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Irving, James lead Cavaliers past Knicks, 119-104

Carmelo Anthony was still a member of the New York Knicks when he awoke from his afternoon nap Thursday. Once the game started, the Cleveland Cavaliers made sure the Knicks’ nightmarish season continued. LeBron James recorded his 48th career triple-double and Kyrie Irving scored 23 points, leading the Cavaliers to a 119-104 victory over the Knicks, who hung on to Anthony and Derrick Rose at the trade deadline.

James scored 18 points and had 13 rebounds with 15 assists for his sixth triple-double of the season. Anthony, the subject of trade rumors because of a strained relationship with Knicks President of Basketball Operations Phil Jackson, scored 20 points, going 9 of 25 from the field.

“I’m at peace,” Anthony said. “I’ve been at peace. I’m happy I won’t be talking about trades or any of this stuff the rest of the season.”

Anthony anticipated he would remain with the Knicks.

“Nobody likes to be in limbo, especially when it’s involving you, but that’s not the way it is in this sport,” he said. “Obviously, we all knew kind of what was going on out there, but nothing happened.”

Kyle Korver scored 20 points for Cleveland, which is 8-1 in February and has beaten New York 10 straight times. The defending NBA champions were 7-8 in January.

“We got back to playing our type of basketball,” James said. “I’ve always felt good about our team, but it was just about the way we were playing. I feel really good about the way we’re playing right now.”

Courtney Lee had 25 points for New York, which has lost six of seven and is 12th in the Eastern Conference playoff race. Knicks forward Kristaps Porzingis, the team’s second-leading scorer, left the game with a sprained right ankle in the second quarter and didn’t return. He left the arena in a walking boot and will be re-examined Friday.

New York took an early lead in the first game since the All-Star break for both teams, but the Cavaliers closed the first half on a 25-8 run. Cleveland built the lead to 72-51, but Anthony scored eight points in the third quarter and kept New York in the game. The Knicks trailed 87-79 entering the fourth, but the Cavaliers quickly regained control. James scored on two layups while Korver and Channing Frye each hit two 3-pointers, pushing the lead to 110-91.

“The rest paid dividends for us,” James said. “A couple of possessions guys got a little tired because we hadn’t played in a week, but it was a good start for us after the break.”

James, who had eight assists in the fourth, also turned in two outstanding defensive plays. He swatted Rose’s layup attempt into the courtside seats in the second quarter and pinned Lee’s breakaway drive against the backboard in the fourth. Rose, another subject of trade rumors as the deadline approached, scored 13 points.

TIP-INS

Knicks: C Joakim Noah (sore left hamstring) traveled with the team to Cleveland, but coach Jeff Hornacek said no timetable has been set for his return to action. … Lee has been battling an illness, but has stayed in the lineup despite not being fully healthy. Cavaliers: James’ missed layup earlier in the quarter fooled the arena PA announcer, who began calling the four-time MVP’s name as the ball spun out. …. Irving missed a free throw in the second quarter, snapping a streak of 29 made foul shots in a row. OAKLEY RETURNS

Former Knicks forward Charles Oakley watched his former team in his hometown. Oakley sat next to Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert in a front row seat adjacent to Cleveland’s bench.

Oakley attended his first Knicks game since being arrested after getting into an altercation with security guards at Madison Square Garden earlier this month.

“It’s always great to see him,” James said. “He’s like an uncle of mine.”

MOVES UPCOMING

The Cavaliers were quiet at the deadline, but general manager David Griffin is expected to add at least one player soon. Veteran point guard Deron Williams is available after being waived by Dallas on Thursday. UP NEXT

Knicks: Host Philadelphia on Saturday night. Cavaliers: Host Chicago on Saturday night.

Sullivan talks health care with Alaska business leaders as protesters …

Alaska News[1]

U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, speaks to the Alaska Chamber during a roundtable discussion about the Affordable Care Act on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, at the Petroleum Club Anchorage. (Bill Roth / Alaska Dispatch News)

Republican U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan met with state business leaders in Anchorage on Wednesday to discuss the embattled Affordable Care Act, as protesters rallied outside with calls to keep the health care law intact. About 40 protesters gathered in front of a Midtown office building as Sullivan spoke with members of the Alaska Chamber at a “roundtable” discussion of the health care law held at the exclusive Petroleum Club of Anchorage on the first floor. Sullivan said after the meeting that he’d heard plenty of concerns from those in attendance about the impact of the ACA, which the GOP-led Congress has vowed to repeal or replace.

