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Donald Trump mounted an aggressive defense of his presidency Thursday, lambasting reports that his campaign advisers had inappropriate contact with Russian officials and vowing to crack down on the leaking of classified information

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Donald Trump mounted an aggressive defense of his presidency Thursday, lambasting reports that his campaign advisers had inappropriate contact with Russian officials and vowing to crack down on the leaking of classified information

More >>[2]

References

  1. ^ More >> (www.waow.com)
  2. ^ More >> (www.waow.com)

Homeland Security chief: No use of military for deportations

Josh Lederman, Associated Press

Updated 7:35 pm, Thursday, February 23, 2017

Photo: Carlos Barria, AP

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Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, right, accompanied by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, speaks at the Mexican Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Mexico City, Mexico, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP) Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly speaks during a joint statement to the press by U.S. and Mexican officials at the Foreign Affairs Ministry in Mexico City, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Mexico’s mounting unease and resentment over President Donald Trump’s immigration crackdown are looming over a Thursday meeting between Kelly, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, and Mexican leaders that the U.S. had hoped would project a strong future for relations between neighbors. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson listens at right as Mexico’s Foreign Secretary Videgaray speaks after a meeting at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Mexico City, Mexico, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP) Secretary of State Rex Tillerson speaks at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Mexico City, Mexico, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, following a meeting with Mexico’s Foreign Secretary Videgaray. (Carlos Barria/Pool Photo via AP) U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, left, shakes hands with Mexico’s Foreign Relations Secretary Luis Videgaray after a joint statement to the press at the Foreign Affairs Ministry in Mexico City, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017. Mexico’s mounting unease and resentment over President Donald Trump’s immigration crackdown are looming over a Thursday meeting between Tillerson, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, and Mexican leaders that the U.S. had hoped would project a strong future for relations between neighbors.

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MEXICO CITY (AP) Seeking to tamp down growing unease in Latin America, U.S. Homeland Security[11] Secretary John Kelly[12] pledged Thursday that the United States won’t enlist its military to enforce immigration laws and that there will be “no mass deportations.”

Only hours earlier, President Donald Trump[13] suggested the opposite. He told CEOs at the White House the deportation push was a “military operation.”

Kelly, speaking in Mexico’s capital, said all deportations will comply with human rights requirements and the U.S. legal system, including its multiple appeals for those facing deportation. He said the U.S. approach will involve “close coordination” with Mexico’s government.

“There will be no use of military forces in immigration,” Kelly said. “There will be no repeat, no mass deportations.”

Yet while Kelly and U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson[14] tried to alleviate Mexico’s concerns, Trump was fanning them further, with tough talk about “getting really bad dudes out of this country at a rate nobody has ever seen before.”

“It’s a military operation,” Trump said Thursday while his envoys were in Mexico City. “Because what has been allowed to come into our country, when you see gang violence that you’ve read about like never before and all of the things, much of that is people who are here illegally.”

It was an altogether different message from Kelly and Tillerson, who traveled here to meet with top Mexican officials at a time of intense turbulence for U.S.-Mexico relations. Indeed, Trump acknowledged he had sent his top diplomat south of the border on a “tough trip.”

In contrast to Trump, Tillerson and Kelly emphasized a U.S. commitment to work closely with Mexico on border security, illegal immigration and trafficking of drugs and weapons issues Trump has made a central focus of his young presidency, much to Mexico’s dismay. Both Tillerson and Kelly appeared to downplay any major rift between the U.S. and Mexico.

“In a relationship filled with vibrant colors, two strong sovereign countries from time to time will have differences,” Tillerson said. “We listened closely and carefully to each other as we respectfully and patiently raised our respective concerns.”

For Mexico, that patience was running short.

Foreign Relations Secretary Luis Videgaray[15] noted the “public and notorious differences” between the countries and said the Mexicans had raised the “legal impossibility” of a government making “unilateral” decisions affecting another country. Videgaray has previously raised the prospect Mexico could seek recourse at the United Nations or elsewhere for U.S. moves violating international law.

