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In Massachusetts’ failing mental health care system, even the lucky …

James Boyd Jr. was supposed to be one of the fortunate ones. Within Massachusetts broken mental health care system, he was among those sick enough to be named clients of the state Department of Mental Health. State workers, accordingly, were tasked with watching over Boyd, who had chronic paranoid schizophrenia, and keeping him safe.

Yet just before sunrise one morning last August, he sat naked on a bench at a South End mental health center. The 49-year-old was agitated and had just gone to the bathroom outside the building, according to an internal state report obtained by the Globe. Boyd had been released from a hospital psychiatric unit just days earlier, and it was clear to his immediate caregivers that he still required inpatient care, the report shows. But after two facilities refused to take him a common problem for people with serious mental illness the Department of Mental Health opted to keep Boyd in a less secure residential program that allowed him the freedom to come and go.

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Boyd was jumpy after a night on the streets, and after spending days before that trying to get admitted to local emergency rooms. When he heard a nearby security officer call 911, he apparently got spooked and left Solomon Carter Fuller Mental Health Center.

A failed patchwork of resources

Those most ill, including people at risk of committing violence, are far too often left in the care of almost anyone except the professionals that could help. Half a block up East Newton Street, a car struck him. Boston police found him writhing in pain in a crosswalk, with severe lacerations to his back and scrapes on his head, legs, and arms, according to the police report. He was pronounced dead at Boston Medical Center at 6:37 a.m. on Aug. 24.

A depleted state system fails many with serious mental illness

James Boyd Jr. was supposed to be one of the fortunate ones. Within Massachusetts broken mental health care system, he was among those sick enough to be named clients of the state Department of Mental Health. State workers, accordingly, were tasked with watching over Boyd, who had chronic paranoid schizophrenia, and keeping him safe.

Yet just before sunrise one morning last August, he sat naked on a bench at a South End mental health center. The 49-year-old was agitated and had just gone to the bathroom outside the building, according to an internal state report obtained by the Globe. Boyd had been released from a hospital psychiatric unit just days earlier, and it was clear to his immediate caregivers that he still required inpatient care, the report shows. But after two facilities refused to take him a common problem for people with serious mental illness the Department of Mental Health opted to keep Boyd in a less secure residential program that allowed him the freedom to come and go.

Get Fast Forward in your inbox: Forget yesterday’s news. Get what you need today in this early-morning email.

Boyd was jumpy after a night on the streets, and after spending days before that trying to get admitted to local emergency rooms. When he heard a nearby security officer call 911, he apparently got spooked and left Solomon Carter Fuller Mental Health Center.

A failed patchwork of resources

Those most ill, including people at risk of committing violence, are far too often left in the care of almost anyone except the professionals that could help. Half a block up East Newton Street, a car struck him. Boston police found him writhing in pain in a crosswalk, with severe lacerations to his back and scrapes on his head, legs, and arms, according to the police report. He was pronounced dead at Boston Medical Center at 6:37 a.m. on Aug. 24.

Keys Coast Guard hosts Caribbean partners

When it comes to combating transnational criminal organizations in the Caribbean and securing America s borders, the cooperation with partner nations thrives, the U.S. Coast Guard says. This relationship was tangible as representatives from Jamaica, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, St. Kitts and Nevis, Bahamas, and the United States gathered at U.S. Coast Guard Sector Key West earlier this month to exchange ideas, best practices and maintenance concepts for short-range patrol craft and coastal security boats.

Every time we gather with our partners, we walk away with a greater awareness of the challenges each one faces when it comes to ship s maintenance. said Lt. Cmdr. Sonia Miller, a supply and logistics officer with the Royal Bahamas Defense Force.

We are a multi-mission service much like the U.S. Coast Guard, said Lt. Cmdr. Rajesh Boodoo, an engineering officer with the Trinidad and Tobago Coast Guard. The exchange of ideas and knowledge between all our partners is critical to effectively combat drug and human trafficking but also improves our abilities in search and rescue, and coastal security operations. Standardization was an evident theme at the gathering as U.S. Coast Guard representatives discussed and shared lessons learned from initiatives in their service. Standards for training, maintenance and logistics procedures eliminate confusion when members transfer between units, said one of the U.S. Coast Guard officers participating in the exchange.

The U.S. Coast Guard Western Hemisphere Strategy cites globalization as a driving force for greater interdependence among nations and regions to combat drug-related violence and trafficking, and terrorism.

This was provided by U.S. Coast Guard District 7 s Lt. Cmdr. Ryan P. Kelley.

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