“The big thing I heard from this group is they’re very dissatisfied with the current law,” Sullivan said. “It has driven up costs dramatically.”

As the meeting got underway, protesters chanted and marched around the side of the building. A security guard stood in the building’s arctic entryway. The protest was organized by the Alaska affiliate of “Protect Our Care,” a national group pushing to protect the Affordable Care Act, said organizer Andre Horton. Organizing for Action and the Alaska Nurses Association also coordinated the rally, he said.

Sullivan Talks Health Care With Alaska Business Leaders As Protesters ...

Activists march and encourage Sen. Dan Sullivan not to repeal the Affordable Care Act on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as he speaks to the Alaska Chamber during a roundtable discussion at the Petroleum Club Anchorage. (Bill Roth / Alaska Dispatch News)

Madeleine Grant, a doctor with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, said she was protesting because she had seen the catastrophic damage that can occur when people are uninsured during her previous positions at community health centers.

“I’ve seen people go bankrupt, not get diagnosed, die, go blind, because they didn’t have have health care, so this is very real to me,” Grant said. Mark Simon, a statewide supervisor for Organizing for Action, said protesting was important because “this event specifically seems to be part of a larger national trend among congressmen to not be really holding town hall(s). A lot of people were hoping for town hall events, a chance for us to come out to talk to our senators.”

Wednesday’s meeting wasn’t open to the public; Alaska Chamber president and CEO Curtis Thayer told reporters they could attend if they only quoted Sullivan, and not attendees.

The “town hall” movement is part of a nationwide push by liberal groups that are organizing local events and pushing lawmakers to hold town hall events, where constituents can confront their lawmakers in person. Such events held in other states have recently grown raucous[2], with lawmakers confronted by angry constituents. When asked why not, Sullivan replied that he considered events like Wednesday’s meeting with the Alaska Chamber the statewide chamber of commerce to be a town hall.

“I do town halls, constructive town halls, all the time, that are targeted with specific issues,” Sullivan said.

“I respect their First Amendment rights to protest,” Sullivan said of Wednesday’s demonstration. “And if they’re interested in a constructive dialogue they should reach out to my office, they should give us their ideas. But being invited to a forum just to be shouted down is not constructive and it’s not respectful to the people who have issues and want to have a good discussion.”

Sullivan said that since late December, he has met with hundreds of Alaskans, from physicians to insurance companies and Alaska Native health care organizations, all of which have different views of the law. Earlier Wednesday, he had met with union officials, during which the Affordable Care Act was also discussed, he said. Sullivan said he would like to “repeal and repair” the health care law enacted by former President Barack Obama in 2010.

“Doing nothing right now, in my view, is not an option,” he said.

Separately, Sen. Lisa Murkowski told legislators[3] Wednesday that she would not support “a reckless repeal process” for the health care law. Several versions of a reworked Affordable Care Act are circulating in Congress. Sullivan said he was seeing consensus that children still be allowed to stay on their parents’ health care plan until they are 26, and that pre-existing conditions remain covered. Pre-existing conditions were an “issue of fairness,” Sullivan said, which lawmakers would need to find a way to make pencil out.

Alaska, with its challenges of high health care costs, a small population and many rural residents, was “ground zero” for failures of the Affordable Care Act, Sullivan said. He said he’s heard a lot about the impending Cadillac Tax a 40 percent excise tax meant to apply to only the highest-cost plans, but which would affect a majority[4] of plans in Alaska as well as issues of pricing transparency for medical services. Legislators and Anchorage lawmakers are pursuing their own bills[5] involving price transparency. By 5:30 p.m., the protesters were leaving as the meeting inside continued. They said they planned to return to the building Thursday, when Alaska Rep. Don Young would be holding a fundraising event, also at the Petroleum Club.

For more newsletters click here

References

  1. ^ Alaska News (www.adn.com)
  2. ^ recently grown raucous (www.npr.org)
  3. ^ told legislators (www.adn.com)
  4. ^ but which would affect a majority (www.adn.com)
  5. ^ are pursuing their own bills (www.adn.com)

Sen. Dan Sullivan talks health care with Alaska business leaders as protesters rally outside

Politics[1]

U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan, R-Alaska, speaks to the Alaska Chamber during a roundtable discussion about the Affordable Care Act on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, at the Petroleum Club Anchorage. (Bill Roth / Alaska Dispatch News)

Republican U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan met with state business leaders in Anchorage on Wednesday to discuss the embattled Affordable Care Act, as protesters rallied outside with calls to keep the health care law intact. About 40 protesters gathered in front of a Midtown office building as Sullivan spoke with members of the Alaska Chamber at a “roundtable” discussion of the health care law held at the exclusive Petroleum Club of Anchorage on the first floor. Sullivan said after the meeting that he’d heard plenty of concerns from those in attendance about the impact of the ACA, which the GOP-led Congress has vowed to repeal or replace.

