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Security guard throws shoes at homeless man

A Toronto security guard has been suspended following the release of a video that appears to show him throwing a pair of shoes at a homeless person lingering on Yonge Street this week. The quarrel between the pair began just after 8 a.m. Wednesday, during the morning rush to work. The video shows the man and a security guard weaving through an onslaught of pedestrians.

Caught on video

The video that captures the next moments is shaky at first, but the guard is standing in front of a building at 60 Yonge St. He takes off his jacket, walks toward the other man, and then appears to throw something at him. The argument continues until the guard picks up the homeless man’s shoes and throws them at him. One strikes the man in the ribs, the other in the back of his leg.

The person who recorded the video did not want to be identified. But the videographer wrote in an email to CBC News about seeing the security guard punch the homeless man before the filming began.

Security firm investigates

The security guard works for GardaWorld, which told CBC Toronto it is investigating the incident.

“GardaWorld was forwarded the video taken by the bystander. Upon receipt, it was immediately transferred to our corporate security team for investigation,” the firm said in a written statement. “The employee in question has been suspended pending further investigation.”

It’s unclear whether the incident could result in criminal charges.

Security Guard Throws Shoes At Homeless Man

This security guard is under investigation after being caught on video throwing shoes at a homeless man. (Submitted to CBC)

Const. Victor Kwong said that just by looking at the video, it’s hard to tell whether the security guard breached any laws.

“What we have to do is keep in mind of what this didn’t capture as well,” Kwong said. “We have to step back and take a look at the whole picture and see why it is the situation got to where it is.”

A spokesperson for the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty said regardless of what sparked the altercation, the security worker acted inappropriately.

“I’m sure that security guard has his own side, but I don’t think that there’s any good explanation for why someone could act that way,” A.J. Withers said.

‘Homeless people are invisible to most people.’ – A.J. Withers, Ontario Coalition Against Poverty

This happens far too often in Toronto, the poverty advocate said.

“Homeless people are dehumanized all the time and often victims of violence,” Withers said. “I’m sure it’s shocking to many people but, sadly, it’s something that we hear about or see all the time.”

The man in the video told CBC Toronto that he has been homeless for several years. Several people can be seen walking by him during the confrontation, but no one tried to stop it.

“It’s heartbreaking that no one intervenes, but it’s also not surprising,” Withers said. “That’s what you see on the street all the time, right? Homeless people are invisible to most people.”

Security guard suspended after he’s caught on video throwing shoes at a homeless man

A Toronto security guard has been suspended following the release of a video that appears to show him violently hurling a pair of shoes at a homeless person lingering on Yonge Street this week. The quarrel between the pair began just after 8 a.m. Wednesday, during the morning rush to work. A homeless man and a security guard can be seen on the video weaving through the onslaught of pedestrians, clearly in the middle of an altercation.

Caught on video

The video that captures the next moments is shaky at first, but you see the guard standing in front of a building at 60 Yonge St. He takes off his jacket, walks toward the other man, and then appears to throw something at him. The argument continues until the guard picks up the homeless man’s shoes and hurls them at him. One strikes the man in the ribs, the other in the back of his leg.

The person who recorded the video did not want to be identified, but in a email to CBC Toronto said they saw the security guard punch the homeless man before the filming began.

Security firm is investigating

The security guard works for GardaWorld security, which told CBC Toronto that they are investigating what happened.

“GardaWorld was forwarded the video taken by the bystander. Upon receipt, it was immediately transferred to our corporate security team for investigation,” the firm said in a written statement. “The employee in question has been suspended pending further investigation.”

It’s unclear, however, whether the incident could result in criminal charges.

Security Guard Suspended After He's Caught On Video Throwing Shoes At A Homeless Man

This security guard is under investigation after being caught on video throwing shoes at a homeless man. (Submitted to CBC)

Const. Victor Kwong said it’s hard to tell whether the security guard breached any laws just by looking at the video.

“What we have to do is keep in mind of what this didn’t capture as well,” Kwong said. “We have to step back and take a look at the whole picture and see why it is the situation got to where it is.”

But a spokesperson for the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty said that regardless of what sparked the altercation, the security acted inappropriately.

“I’m sure that security guard has his own side, but I don’t think that there’s any good explanation for why someone could act that way,” A.J. Withers said.

‘Homeless people are invisible to most people.’ – A.J. Withers, Ontario Coalition Against Poverty

Withers says the video is disappointing, but not surprising. This happens far too often in Toronto, the poverty advocate said.

“Homeless people are dehumanized all the time and often victims of violence,” Withers said. “I’m sure it’s shocking to many people but, sadly, it’s something that we hear about or see all the time.”

The man in the video told CBC Toronto that he has been homeless for several years. Several people can be seen walking by him during the confrontation, but none try to stop it.

“It’s heartbreaking that no one intervenes, but it’s also not surprising,” Withers said. “That’s what you see on the street all the time, right? Homeless people are invisible to most people.”

This year’s 4/20 event cost the City of Vancouver over $245000

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) This year s 4/20 marijuana day of protest in Vancouver cost the city more than $245,000. The city estimates 40,000 people were at Sunset Beach Park and the Vancouver Art Gallery during the April 20 protest. The city says in a news release that police costs came to over $170,000, while other costs such as sanitation, and fire and rescue pushed the costs even higher.

The Park Board refused to grant a permit to protest organizers, but the event went ahead without approval. The release says the bill doesn t include ambulance service or hospital costs. It says the damaged field next to Sunset Beach after the event cost about $10,000 to repair.

The city says it will bill the organizers of the Sunset Beach event to recover expenses, but it s still unclear whether they will pay.

We ve been trying to set up a lot of meetings months before, a month and a half before the event. I think we didn t give ourselves enough time to really push the conversation, but we ve met already, we ve handed over the invoice, says Michael Wiebe with the Vancouver Park Board. He adds organizers knew it was coming, and every cost was broken down. Wiebe claims organizers had an idea of the costs before the event, and staff will be sitting down with organizers again to justify costs.

The @ParkBoard[1] says 4/20 organizers knew the bill/costs were going to be high beforehand. Staff are going to have another meeting with them.

Sonia Aslam (@SoniaSAslam) May 26, 2017[2]

4/20 organizer Dana Larsen says they intend to fulfill their promise and pay back the park-board, but says some of the numbers invoiced need to be ironed out.

It s important to put these numbers in context. About a quarter of that total bill is actually for a different event that we re not affiliated with that took place at the Art Gallery. He adds the money is well-worth spent, considering the crowds generated by the annual event.

I mean we had a Trump Tower protest a few months ago. That cost $100,000 in policing and we only had a few hundred people there. This event is actually very reasonably priced for the number of people that participate, he says.

Organizer Jodie Emery from the Cannabis Cafe says paying the $245,000 is not feasible, or justified.

We re all taxpayers, we all pay for the cost of every event from music festivals to fireworks, to Vaisakhi and pride. So it would be unreasonable to demand that a bunch of volunteers who organized an event the city would have to organize themselves otherwise to pay for that. Emery says instead of asking organizers to pay the costs of things like policing and repairs to Sunset Beach, the park board and city should be thanking them for putting on the event. The activist wants to know why the annual smoke-up is being treated differently. Wiebe there is an incentive for organizers to pay sooner rather than later.

If they re working for the city s help in finding a location and working with them next year, they re probably going to want to do this quicker, because we need to find a location, settle it, put forward and emergency plan, have police, fire ready for next year s event.

References

  1. ^ @ParkBoard (twitter.com)
  2. ^ May 26, 2017 (twitter.com)