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2nd-graders shower beloved security guard with hugs before summer

On the last day of school at Mount Paran Christian School in Cobb County, Georgia, a group of 2nd-graders couldn t wait to show their admiration for their beloved school security guard, Jonathan Broaxnax.

The students crossed the street to shower Broaxnax with hugs and high-fives, a heartwarming moment caught on the school s security camera.

I’ve got to tell you, it made me feel so good, Broaxnax, 63, told ABC News[1]. Not only because they did that, but because it s what this school is all about. It s a Christian school and they instill that into these kids.

The military veteran, who now works for the Chesley Brown International security company, said the children s kind gesture was particularly special for him in light of the recent attack on a concert in Manchester, England, where many children were in attendance.

They re young but they re seeing it on TV and they wonder Why? and What the heck is going on? and Can that happen to me at my little school?, he explained. They were saying things like, Thank you for protecting us, thank you so much Mr. Jonathan, thank you for keeping us safe. You can t hear the sound on the video, but that was what they were actually saying. Oh man I tell you if the video ran just a little bit longer, you would see me run inside and cry.

Broadnax said out of all the jobs he s had in his life, working with these kids is by far the most fulfilling.

I ve been in the military for 22 years, I ve been to the Gulf War, I got out of the military and started to work in the prison system in Texas, he recalled. I worked there for about five or six years and then I got into security. Out of all of that, this is the most fulfilling job I have ever had. Easily.

This isn t the first time the students and faculty have showered Broadnax with admiration and affection. He said they were pivotal in helping him through the darkest moment of his life: the death of his son two years ago.

I lost a son while I was working here and this place, everybody here was so incredible, he said. “The support they gave me here was awesome. After I got back from the funeral, the kids came up to me again and each one of them had handwritten cards of condolences. I ve got all those cards at home. That was just so incredible. And I couldn t hold it in. I cried right there.

The school s headmaster, Dr. David Tilley, said Broadnax is cherished on their campus.

He is beloved around here, said Tilley. It s amazing how many people come onto our campus for the very first time and see him and walk into my office before they go anywhere else and say, Let me tell you, the guy who welcomed us at the front gates is one of the most gracious, cordial, hospitable men they ve ever come across. He is warm and kind and loving to anyone he comes across. He is a thrill to have on our campus and he s the first face people see.

But the humble Broadnax takes absolutely no credit for his service to the school, saying simply, It s focused on those kids.

It s focused on how they feel, how they feel safe. And how they re being raised, he said. And what it means for them to attend the Mount Paran Christian School.

References

  1. ^ ABC News (www.yahoo.com)

Tunisian trial opens over beach attack on British tourists

A medicine made from marijuana, without the stuff that gives a high, cut seizures in kids with a severe form of epilepsy in a study that strengthens the case for more research into pot’s possible health benefits

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A medicine made from marijuana, without the stuff that gives a high, cut seizures in kids with a severe form of epilepsy in a study that strengthens the case for more research into pot’s possible health benefits

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References

  1. ^ More >> (www.waow.com)
  2. ^ More >> (www.waow.com)

Jail accused of ignoring "medically-vulnerable" inmate’s pleas before he died

The above video includes footage that may be disturbing to watch.

The family of an Arkansas man is suing the jail he died in, claiming he was denied adequate medical care. Michael Sabbie died in 2015, just days after he was locked up at the bi-state justice center. He had been arrested over a verbal dispute with his wife. Sabbie’s attorney gave CBS News videos from inside the jail that appear to show the state he was in about 12 hours before he was found dead. CBS News hasn’t been able to independently confirm the videos.

Sabbie’s family says the jail knew he had serious medical conditions and failed to get him proper help when he was clearly struggling, reports CBS News correspondent Omar Villafranca. Surveillance video given to CBS News from Sabbie’s attorney appears to show a security guard at the justice center throw Sabbie to the ground.

According to the lawsuit, Sabbie wasn’t feeling well and had stopped to lean against the wall before attempting to enter the booking area to make a phone call.

A second video, taken by a jail employee, purportedly shows what happens after Sabbie is on the floor. He’s held down by six guards and pepper-sprayed, brought to a jail nurse for less than a minute, rinsed off and returned to his cell.

During the nine-and-a-half minute video, Sabbie says he can’t breathe at least 19 times and asks for water.

The next morning, jail guards found the 35-year-old dead on his jail cell floor.

“He is a medically-vulnerable person. So he reported at intake that he had hypertension, diabetes, heart disease and asthma,” said Erik Heipt, who is representing Sabbie’s family in the lawsuit against the jail filed earlier this week.

The suit claims jail staff didn’t give Sabbie his medications, ignored his labored breathing and used excessive force.

LaSalle Corrections runs this privately-owned jail and 17 other facilities across four states.

They said they do not make comments on pending litigation, but told a local news station last October that they comply with Texas Jail Commission standards.

Heipt says the family wants justice and answers for the father of four.

“They want to expose what happened in the hopes that this sort of thing doesn’t happen to anyone else,” Heipt said.

According to jail protocol, somebody was supposed to check on Sabbie every 30 minutes overnight. The suit claims that a guard said she did and then later admitted to lying.

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