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Cindy expected to drench Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia

Photo: DAVID_GRUNFELD, AP

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Wth a rising tide, strong southerly winds from Tropical Depression Cindy lash the lakefront Thursday, June 22, 2017 in Mandeville, La. (David Grunfeld/NOLA.com The Times-Picayune via AP)

Wth a rising tide, strong southerly winds from Tropical Depression Cindy lash the lakefront Thursday, June 22, 2017 in Mandeville, La. (David Grunfeld/NOLA.com The Times-Picayune via AP)

Photo: DAVID_GRUNFELD, AP

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Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Photo: Rick Hickman, AP

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A police officer stands guard after a possible tornado touched down destroying several businesses, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Fairfield, Ala. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey says the threat of severe weather has not concluded as the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy pushes inland. Ivey in a Thursday press briefing urged people to stay vigilant. A possible tornado touched down destroying several businesses, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Fairfield, Ala. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey says the threat of severe weather has not concluded as the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy pushes inland. Ivey in a Thursday press briefing urged people to stay vigilant.

A mailbox sticks out of water during neighborhood flooding after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. A mailbox sticks out of water during neighborhood flooding after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Photo: Gerald Herbert, AP

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A car drives through a partially submerged roadway after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. A car drives through a partially submerged roadway after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Photo: Gerald Herbert, AP

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Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Photo: Rick Hickman, AP

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Jordan Fortune, 3, laughs as a wave churned up by Tropical Depression Cindy hits a sea wall at the harbor in Pass Christian, Miss., on Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Jordan Fortune, 3, laughs as a wave churned up by Tropical Depression Cindy hits a sea wall at the harbor in Pass Christian, Miss., on Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Photo: Jay Reeves, AP

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A house alongside State Highway 87 sits on a small island after Tropical Storm Cindy brought high tides as it made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP) Crews work to clear sand and debris from State Highway 87 after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)( Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle )

Debris covers State Highway 87 after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula in Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle )

Debris covers State Highway 87 after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula in Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle )

Photo: Michael Ciaglo, AP

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In this image taken from video, Erin West walks down a flooded street in her neighborhood after Tropical Storm Cindy, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Ocean Springs, Miss. Persistent drainage problems frustrate residents, some of whom couldn’t drive to work because of the storm, West said, and others are worried about the possibility of alligators coming into their yards in the floodwaters. A man shields himself from the rain while riding his bicycle on the intersection of St. Emmanuel and Leeland streets Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Houston as Tropical Storm Cindy hit Southeast Texas and the Gulf Coast. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Debris is removed after it covered TX-87 as a results of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. ( Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Debris is removed after it covered TX-87 as a results of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. ( Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Elizabeth Conley, AP

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Jeffery Chheang works at Dannay’s Donuts on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. Chheang said the Tropical Storm Cindy seems to have made it slower at the store. “Usually we get families on vacation in, but so far, we’ve really only had locals.” ( Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Tommy Bomar, of High Island, Texas, checks out the waves as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Tommy Bomar, of High Island, Texas, checks out the waves as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Elizabeth Conley, AP

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Water and debris, washed up past the beach by Tropical Storm Cindy, sit on Kahla Drive Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Crystal Beach, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Water and debris, washed up past the beach by Tropical Storm Cindy, sit on Kahla Drive Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Crystal Beach, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Michael Ciaglo, AP

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A woman walks along the beach the morning after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall Thursday, June 22, 2017, on the Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

A woman walks along the beach the morning after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall Thursday, June 22, 2017, on the Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Michael Ciaglo, AP

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Debris covers TX-87 as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Debris covers TX-87 as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Elizabeth Conley, AP

References

  1. ^

Senate’s proposed Medicaid cuts worry Alabama health care providers

Alabama health care organizations and advocacy groups Thursday expressed concerns about possible cuts to Medicaid in the Senate health care bill, saying it could affect hospitals and pediatric offices.

Senate's Proposed Medicaid Cuts Worry Alabama Health Care Providers CLOSESenate's Proposed Medicaid Cuts Worry Alabama Health Care Providers

More than 178,000 Alabamians purchased individual plans on the federal insurance exchange over the winter time. HHS statistics show who’s buying them, where they live and how much they earn. Brian Lyman / Advertiser

Senate's Proposed Medicaid Cuts Worry Alabama Health Care Providers

Michael Reynolds, European Pressphoto Agency Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., says the Republican working group on Obamacare repeal includes all 52 GOP senators, not just the all-male group drafting the legislation. Senate Majority Leader Republican Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., speaks during a news conference alongside Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., on Capitol Hill on May 9, 2017. (Photo: MICHAEL REYNOLDS, Michael Reynolds, European Press)

The Senate version of legislation to repeal the Affordable Care Act appears to make even deeper cuts to federal funding[1] for Medicaid than a version that passed the U.S. House of Representatives in May. That could mean trouble for Alabama s health care system, which relies on Medicaid.

