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Crocker to show Japanese American internment photographs

Following Japan s bombing of Pearl Harbor, the governments of the United States and Canada forcibly relocated citizens of Japanese ancestry. Two renowned photographers American Ansel Adams and Canadian Leonard Frank documented the relocation and internment of their fellow citizens. On Feb. 19 exactly 75 years to the day after Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the order authorizing the imprisonment of Japanese Americans, the Crocker Art Museum opened Two Views: Photographs by Ansel Adams and Leonard Frank. This compelling collection includes more than 60 images taken by Adams and Frank in the incarceration camps. To coincide with the exhibition opening the museum will also host a Day of Remembrance, to honor the resilience of Japanese Americans imprisoned in the camps.

While San Francisco-born photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984) was widely known for his landscape images, his documentation of the lives of Japanese Americans imprisoned in a California internment camp is itself a collection of high artistic as well as historical significance. On Feb. 19, 1942 President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 that authorized the designation of military zones along the West Coast and effectively led to the incarceration of some 120,000 Japanese Americans in camps scattered through the American West. Driven by anger and distress at the government s treatment of Japanese Americans, Adams made numerous trips at his own expense to photograph daily life inside one of the camps the Manzanar War Relocation Center in California s Owens Valley. Surrounded by barbed wire and armed guard towers, people at Manzanar lived in small barracks that provided minimal shelter against the extreme desert temperatures that could be scorching hot in the summer and bitterly cold in the winter.

Adams photographs emphasize the resourcefulness of the 10,000 prisoners who overcame defeat and despair and created a community with schools, farmland, a newspaper, a co-op store and several essential services. Adams exhibited the photographs at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and published them in his controversial 1945 book Born Free and Equal. He gave the complete collection to the Library of Congress in 1965.

This is a rare opportunity to see a different side of Ansel Adams, said Crocker Art Museum associate curator Kristina Gilmore. He s known for his majestic landscapes but these photographs are about humankind and America at its best and worst. The people pictured are suffering a terrible injustice but the photos show their courage and upbeat spirit in spite of it all. As a German-born Jew photographer Frank (1870-1944) moved to Alberni, British Columbia, Canada, in 1894. During World War I he had personally endured racism that forced his move to Vancouver in 1916.

Renowned for his commercial and industrial photography, the British Columbia Security Commission contracted him to record the removal of Japanese Canadians from the coast. Frank documented many who had been given 24 hours to pack one suitcase each before being separated from their families, their property sold without their consent. At Hastings Park, the internment camps in British Colombia and other incarceration sites, Frank s stark and disturbing photographs capture the institutional forces at work, with people living in makeshift bunk rooms crammed into agricultural buildings and horse stalls.

Leonard Frank s photographs reveal some of the grim environments of several holding areas and camps. It must have been especially disconcerting for him to see this happening in Canada because several of his own family members were being persecuted in Nazi Germany. His sister managed to escape Germany and survive the holocaust but other relatives were ultimately killed in the extermination camps, Gilmore said. Two Views: Photographs by Ansel Adams and Leonard Frank will be on view at the Crocker Art Museum from through May 14. The exhibition was organized by Nikkei National Museum and Cultural Centre. Crocker Art Museum registrar John Caswell will host a discussion about the Crocker Art Museum s connection.

Safe keeping

In 2013 Caswell discovered documents showing that the museum, which was known during World War II as the E.B Crocker Art Gallery, had held for safe-keeping some 400 artworks and prized possessions of at least 28 Japanese American artists and families who were forced out of Sacramento and other California cities. Approximately 250 of the stored objects were paintings by Henry Sugimoto, whose artwork was coincidentally exhibited at the Crocker in 2002, over a decade before the documents were discovered. Other objects held at the Crocker included kimonos, shrines, tea services, carvings and a stringed musical instrument called a koto. Most of the items were returned to their owners within a few years, though some remained at the Crocker for decades.

Additional tours, classes, performances and special events

Lunch and Learn, Tuesday, April 4, noon and 1 p.m. Join an in-depth examination of a single work of art from the Two Views exhibition, Relocation Center from Guard Tower, Manzanar Relocation Center by Ansel Adams. Before or after the 30-minute gallery conversation take time to enjoy lunch at the Crocker Caf by Supper Club. Free for members, free with general admission for nonmembers. Twisted Sacratomato Game Night: JapanAmerica edition, Thursday, March 30, 6-9 p.m. In celebration of Japanese culture, influence and history the Crocker s Twisted Sacratomato Game Night will have a Nipponese twist. Try your hand at go, the classic black-and-white tile board game or learn shogi, Japanese chess; cheer on or partake in a Sudoku battle; and enjoy Japanese-themed pub trivia, docent-led tours, board games and coloring books. A cash bar will be available all evening and everyone can enter to win Japanese swag raffles. Advance online registration is recommended at crockerartmusem.org. Free for members, $10 for nonmembers.

