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What’s on TV Wednesday: A ‘Dirty Dancing’ Remake and ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

PhotoWhat's On TV Wednesday: A 'Dirty Dancing' Remake And 'The Handmaid's Tale' Colt Prattes and Abigail Breslin in Dirty Dancing. Credit Guy D’Alema/ABC

Frances Houseman and Johnny Castle have the time of their lives again in a remake of Dirty Dancing. And Luke resurfaces in The Handmaid s Tale.

What s on TV

DIRTY DANCING (2017) 8 p.m. on ABC. Abigail Breslin and Colt Prattes take on the roles made famous by Jennifer Grey and Patrick Swayze in this remake of the 1987 blockbuster about Frances Houseman (but everyone calls her Baby), an untraditional beauty who falls for the bad boy Johnny Castle during her family s Catskills vacation in the summer of 1963. The story is essentially the same the unwanted pregnancy and illegal abortion remain in this three-hour production, which adds singing to the mix. But it also aims for a more modern relevancy with a sexless marriage and looming empty nest for Baby s parents (Debra Messing and Bruce Greenwood) and an attempted date rape for her older sister (Sarah Hyland), followed by an interracial flirtation.

LAW & ORDER: SPECIAL VICTIMS UNIT 9 p.m. on NBC. A hate crime is committed against a Muslim family and a daughter is killed. But when a witness is deported, Barba is forced to drop the charges against a suspect and protests turn violent, leading a desperate Benson to make an arrest.

EMPIRE 9 p.m. on Fox. The season wraps with an appearance by Demi Moore, and the promise of more of her to come.

Continue reading the main story[1]

What s Streaming

Photo What's On TV Wednesday: A 'Dirty Dancing' Remake And 'The Handmaid's Tale' Juliette Binoche Credit Laurent Thurin Nal/Sundance Selects

CERTIFIED COPY (2011) on Sundance Now[2]. Juliette Binoche won best actress at Cannes for Elle, a gallery owner and single mother in a Tuscan village who attends a lecture by a highhanded British author (William Shimell) on authenticity in art. Then she invites him on a tour of the countryside, during which he is mistaken for her husband and they keep up the pretense. The Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami s delicious brain tickler, Stephen Holden wrote in The New York Times[3], is an endless hall of mirrors whose reflections multiply as its story of a middle-aged couple driving through Tuscany carries them into a metaphysical labyrinth. Ms. Binoche s Elle, he added, brings it to intense, pulsing life.

Pair it with MUSEUM HOURS (2013), also on Sundance Now[4], in which Johann (Bobby Sommer), a security guard at the Kunsthistorisches Museum[5] in Vienna, and Anne (Mary Margaret O Hara), a Canadian who has come to Austria to sit at the bedside of a cousin in a coma, find refuge among Dutch and Flemish works. Though their relationship is seemingly not sexual Johann is gay it is deeply romantic. Jem Cohen s quietly amazing, sneakily sublime tale of cross-cultural friendship, A. O. Scott wrote in The Times[6], is rigorously and intensely lifelike, which is to say that it s also a strange and moving work of art.

Photo What's On TV Wednesday: A 'Dirty Dancing' Remake And 'The Handmaid's Tale' O-T Fagbenle, center, in The Handmaid s Tale. Credit George Kraychyk/Hulu

THE HANDMAID S TALE on Hulu. Offred (Elisabeth Moss) remembers life before Gilead and her family s daring attempt to escape as she and her husband, Luke (O-T Fagbenle), each learn that the other is alive.

Continue reading the main story[7]

References

  1. ^ Continue reading the main story (www.nytimes.com)
  2. ^ Sundance Now (www.sundancenow.com)
  3. ^ wrote in The New York Times (www.nytimes.com)
  4. ^ Sundance Now (www.sundancenow.com)
  5. ^ Kunsthistorisches Museum (www.khm.at)
  6. ^ wrote in The Times (www.nytimes.com)
  7. ^ Continue reading the main story (www.nytimes.com)

The Case of Ebby Steppach: Were Crucial Investigation Mistakes Made?

The Case Of Ebby Steppach: Were Crucial Investigation Mistakes Made?

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Missing but not forgotten… One Little Rock family is holding on to hope that their daughter will come home alive. They’re discouraged, though, after some say mistakes were made during the most crucial hours after the now 20-year-old Ebby Steppach disappeared.

“There are only so many hours in the day,” Tommy Hudson, retired Little Rock detective, said. As each minute goes by–

“Time went on and on and on and on,” Laurie Jernigan, Ebby Steppach’s mother, said.

20-year-old Ebby Steppach is missing — and has been for nearly two years.

“Those early hours, early days, early weeks are critical,” Michael Jernigan, Ebby’s stepfather, said.

“For the first part of the investigation, no one looked for her,” Laurie said. Ebby’s mom, Laurie, and Ebby’s step-father, Michael, know all too well about time, and they say Little Rock Police know it even better.

“The whole first 30 days was just counting on Ebby showing back up,” Michael said.

Ebby fell off the grid in October 2015. Her family reported the then 18-year-old missing. Little Rock’s Violent Crime Squad picked up the case.

“The detective that was assigned to it at that time was one of our newer detectives,” Hudson said. Laurie says it didn’t take long–

“I would back track.”

–for her to lose trust in law enforcement.

“Part of the investigation that was going on didn’t match up with what they were telling me,” Laurie said.

About a week after Ebby vanished, her 2003 Volkswagen was found abandoned in Chalamount Park in West Little Rock. Ebby’s mother and step-father say a security guard reported the car, but the LRPD didn’t check on the tip for several days.

“The department itself, when the call came in on three different occasions that week, did not recognize and connect that this car belonged to a missing person,” Michael said.

