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Apax to exit security services company GardaWorld

Apax Partners has agreed to sell its remaining stake in Montreal-based GardaWorld, a security and cash services provider, to Rh ne Capital and Stephan Cr tier, founder, chairman and CEO of GardaWorld. No financial terms were disclosed. The deal is expected to close, providing all conditions are met, during the quarter ending July 31, 2017.

PRESS RELEASE

MONTREAL, QUEBEC (Marketwired March 24, 2017) Garda World Security Corporation ( GardaWorld ), one of the world s largest privately owned security and cash services providers, announced today that Stephan Cr tier, along with certain members of management and an entity held by investment funds affiliated with Rh ne Capital ( Rh ne ), a global alternative investment management firm, have entered into a conditional purchase agreement with a subsidiary of funds advised by Apax Partners ( Apax ) to acquire all of Apax s remaining shares of the parent company of GardaWorld. Closing of the transaction, if all conditions are satisfied or waived, is expected to occur during the quarter ending July 31, 2017.

Apax has leveraged its financial expertise to support management in the growth of the company highlighted Stephan Cr tier. The Board of Directors wishes to thank the Apax team for its contribution. Since November 2012, the company underwent exceptional growth, almost doubling in size in terms of its revenues and its employees. GardaWorld now operates in 29 countries in Africa, Middle East and Europe. The Management Team and myself are excited to continue our partnership with Rh ne to build a true global Canadian Champion. Upon closing of the transaction, Apax will no longer own shares in GardaWorld s parent company, while Stephan Cr tier, Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of GardaWorld, will hold, along with certain management stockholders, approximately 39% (fully diluted) of the shares in GardaWorld s parent company and Rh ne will increase its holding to 61% (fully diluted). Each party will be subject to customary shareholder provisions for an investment of this type. About GardaWorld
GardaWorld is one of the world s largest privately owned security services providers, offering a range of highly focused business solutions including cash services, protective services and aviation services. GardaWorld s more than 62,000 highly trained, dedicated professionals serve clients throughout North America, the Middle East, Africa and Europe. GardaWorld works across a broad range of sectors, including financial services, infrastructure, natural resources and retail, and services Fortune 500 companies, governments and humanitarian relief organizations. For more information, visit www.garda.com

About Rh ne Capital
With over 20 years of investing experience, Rh ne is a global alternative investment management firm with a focus on investments in market leading businesses with a pan-European or transatlantic presence and prospects for global expansion. Rh ne, which is currently investing capital from its fifth private equity fund, has prior experience with service companies, as well as in the chemical, consumer product, food, packaging, specialty material and transportation sectors.

About Apax Partners
Apax Partners is one of the world s leading private equity investment groups. It operates globally and has more than 30 years of investing experience. Apax Partners has advised funds that total over $40 billion around the world in aggregate. Funds advised by Apax invest in companies across four global sectors of Tech & Telco, Services, Healthcare and Consumer. These funds provide long-term equity financing to build and strengthen world-class companies. For further information about Apax, please visit www.apax.com.

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References

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London attack all too familiar to attack here

As the frightening footage unfolds from London, how it brings back grim memories of the terror attack on our own Parliament Hill almost three years ago. A man in uniform attacked and killed by a terrorist determined to breach the heart of our government, to defile the centre of our democracy. A lone wolf bent on destruction. So it was with Ottawa s assailant, Michael Zehaf-Bibeau. And now apparently, an eerily similar attack by a killer in London.

How simple, and deadly, are their methods. There s no need for sophisticated suitcase bombs or complex chemical warfare. Instead, the weapons of choice these days are a simple vehicle and perhaps a knife or gun. The London assailant drove a Hyundai into pedestrians walking along Westminster Bridge, mowing down dozens of people, including three French teens on a field trip in the British capital. As bodies lay broken and bleeding in his wake, he smashed his vehicle into the iron railings surrounding Parliament and then lunged at an unarmed police officer with his knife, plunging it over and over again until he was finally shot dead. His rampage claimed five lives and left at least 40 injured.

In the Ottawa attack, Zehaf-Bibeau didn t use his car as a weapon, though two days earlier in Quebec, jihadist Martin Rouleau would use his to kill Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent. Vehicle-ramming on a large scale is a more recent terrorist strategy thanks to Nice and Berlin, where it provided so much carnage with so little effort. Last summer, it was a tractor trailer driven into a seaside crowd watching fireworks on Bastille Day, slaughtering 84. Months later, a truck driven into a Christmas market killed 12. In other ways, though, the echoes of our own terror attack reverberate from across the pond.

Corp. Nathan Cirillo was gunned down Oct. 22 2014 as he stood guard at the National War Memorial, shot three times while guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. His killer then turned his sights on Parliament, storming through the doors of the Centre Block where Conservatives and the NDP had just begun their respective caucus meetings. Frightened MPs barricaded themselves behind doors reinforced with furniture as a wild gunfight in the hall ended with the death of Zehaf-Bibeau. The symbolism of attacking our seat of government was no accident, not in Ottawa and not in London. The values … our Parliament represents – democracy, freedom, human rights, the rule of law – command the admiration and respect of free people everywhere, said British Prime Minister Theresa May.