“It is an evident fact that Mexicans feel concern and irritation over what are perceived as policies that may hurt Mexicans and the national interest of Mexicans here and abroad,” Videgaray said.

The divergent tones from Trump and from his Cabinet officials left Mexico with an uncomfortable decision about whom to believe. Throughout Trump’s first weeks, foreign leaders have grown increasingly skeptical as Trump’s envoys deliver soothing messages that are then negated by the president.

Mexico has been incensed that the U.S. announced without Mexico’s sign-off that people caught crossing the border illegally will be sent back to Mexico even those from third countries who have no connection to Mexico. Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong[16], Kelly’s Mexican counterpart, said that concern had come up Thursday, too.

Both countries said it was positive that the neighbors remained committed to working through the disputes diplomatically, though there were no indications they were any closer to a resolution. As the Americans wrapped up their Mexico visit, they remained at odds with their hosts over the deportations and over the massive border wall Trump has vowed to construct at Mexico’s expense.

Trump spoke during the presidential campaign about using a “deportation force.” His Homeland Security Department at one point considered using the National Guard[17] to help with deportations, although the White House has said that idea has been ruled out.

The Homeland Security Department didn’t immediately respond to requests to clarify why Trump’s remark about “a military operation” had conflicted with that of Kelly, who blamed the media for “misreporting.” At the White House, spokesman Sean Spicer[18] said Trump hadn’t been speaking literally. He said Trump used the “military operation” phrase “as an adjective” to describe the precision with which immigration enforcement was being carried out.

Tillerson and Kelly also met behind closed doors with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto[19] before returning to Washington. Pena Nieto recently canceled a trip to Washington over Trump’s insistence that Mexico pay for the wall. It has not been rescheduled.

In addition to sending border-crossers from third countries into Mexico, new memos signed by Kelly this week call for prioritizing deportation for anyone charged or convicted of any crime, rather than just serious crimes. That potentially subjects millions in the U.S. illegally to deportation, many Mexicans included.

Those policies have stoked fears in Mexico about the possibility of deportee and refugee camps emerging along Mexico’s northern border. Mexican officials were also apprehensive that a forthcoming report ordered by Trump’s administration listing all current U.S. aid to Mexico is intended to threaten Mexico into compliance over immigration or the wall.

Mexico has also raised concerns about Trump’s pledge to overhaul the trade relationship and possibly apply steep taxes to Mexican products, a move with profound impacts for Mexico’s export-heavy economy. Tillerson said the leaders had agreed the trade relationship needed to be modernized and strengthened.

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Associated Press writer Mark Stevenson[20] in Mexico City and Jonathan Lemire[21] in New York contributed to this report.

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Reach Josh Lederman on Twitter at http://twitter.com/joshledermanAP[22]

References

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Syracuse upsets No. 10 Duke with John Gillon’s buzzer-beating banked 3

The season of comebacks was on the precipice of another. With two minutes and 20 seconds left, a security guard warned fans in courtside seats to be aware of a possible court storming, Syracuse s third of the season. With eight seconds left, Tyler Lydon passed the ball to Tyus Battle. Battle then lobbed it to John Gillon, who caught it with 4.4 seconds left. Gillon hadn t realized how little time was left. He looked up at the clock and knew he had to sprint down the court.

I was like, Alright, I gotta go make a play, Gillon said. He stopped at the 3-point line in the tied game. There was only time for one shot. The Orange had been in this position before. He beat the buzzer to force overtime against North Carolina State. Battle beat the buzzer against Clemson.

Lydon rushed to get the offensive rebound. Gillon didn t know if it d go in when it left his hand. Assistant coach Gerry McNamara screamed, Bank! Bank! Bank! from the sideline because he saw it was going long. The shot hit off the backboard and fell through the basket. Syracuse beat Duke. 78-75.

I m going to try and be a stone-cold killer every game, Gillon said.