“The big thing I heard from this group is they’re very dissatisfied with the current law,” Sullivan said. “It has driven up costs dramatically.”

As the meeting got underway, protesters chanted and marched around the side of the building. A security guard stood in the building’s arctic entryway. The protest was organized by the Alaska affiliate of “Protect Our Care,” a national group pushing to protect the Affordable Care Act, said organizer Andre Horton. Organizing for Action and the Alaska Nurses Association also coordinated the rally, he said.

Sen. Dan Sullivan Talks Health Care With Alaska Business Leaders As Protesters Rally Outside

Activists march and encourage Sen. Dan Sullivan not to repeal the Affordable Care Act on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017, as he speaks to the Alaska Chamber during a roundtable discussion at the Petroleum Club Anchorage. (Bill Roth / Alaska Dispatch News)

Madeleine Grant, a doctor with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, said she was protesting because she had seen the catastrophic damage that can occur when people are uninsured.

“I’ve seen people go bankrupt, not get diagnosed, die, go blind, because they didn’t have have health care, so this is very real to me,” Grant said. Mark Simon, a statewide supervisor for Organizing for Action, said protesting was important because “this event specifically seems to be part of a larger national trend among congressmen to not be really holding town hall(s). A lot of people were hoping for town hall events, a chance for us to come out to talk to our senators.”

Wednesday’s meeting wasn’t open to the public; Alaska Chamber president and CEO Curtis Thayer told reporters they could attend if they only quoted Sullivan, and not attendees.

The “town hall” movement is part a nationwide push by liberal groups that are organizing local events and pushing lawmakers to hold town hall events, where constituents can confront their lawmakers in person. Such events held in other states have recently grown raucous[2], with lawmakers confronted by angry constituents. When asked why not, Sullivan replied that he considered events like Wednesday’s meeting with the Alaska Chamber the statewide chamber of commerce to be a town hall.

“I do town halls, constructive town halls, all the time, that are targeted with specific issues,” Sullivan said.

“I respect their First Amendment rights to protest,” Sullivan said of Wednesday’s demonstration. “And if they’re interested in a constructive dialogue they should reach out to my office, they should give us their ideas. But being invited to a forum just to be shouted down is not constructive and it’s not respectful to the people who have issues and want to have a good discussion.”

Sullivan said that since late December, he has met with hundreds of Alaskans, from physicians to insurance companies and Alaska Native health care organizations, all of which have different views of the law. Earlier Wednesday, he had met with union officials, during which the Affordable Care Act was also discussed, he said. Sullivan said he would like to “repeal and repair” the health care law enacted by former President Barack Obama in 2010.

“Doing nothing right now, in my view, is not an option,” he said.

Separately, Sen. Lisa Murkowski told legislators[3] Wednesday that she would not support “a reckless repeal process” for the health care law. Several versions of a reworked Affordable Care Act are circulating in Congress. Sullivan said he was seeing consensus that children still be allowed to stay on their parents’ health care plan until they are 26, and that pre-existing conditions remain covered. Pre-existing conditions were an “issue of fairness,” Sullivan said, which lawmakers would need to find a way to make pencil out.

Alaska, with its challenges of high health care costs, a small population and many rural residents, was “ground zero” for failures of the Affordable Care Act, Sullivan said. He said he’s heard a lot about the impending Cadillac Tax a 40 percent excise tax meant to apply to only the highest-cost plans, but which would affect a majority[4] of plans in Alaska as well as issues of pricing transparency for medical services. Legislators and Anchorage lawmakers are pursuing their own bills[5] involving price transparency. By 5:30 p.m., the protesters were leaving as the meeting inside continued. They said they planned to return to the building Thursday, when Alaska Rep. Don Young would be holding a fundraising event, also at the Petroleum Club.

For more newsletters click here

References

  1. ^ Politics (www.adn.com)
  2. ^ recently grown raucous (www.npr.org)
  3. ^ told legislators (www.adn.com)
  4. ^ but which would affect a majority (www.adn.com)
  5. ^ are pursuing their own bills (www.adn.com)
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