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‘Shaunak’ inducted into Coast Guard giving fillip to maritime security …

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Vasco: The maritime security of India has got another significant fillip with the induction of the fourth in the series of the new 105M Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) ICGS SHAUNAK in the Indian Coast Guard, built by Goa Shipyard Ltd (GSL) using its in-house design.Union Railway Minister Suresh Prabhu commissioned the ship in presence of senior Indian Coast guard officials including Director General Rajendra Singh. The ship on joining coast guard fleet will be based at Visakhapatnam and be deployed extensively for Exclusive Economic Zone surveillance and other duties as enshrined in Coast Guard charter to safeguard the maritime interests of India.
The induction of ICGS Shaunak will help meet the increasing requirement of the Indian Coast Guard for policing and patrolling of the vast Indian Exclusive Economic Zone. The ship has state of the art propulsion/ machinery controls for ease of operation, advanced EW and electronic systems and guns.
Prabhu said that the induction of the ship would boost the maritime security of the country, which is becoming more important day by day with the growth of Indian economy. The Coast Guard with its various activities has won the trust of not only of the coastal people but also the whole nation, which will help strengthening nation s overall security. Induction of such vessels will also help conserve the biodiversity of our seas, he said.Significantly, this Vessel has registered excellent performance at sea during trials, clearing all trial parameters comfortably and achieving over 26 Knot speed, as against contractual speed of 23 knots. Despite 5.35% higher displacement as compared to previous ships, fuel efficiency is improved by 16.36%, endurance is increased by 14% besides much improved crew-comfort, ergonomics and head space etc. It has 18% smaller turning circle diameter, thereby providing improved maneuverability for the vessel and capability to get into combat position expeditiously.
GSL CMD RAdm Shekhar Mital, who is credited with the remarkable turnaround of the shipyard in last three years, said, GSL has delivered four OPVs to Coast Guard in the last 16 months, all ahead of schedule. This ship has been delivered 62 days ahead of schedule and has taken three years to build. There are very few parallels of this kind of delivery and execution performance that exist, in Indian ship building industry and compares favorably with International Shipbuilding standards. Director General Coast Guard Rajendra Singh highlighted the strong symbiotic relationship of mutual cooperation between Goa Shipyard and Coast Guard and saying that the excellent quality of the OPVs delivered by GSL is testimony to its innate capability and strong commitment to customers, which has gone a long way in assisting Coast Guard achieve its capital expansion plan. [H]

Herald: ‘Shaunak’ inducted into Coast Guard giving fillip to maritime …

VASCO: The maritime security of India has got another significant fillip with the induction of the fourth in the series of the new 105M Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) ICGS SHAUNAK in the Indian Coast Guard, built by Goa Shipyard Ltd (GSL) using its in-house design.

23 Feb, 2017, 01:49AM IST

Team Herald

VASCO: The maritime security of India has got another significant fillip with the induction of the fourth in the series of the new 105M Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) ICGS SHAUNAK in the Indian Coast Guard, built by Goa Shipyard Ltd (GSL) using its in-house design.

Union Railway Minister Suresh Prabhu commissioned the ship in presence of senior Indian Coast guard officials including Director General Rajendra Singh. The ship on joining coast guard fleet will be based at Visakhapatnam and be deployed extensively for Exclusive Economic Zone surveillance and other duties as enshrined in Coast Guard charter to safeguard the maritime interests of India.

The induction of ICGS Shaunak will help meet the increasing requirement of the Indian Coast Guard for policing and patrolling of the vast Indian Exclusive Economic Zone. The ship has state of the art propulsion/ machinery controls for ease of operation, advanced EW and electronic systems and guns.

Prabhu said that the induction of the ship would boost the maritime security of the country, which is becoming more important day by day with the growth of Indian economy. The Coast Guard with its various activities has won the trust of not only of the coastal people but also the whole nation, which will help strengthening nation s overall security. Induction of such vessels will also help conserve the biodiversity of our seas, he said.

Significantly, this Vessel has registered excellent performance at sea during trials, clearing all trial parameters comfortably and achieving over 26 Knot speed, as against contractual speed of 23 knots. Despite 5.35% higher displacement as compared to previous ships, fuel efficiency is improved by 16.36%, endurance is increased by 14% besides much improved crew-comfort, ergonomics and head space etc. It has 18% smaller turning circle diameter, thereby providing improved maneuverability for the vessel and capability to get into combat position expeditiously.

GSL CMD RAdm Shekhar Mital, who is credited with the remarkable turnaround of the shipyard in last three years, said, GSL has delivered four OPVs to Coast Guard in the last 16 months, all ahead of schedule. This ship has been delivered 62 days ahead of schedule and has taken three years to build. There are very few parallels of this kind of delivery and execution performance that exist, in Indian ship building industry and compares favorably with International Shipbuilding standards.

Director General Coast Guard Rajendra Singh highlighted the strong symbiotic relationship of mutual cooperation between Goa Shipyard and Coast Guard and saying that the excellent quality of the OPVs delivered by GSL is testimony to its innate capability and strong commitment to customers, which has gone a long way in assisting Coast Guard achieve its capital expansion plan.

Apex maritime security body still missing, nine years after 26/11 terror strikes

NEW DELHI: The government is yet to get cracking on a national maritime authority (NMA), which was strongly recommended after the 26/11 terror strikes in 2008 and promised by the NDA government soon after it came to power in 2014, even as Phase-II of the coastal surveillance network (CSN) was finally approved on Tuesday.

The defence acquisitions council, chaired by defence minister Manohar Parrikar, accorded the initial nod or “acceptance of necessity” to the Rs 803 crore project for Phase-II of the CSN. This will involve setting up 38 more radar stations with static radars and electro-optic sensors, four mobile surveillance stations and integration of VTMS (vessel traffic management systems) sites in the Gulfs of Kutch and Khambat. This follows Phase-I at a cost of Rs 600 crore, under which 36 radar stations on the mainland, six in Lakshadweep and Minicoy and four in Andaman and Nicobar are now operational after several delays, say officials. The CSN, incidentally, was first mooted almost two decades ago but gained momentum only after the 26/11 terror strikes in Mumbai rocked India like never before. Similarly, while several measures ranging from setting up of state marine police stations and the Sagar Prahari Bal to the naval NC3I (national command, control, communication and intelligence) network have been implemented, the overall progress on revamping the country’s entire coastal security[4] architecture has been excruciatingly slow.

A glaring example is the NDA government’s failure to act on its own promise, made during the President’s address to Parliament in June 2014, of setting up the NMA to ensure effective coordination among the multiple authorities dealing with maritime and coastal security issues in the country.

The urgent need for an apex federal body to coordinate and bring synergy among the different stakeholders, ranging from central ministries and state governments to the Navy, Coast Guard, customs, intelligence agencies and port authorities, was even stressed way back in 2001 by the high-powered Group of Ministers on “reforming the national security system” after the 1999 Kargil conflict.

But much like the chief of defence staff (CDS) post in the armed forces, the proposed NMA or the maritime security advisory board (with a maritime security advisor as its chief) has also proved elusive.

Instead, the National Committee on Strengthening Maritime and Coastal Security (NCSMCS), under the cabinet secretary, meets just two to three times a year to decide on measures to plug gaps. “The NCSMCS does not fit the bill for cohesive planning and implementation of coastal and maritime security measures. A NMA is desperately required,” admitted an official.
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References

  1. ^ national maritime authority (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  2. ^ 26/11 (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  3. ^ coastal surveillance network (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  4. ^ coastal security (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  5. ^ maritime security (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  6. ^ News (play.google.com)
  7. ^ here (get.timesofindia.com)
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