Syracuse Upsets No. 10 Duke With John Gillon's Buzzer-beating Banked 3
Jessica Sheldon | Staff Photographer

The win over No. 10 Duke (22-6, 10-5 Atlantic Coast) provides a massive boost to Syracuse s (17-12, 9-7) NCAA Tournament resume. Wednesday night marked SU s third Top 10 win of the season. Each previous time, students stormed the court. They did it again after 11 ties and 16 lead changes, none more dramatic than the final one. Gillon didn t sub out once and finished with 26 points on 9-of-14 shooting and six assists. His ability to drive and score, which he showed more and more as the game went on, is the reason he took over midseason as Syracuse s starting point guard. After committing five turnovers in each of the past two games, both losses, Gillon committed zero on Wednesday.

We go as John Gillon goes, Syracuse head coach Jim Boeheim said. After joining the ACC in 2013-14, Syracuse and Duke played two of the most memorable games in recent SU history. In the first matchup that year, the Orange beat the Blue Devils in overtime. Gillon s high school teammate Rasheed Sulaimon hit a buzzer-beater that tied the game at the end of regulation. The two talked last night. Gillon told Sulaimon he d kill Duke for him.

Gillon wowed the buzzing Dome crowd with under five minutes left in the first half by crossing over multiple times leading to Jayson Tatum tumbling to the floor. Gillon backpedaled and nailed a 3. As he walked back on defense, his facial expression didn t change. It was the kind of play he was used to making at Arkansas-Little Rock and Colorado State against weaker competition. But this was Duke, the 10th-ranked team in the country with the seventh most efficient offense nationwide, per Kenpom.com. On the Blue Devils next possession, Tatum, the future first-round NBA draft pick, hit a mid-range jumper. Syracuse trailed by eight and eventually as much as 10. The two teams traded body blow after body blow all game. The team with the ball last would be in the best position to win.

For the seventh straight game, Syracuse faced a double-digit deficit. It was used to being in that position and the combination of Battle and Gillon exploded in the second half and combined for 44 points.

This team keeps fighting, Boeheim said.

Syracuse Upsets No. 10 Duke With John Gillon's Buzzer-beating Banked 3
Jessica Sheldon | Staff Photographer

Gillon, in particular, has seemingly bounced back every time. After zero points in back-to-back games against North Florida and Connecticut, he scored 23 against Boston University. He followed up a zero-point performance against Notre Dame by leading SU down the stretch against Wake Forest in its first ACC single-digit win. On Sunday, Gillon had his worst game of the season. He went 2-for-10 from the field with three assists and five costly turnovers. Each time he touched the ball, Georgia Tech fans berated him with air ball chants. Now, Gillon s resilience has sparked Syracuse s in a season that nearly slipped away.

How do you come back from a horrible game and then do that? It s special and underrated, Gillon s mother, Phyllis, said via text message. (Boeheim) didn t get down on John after the Georgia Tech game. Do fans really think players want to play poorly? They are trying to miss shots? That belief bore fruit. The outcome you saw tonight. Gillon s first-ever buzzer-beater came in a fourth grade AAU tournament. About 50 people witnessed the shot. His friends jumped on him. Wednesday s buzzer-beater came in front of nearly 30,281 more people. In the locker room after the game, an equipment manager held Gillon s jersey. He showed it to a security guard before putting it in the laundry.

The transition from a motion-type offense to a pick-and-roll-type offense took time. Four new players in a starting lineup did too. And Gillon didn t get off to a hot start Wednesday, either. In the final 13 minutes, he scored 12 of his 26 points. He reached the second level of Duke s defense consistently and finished.

Once I get a little taste of blood and I score, I just get addicted to it.

The instant classic s final shot cued another court storming. Another Top 10 win. Another gasp of breath for Syracuse s once-lost season.

Published on February 22, 2017[1] at 10:50 pm

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References

  1. ^ February 22, 2017 (dailyorange.com)
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