Our initial impressions are that it s going to be devastating for Alabama s hospitals, our Medicaid, our health care delivery system, said Danne Howard, executive vice president and chief policy officer for the Alabama Hospital Association. Requests for comment were sent on Thursday to the offices of U.S. Sens. Richard Shelby and Luther Strange, both R-Alabama. Medicaid covers over 1 million Alabamians, despite strict coverage requirements. Childless able-bodied adults almost never qualify. Parents of children eligible for Medicaid can receive benefits if they make 18 percent of the poverty line about $3,629 a year. The program chiefly covers children who make up more than half of recipients the elderly and the disabled. The program covers about half the births in the state and plays a major role keeping hospitals open and pediatricians seeing patients.

Senate's Proposed Medicaid Cuts Worry Alabama Health Care ProvidersBuy Photo

Photos by Mickey Welsh / Advertiser Dr. Cathy Wood works with young patients at her practice, Partners in Pediatrics, in Montgomery on Wednesday. Dr. Cathy Wood works with young patients at her practice, Partners in Pediatrics, in Montgomery, Ala, on Wednesday June 24, 2015. (Photo: Mickey Welsh / Advertiser)

A large portion of their practice is Medicaid, said Dr. Cathy Wood, president of the Alabama chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. It s getting harder and harder to provide care in rural communities generally, just because of medicine in general. Take away the financial security of saying these patients are going to be funded, and you re going to get fewer and fewer. The federal government and the state split the costs of the program. The state has struggled to pay for its share, due to rising costs and legislators unwillingness or inability to raise taxes or create new revenues for the General Fund. But the federal match is generous: Alabama gets about $2.35 from the federal government for every state dollar it spends. The Alabama Medicaid Agency says the state in fiscal year 2015 received $4.1 billion from the federal government for the program. The bills in Congress would drop the match and replace it with a per capita block grant that would provide a fixed amount of money per enrollee. The House version would have used 2016 as a baseline, which could cut funding to the state because Alabama already spends less on Medicaid than other states and did not take a Medicaid expansion.

The Congressional Budget Office has yet to score the bill and its specific effects. According to The Washington Post[2], the Senate version would put the block grants in place in 2021 and would allow them to grow more slowly than the House version, which could mean deeper cuts. The loss of federal money would require the Alabama Legislature to raise taxes to replace the lost funds, or reduce services. The Republican-controlled bodies have never shown any willingness to increase taxes[3]. That would likely mean cuts to the program[4], which could extend waiting times for patients, even those with private insurance, and lead to closures of hospitals and primary care practices, particularly in rural areas that count on Medicaid.

Senate's Proposed Medicaid Cuts Worry Alabama Health Care ProvidersBuy Photo

Alabama House of Representatives gather during the legislative special session on Tuesday, August 23, 2016, at the State House in Montgomery, Ala. (Photo: Albert Cesare / Advertiser, Albert Cesare / Advertiser)

Kimble Forrister, executive director of Alabama Arise, a group which works on poverty issues, called the bill bad for Alabama and bad for America in a statement.

The Senate bill would be devastating for children, seniors, working families, and people with disabilities across Alabama, the statement said. This mean-spirited plan would slash Medicaid and force millions of low and middle-income Americans to pay more for insurance that covers less. Howard said with few services offered by Alabama Medicaid already, the state would have to cut reimbursements to doctors in Medicaid or adult prescription services, which she called unconscionable.

Strange and his opponents in this summer s Senate primary have, for the most part, expressed wariness[5] about block granting Medicaid but not said if that would be a deal killer for them. Wood said providers were uneasy at the thought of Montgomery having fewer dollars for health care, and more control over how it s spent.

It seems like if you had federal participation the way we had it, there was some security there, she said. It made us feel like OK, we can scratch here. The federal government holds the state government accountable. Now it may not.

Read or Share this story: http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/politics/southunionstreet/2017/06/22/senates-proposed-medicaid-cuts-worry-alabama-health-care-providers/421824001/

References

  1. ^ appears to make even deeper cuts to federal funding (www.montgomeryadvertiser.com)
  2. ^ to The Washington Post (www.washingtonpost.com)
  3. ^ never shown any willingness to increase taxes (www.montgomeryadvertiser.com)
  4. ^ cuts to the program (www.montgomeryadvertiser.com)
  5. ^ expressed wariness (www.montgomeryadvertiser.com)

Shotgun Willie’s bar shooting suspect gets a $75000 bond

Dewayne Wheat Mobile

A Mobile District Court Judge issued a $75,000 bond for 35-year-old Dewayne Wheat who is facing a murder charge in the death of security guard at a bar in Mobile. The bond hearing took place in front of Judge George Hardesty on Thursday morning. Wheat was arrested and charged with murder on Tuesday (June 20) afternoon. The Mobile Police Department identified Wheat as the shooter in the death of 40-year-old Jeremy Scott earlier that morning.

Police said Scott, who worked as a security guard at Shotgun Willie’s[1] bar, was shot multiple times around 4:15 a.m. on Tuesday morning. The bar is located at 2605 Halls Mill Road. Police said Scott was pronounced dead at the scene. Wheat remains in jail at this time and a date for his next court hearing has not been set at this time.

References

  1. ^ Shotgun Willie’s (www.al.com)
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