Faythe Vollrath, harpsichord, Sunday, April 9, prelude tour 1 and 2 p.m., concert at 3 p.m. In celebration of Japanese art and culture, harpsichordist Faythe Vollrath has created a program of contemporary compositions by Japanese and Japanese American composers. Advance online registration is recommended at crockerartmusem.org.

$6 for members, $10 for students, youth, Capital Public Radio members and $12 for nonmembers. ArtMix: Sakuramento, Thursday, April 13, 5 to 9 p.m. Karaoke, anime, manga and maybe a Bonsai or two things pop off Japanese-style at this adults-only party with live music, drinks, dancing, art and surprises. Dance to global beats with DJ Sam I Jam, get a taste of Japanese artisanal beers and be among the first of your friends to witness the rare Kagamiwari (sake barrel top-breaking) ritual. Advance online registration is recommended at crockerartmusem.org.
Age 21+, $5 drink specials all night, free for members, $10 for nonmembers. Art Class for Adults: Picturing Injustice Photography and Social Documentary, two Thursdays, April 20 and 27, 6 to 8 p.m. Art historian Naomi Rosenblum says social documentary photography combines lucid pictorial organization with an often-passionate commitment to humanistic values to ideals of dignity, the right to decent conditions of living and work and to truthfulness. This two-session class will highlight the social documentary work of photographers who enlighten, provoke and inform.
Session 1 Two Views: Ansel Adams and Leonard Frank
Session 2 Illuminating the 1960s: Danny Lyon and Social Documentary. $50 for members, $70 for nonmembers.

Art Class for Adults: The Art of Ikebana, Saturday, April 29, 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Discover Japanese flower arranging in this class that offers participants an understanding of the recorded history and the meaning behind certain rules of construction. Students will be individually assisted by a certified instructor and a team of experienced Ikebana arrangers. Select from a variety of living materials provided and create two flower arrangements. Instructor is Ikebana International Sacramento Chapter 26. $75 for members, $90 for nonmembers. The Crocker Art Museum was the first public art museum in the Western U.S. and is one of the leading art museums in California today. Established in 1885, the museum features one of the country s finest collections of Californian art, exceptional holdings of master drawings, a comprehensive collection of international ceramics, as well as European, Asian, African and Oceanic art. The Crocker is located at 216 O St. in downtown Sacramento. Museum hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday through Sunday and 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursdays. Every third Sunday of the month is Pay What You Wish Sunday sponsored by Western Health Advantage.

For more information call (916) 808-7000 or visit crockerartmuseum.org.

Payroll glitch: Months later, Kent prison guard still getting stiffed …

A guard at B.C. s Kent Institution is among thousands of federal government employees still plagued by payroll shortfalls and inconsistencies a year after the government rolled out its computerized Phoenix payroll system. Kent guard Doug Holloway s problems started in July when he relocated from an Alberta facility to B.C. s Kent, and the system had trouble registering the change. Since then, he has had missed paycheques and paycheques that fell short, culminating last month when his wife and family back in Alberta had to get groceries from their local food bank. This past weekend he got an email from Phoenix headquarters in New Brunswick telling him that his regular paycheque wouldn t be coming this Wednesday, leaving him scrambling to get an emergency pay advance from local corrections authorities.

I ve been cordial, I ve been really patient, and it s just getting to the point now I m like are you guys even trained to do this, what is going on here, Holloway said from his home in Chilliwack.

Holloway is an armed guard at Kent, a maximum-security prison housing some of Canada s most hardened criminals. He is among several of Kent s 300 guards facing similar problems. I work, I do my job, I ve never had anything on my record in four years. Just pay me and I m happy. Holloway is still paying rent and expenses in Grande Cache, Alta., for his wife Sherry and their teenage children, while they make plans to move the family to Chilliwack. Sherry Holloway said she went to the food bank a week and half ago after similar paycheque problems.

I ve always been one to give to the food bank, she said. It definitely humbled me.

Payroll Glitch: Months Later, Kent Prison Guard Still Getting Stiffed ...

Kent institution guard Doug Holloway is pictured with his wife Sherry (back row) and children (from left) Liam, Shamus, Scarlette and Mackenzie. [PNG Merlin Archive] PNG

The couple have a 17-year-old daughter, twin 14-year-old sons, and a 19-year-old son who is paying them a small amount of rent while he looks for a job.