“Didn’t put it together that this was a crime scene,” Laurie said. Ebby’s parents say the car had a dead battery and was out of gas, making Laurie think the worst.

“Her car was running and someone took her from it,” Laurie said.

The Central High School student’s cell phone, makeup, keys and eye contacts were left behind. Laurie says she encouraged the detective on the case to get surveillance footage from the Walmart across the street from the park.

“He said, ‘Do you know how much tape that is to look through?’ and I said ‘Yes I’ll look through it. I mean, I don’t care, I’ll look through it.’ And he said, ‘No, no, I’ll look into it.’ He never looked into it,” Laurie said.

“I think something has happened to her,” Hudson said. Ebby’s case would eventually be moved to Little Rock’s Homicide Squad — a group of the city’s most experienced detectives.

“When I got the case, there were things that weren’t done that should’ve been done on the front end,” Hudson said.

— Which included asking for the surveillance footage from Walmart. By then, the tapes had already been erased.

The retired detective says the case — which currently has the potential of being a homicide — needed to be “cleaned up.”

Hudson says some key people were never interviewed.

“I believe there’s somebody out there that’s in her circle, in her social media circle, that may know what happened to her and hasn’t come forward for whatever reason,” Hudson said. Hudson says the original detective skipped parts of the social media search.

“We always look at that. Why it wasn’t done at the time, I can’t answer that. I can tell you it’s been done now,” Hudson said.

“I don’t know if I can explain the level of powerlessness I felt,” Laurie said. From the balloons at Chalamount Park, to the interstate that connects city to city and state to state —

“The biggest fear is that we will never know,” Michael said.

–The clock will keep ticking, and Ebby’s family will keep praying for an end.

“I just want closure,” Laurie said.

–No matter the road it takes.

Ebby’s parents have both taken polygraphs. Sources say both parents passed. Hudson says the parents are not suspects.

Little Rock Police are still asking for tips regarding the case. If you know anything about what happened to Ebby Steppach, you’re asked to give them a call.

The Case of Ebby Steppach: Were Crucial Investigation Mistakes

The Case Of Ebby Steppach: Were Crucial Investigation Mistakes

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Missing but not forgotten… One Little Rock family is holding on to hope that their daughter will come home alive. They’re discouraged, though, after some say mistakes were made during the most crucial hours after the now 20-year-old Ebby Steppach disappeared.

“There are only so many hours in the day,” Tommy Hudson, retired Little Rock detective, said. As each minute goes by–

“Time went on and on and on and on,” Laurie Jernigan, Ebby Steppach’s mother, said.

20-year-old Ebby Steppach is missing — and has been for nearly two years.

“Those early hours, early days, early weeks are critical,” Michael Jernigan, Ebby’s stepfather, said.

“For the first part of the investigation, no one looked for her,” Laurie said. Ebby’s mom, Laurie, and Ebby’s step-father, Michael, know all too well about time, and they say Little Rock Police know it even better.

“The whole first 30 days was just counting on Ebby showing back up,” Michael said.

Ebby fell off the grid in October 2015. Her family reported the then 18-year-old missing. Little Rock’s Violent Crime Squad picked up the case.

“The detective that was assigned to it at that time was one of our newer detectives,” Hudson said. Laurie says it didn’t take long–

“I would back track.”

–for her to lose trust in law enforcement.

“Part of the investigation that was going on didn’t match up with what they were telling me,” Laurie said.

About a week after Ebby vanished, her 2003 Volkswagen was found abandoned in Chalamount Park in West Little Rock. Ebby’s mother and step-father say a security guard reported the car, but the LRPD didn’t check on the tip for several days.

“The department itself, when the call came in on three different occasions that week, did not recognize and connect that this car belonged to a missing person,” Michael said.

“Didn’t put it together that this was a crime scene,” Laurie said. Ebby’s parents say the car had a dead battery and was out of gas, making Laurie think the worst.

“Her car was running and someone took her from it,” Laurie said.

The Central High School student’s cell phone, makeup, keys and eye contacts were left behind. Laurie says she encouraged the detective on the case to get surveillance footage from the Walmart across the street from the park.

“He said, ‘Do you know how much tape that is to look through?’ and I said ‘Yes I’ll look through it. I mean, I don’t care, I’ll look through it.’ And he said, ‘No, no, I’ll look into it.’ He never looked into it,” Laurie said.

“I think something has happened to her,” Hudson said. Ebby’s case would eventually be moved to Little Rock’s Homicide Squad — a group of the city’s most experienced detectives.

“When I got the case, there were things that weren’t done that should’ve been done on the front end,” Hudson said.

— Which included asking for the surveillance footage from Walmart. By then, the tapes had already been erased.

The retired detective says the case — which currently has the potential of being a homicide — needed to be “cleaned up.”

Hudson says some key people were never interviewed.

“I believe there’s somebody out there that’s in her circle, in her social media circle, that may know what happened to her and hasn’t come forward for whatever reason,” Hudson said. Hudson says the original detective skipped parts of the social media search.

“We always look at that. Why it wasn’t done at the time, I can’t answer that. I can tell you it’s been done now,” Hudson said.

“I don’t know if I can explain the level of powerlessness I felt,” Laurie said. From the balloons at Chalamount Park, to the interstate that connects city to city and state to state —

“The biggest fear is that we will never know,” Michael said.

–The clock will keep ticking, and Ebby’s family will keep praying for an end.

“I just want closure,” Laurie said.

–No matter the road it takes.

Ebby’s parents have both taken polygraphs. Sources say both parents passed. Hudson says the parents are not suspects.

Little Rock Police are still asking for tips regarding the case. If you know anything about what happened to Ebby Steppach, you’re asked to give them a call.