That is why it is a target for those who reject those values. In the initial hours of chaos and fear, we anxiously search for heroes as a counterpoint to the nihilistic ugliness of terror. In Ottawa, we latched onto the six bystanders who tried to keep Cirillo alive, telling the young father he was brave and he was loved. And of course, there were the men who finally brought the assault to an end: then-sergeant-at-arms Kevin Vickers, now Canada s ambassador to Ireland, and RCMP Const. Curtis Barrett.

In London, it was the first responders who had long trained for this inevitable day: those who quickly killed the assailant before he could make his way into Parliament itself and those who tended the many who lay wounded along the road. Most striking, though, was the photo of Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood, blood still on his brow, who was rightly heralded as a hero for his desperate attempt to perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on the dying Parliamentary police officer. There are other parallels as well. As in Ottawa, there is initial reticence to state what so many naturally assume: that the motive here was radical Islamic terror. It finally took the release of his cellphone video manifesto before many would finally accept that the Canadian-born Zehaf-Bibeau stormed Parliament Hill as a jihadist determined to kill the infidels. Hours after Wednesday s violence, UK police confirmed they e working on the assumption that it was inspired by Islamist-related terrorism. They have yet to release the name of the culprit.

But here, too, the similarities are striking. It appears this terrorist is yet another homegrown radical bent on destroying the way of life he s long enjoyed.

References

  1. ^

London attack all too familiar to attack on Parliament Hill

As the frightening footage unfolds from London, how it brings back grim memories of the terror attack on our own Parliament Hill almost three years ago. A man in uniform attacked and killed by a terrorist determined to breach the heart of our government, to defile the centre of our democracy. A lone wolf bent on destruction. So it was with Ottawa s assailant, Michael Zehaf-Bibeau. And now apparently, an eerily similar attack by a killer in London.

How simple, and deadly, are their methods. There s no need for sophisticated suitcase bombs or complex chemical warfare. Instead, the weapons of choice these days are a simple vehicle and perhaps a knife or gun. The London assailant drove a Hyundai into pedestrians walking along Westminster Bridge, mowing down dozens of people, including three French teens on a field trip in the British capital. As bodies lay broken and bleeding in his wake, he smashed his vehicle into the iron railings surrounding Parliament and then lunged at an unarmed police officer with his knife, plunging it over and over again until he was finally shot dead. His rampage claimed five lives and left at least 40 injured.

In the Ottawa attack, Zehaf-Bibeau didn t use his car as a weapon, though two days earlier in Quebec, jihadist Martin Rouleau would use his to kill Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent. Vehicle-ramming on a large scale is a more recent terrorist strategy thanks to Nice and Berlin, where it provided so much carnage with so little effort. Last summer, it was a tractor trailer driven into a seaside crowd watching fireworks on Bastille Day, slaughtering 84. Months later, a truck driven into a Christmas market killed 12. In other ways, though, the echoes of our own terror attack reverberate from across the pond.

Corp. Nathan Cirillo was gunned down Oct. 22 2014 as he stood guard at the National War Memorial, shot three times while guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. His killer then turned his sights on Parliament, storming through the doors of the Centre Block where Conservatives and the NDP had just begun their respective caucus meetings. Frightened MPs barricaded themselves behind doors reinforced with furniture as a wild gunfight in the hall ended with the death of Zehaf-Bibeau. The symbolism of attacking our seat of government was no accident, not in Ottawa and not in London. The values … our Parliament represents – democracy, freedom, human rights, the rule of law – command the admiration and respect of free people everywhere, said British Prime Minister Theresa May.

That is why it is a target for those who reject those values. In the initial hours of chaos and fear, we anxiously search for heroes as a counterpoint to the nihilistic ugliness of terror. In Ottawa, we latched onto the six bystanders who tried to keep Cirillo alive, telling the young father he was brave and he was loved. And of course, there were the men who finally brought the assault to an end: then-sergeant-at-arms Kevin Vickers, now Canada s ambassador to Ireland, and RCMP Const. Curtis Barrett.

In London, it was the first responders who had long trained for this inevitable day: those who quickly killed the assailant before he could make his way into Parliament itself and those who tended the many who lay wounded along the road. Most striking, though, was the photo of Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood, blood still on his brow, who was rightly heralded as a hero for his desperate attempt to perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on the dying Parliamentary police officer. There are other parallels as well. As in Ottawa, there is initial reticence to state what so many naturally assume: that the motive here was radical Islamic terror. It finally took the release of his cellphone video manifesto before many would finally accept that the Canadian-born Zehaf-Bibeau stormed Parliament Hill as a jihadist determined to kill the infidels. Hours after Wednesday s violence, UK police confirmed they e working on the assumption that it was inspired by Islamist-related terrorism. They have yet to release the name of the culprit.

But here, too, the similarities are striking. It appears this terrorist is yet another homegrown radical bent on destroying the way of life he s long enjoyed.

References

  1. ^

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