The glitch-prone computerized system was initiated by the previous Conservative government, and then launched last February by the incoming Liberals. It involved replacing 2,700 payroll specialists across Canada, with 500 people to run the system in Miramichi, New Brunswick. At mid-2016, some 80,000 federal employees were experiencing payroll problems. By last month, that number was down to about 8,000, according to the government.

Some of the estimated processing timelines will frustrate employees, especially those who have already waited many months for their pay, said Marie Lemay, deputy minister for Public Services and Procurements Canada, the federal agency that oversees payroll, in an online message to federal workers this month.

It s brutal, I ve never seen anything like it before in my life, said Jason Godin, the national president of the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers. We repeatedly called on the government to put an end to Phoenix. He said his 7,400 members nationwide are a unique case because their jobs frequently involve injuries and stress leaves that affect their pay schedules.

Godin was able to point to one bit of good news after union lobbying the government has agreed to set up a satellite payroll office sometime this year in Kingston, Ont., specifically to handle Corrections Canada payroll issues. But another stress factor looms federal workers could face further complications when they fill out their 2016 tax returns. Lemay advised those workers to file their taxes normally, and if their earning information is later adjusted, the payroll agency will advise the Canada Revenue Agency, and tax returns will be adjusted without individuals having to refile.

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Payroll glitch: Months later, Kent prison guard still getting stiffed on pay

A guard at B.C. s Kent Institution is among thousands of federal government employees still plagued by payroll shortfalls and inconsistencies a year after the government rolled out its computerized Phoenix payroll system. Kent guard Doug Holloway s problems started in July when he relocated from an Alberta facility to B.C. s Kent, and the system had trouble registering the change. Since then, he has had missed paycheques and paycheques that fell short, culminating last month when his wife and family back in Alberta had to get groceries from their local food bank. This past weekend he got an email from Phoenix headquarters in New Brunswick telling him that his regular paycheque wouldn t be coming this Wednesday, leaving him scrambling to get an emergency pay advance from local corrections authorities.

I ve been cordial, I ve been really patient, and it s just getting to the point now I m like are you guys even trained to do this, what is going on here, Holloway said from his home in Chilliwack.

Holloway is an armed guard at Kent, a maximum-security prison housing some of Canada s most hardened criminals. He is among several of Kent s 300 guards facing similar problems. I work, I do my job, I ve never had anything on my record in four years. Just pay me and I m happy. Holloway is still paying rent and expenses in Grande Cache, Alta., for his wife Sherry and their teenage children, while they make plans to move the family to Chilliwack. Sherry Holloway said she went to the food bank a week and half ago after similar paycheque problems.

I ve always been one to give to the food bank, she said. It definitely humbled me.

Payroll Glitch: Months Later, Kent Prison Guard Still Getting Stiffed On Pay

Kent institution guard Doug Holloway is pictured with his wife Sherry (back row) and children (from left) Liam, Shamus, Scarlette and Mackenzie. [PNG Merlin Archive] PNG

The couple have a 17-year-old daughter, twin 14-year-old sons, and a 19-year-old son who is paying them a small amount of rent while he looks for a job.

The glitch-prone computerized system was initiated by the previous Conservative government, and then launched last February by the incoming Liberals. It involved replacing 2,700 payroll specialists across Canada, with 500 people to run the system in Miramichi, New Brunswick. At mid-2016, some 80,000 federal employees were experiencing payroll problems. By last month, that number was down to about 8,000, according to the government.

Some of the estimated processing timelines will frustrate employees, especially those who have already waited many months for their pay, said Marie Lemay, deputy minister for Public Services and Procurements Canada, the federal agency that oversees payroll, in an online message to federal workers this month.

It s brutal, I ve never seen anything like it before in my life, said Jason Godin, the national president of the Union of Canadian Correctional Officers. We repeatedly called on the government to put an end to Phoenix. He said his 7,400 members nationwide are a unique case because their jobs frequently involve injuries and stress leaves that affect their pay schedules.

Godin was able to point to one bit of good news after union lobbying the government has agreed to set up a satellite payroll office sometime this year in Kingston, Ont., specifically to handle Corrections Canada payroll issues. But another stress factor looms federal workers could face further complications when they fill out their 2016 tax returns. Lemay advised those workers to file their taxes normally, and if their earning information is later adjusted, the payroll agency will advise the Canada Revenue Agency, and tax returns will be adjusted without individuals having to refile.

twitter.com/glenschaefer[2]

Related

Is there more to this story? We d like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Email

References

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