigenous communities and 21 municipalities that vehemently oppose the Kinder Morgan pipeline, and he welcomed the opportunity to tell Will and Kate about the need to protect his people’s cultural and economic resources.

“We welcomed the royal couple this morning and we talked about the beauty of this coast, the sacredness of these waters, and remembering that there’s a spiritual context that First Nations bring to our relationship to the waters we’ve used for thousands of years,” he said. “The relationship with the Crown in past has not been positive for us… we look to a brighter future that will involve First Nations and not just marginalize them.”

While the royal couple have officially concluded their visit to Vancouver, they will continue their environmental tour of B.C. in the Great Bear Rainforest on Monday, and in Haida Gwaii on Tuesday. Keep checking National Observer for coverage.

This report was made possible thanks to reader subscriptions. Please subscribe today.[7]

References

  1. ^ pipeline expansion proposal (www.transmountain.com)
  2. ^ increase tanker traffic (www.nationalobserver.com)
  3. ^ he re-opened (www.nationalobserver.com)
  4. ^ endanger critical (www.nationalobserver.com)
  5. ^ revitalize provincial economies (www.nationalobserver.com)
  6. ^ who has urged (www.nationalobserver.com)
  7. ^ subscribe today. (www.nationalobserver.com)