News by Professionals 4 Professionals

Nevada

Reference Library – USA – Nevada

Trump’s orders on immigration could shift Mexico’s thinking

A huge surge in detention. Illegal immigrants who came up through Mexico[1] being shipped quickly back to Mexico[2]. National Guard[3] troops arresting illegal immigrants across the West. After years of neglect, immigration enforcement is proving to be a fertile space for action and for speculation, as draft reports leak out of Homeland Security, frightening immigrant rights groups and thrilling President Trump s backers who have longed to see this sort of crackdown. The White House[4] has shot down some of the reports, including a draft memo obtained by The Associated Press that envisioned 100,000 National Guard[5] troops patrolling from Oregon to Louisiana, empowered to arrest illegal immigrants.

There is no effort at all to round up, to utilize the National Guard[6] to round up illegal immigrants, White House[7] press secretary Sean Spicer[8] told reporters last week, responding to the AP report.

Still, Mr. Trump has gotten off the blocks quickly on immigration, issuing a series of executive orders that, if fully carried out, could fundamentally shift the risk calculus for Mexico[9] and for the hundreds of thousands of Central American illegal immigrants who have streamed through that country en route to the U.S. in recent years.

We ve taken historic action to secure the southern border. And I ve ordered the construction of a great border wall, which will start very shortly. And I ve taken decisive action to keep radical Islamic terrorists the hell out of our country, Mr. Trump said Saturday night in Florida, holding a campaign-style rally to take stock of his first month in office. He was deploying Homeland Security Secretary John F. Kelly on Wednesday to Guatemala, source of some of the new surge of illegal immigrant children and families. Mr. Kelly is expected to meet with President Jimmy Morales and observe a return flight of deportees from the U.S. to Guatemala. He ll then travel to Mexico[10], where he and Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson will talk border security and trade with Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto.

Back home in the U.S., Mr. Kelly is dealing with the fallout from a series of raids rounding up illegal immigrants earlier this month.

blog comments powered by [17]

References

  1. ^ Mexico (www.washingtontimes.com)
  2. ^ Mexico (www.washingtontimes.com)
  3. ^ National Guard (www.washingtontimes.com)
  4. ^ White House (www.washingtontimes.com)
  5. ^ National Guard (www.washingtontimes.com)
  6. ^ National Guard (www.washingtontimes.com)
  7. ^ White House (www.washingtontimes.com)
  8. ^ Sean Spicer (www.washingtontimes.com)
  9. ^ Mexico (www.washingtontimes.com)
  10. ^ Mexico (www.washingtontimes.com)
  11. ^ Mexico (www.washingtontimes.com)
  12. ^ Mexico (www.washingtontimes.com)
  13. ^ National Guard (www.washingtontimes.com)
  14. ^ Mr. Spicer (www.washingtontimes.com)
  15. ^ White House (www.washingtontimes.com)
  16. ^ comments powered by Disqus. (disqus.com)
  17. ^ blog comments powered by (disqus.com)

Ice-cold war: Russian icebreakers outnumber US vessels in vital Arctic

Russian President Vladimir Putin[1] not only is lurking in the Middle East and Eastern Europe but also is building up military forces in the expansive Arctic as the U.S. watches. Rep. Duncan Hunter, a California Republican whose House subcommittee oversees Coast Guard policy, said the U.S. is losing the battle for the Arctic and needs to fight back with at least one basic weapon icebreakers to ensure American access. Russia[2] deploys nearly 40, the U.S. only two. The U.S. Coast Guard says it needs three medium and three heavy ice plows but sails only the 1970s Polar Star (heavy) and the 2000 Healy (medium) in what is an increasingly busy and contested region.

Mr. Hunter, chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure subcommittee on Coast Guard and maritime transportation, has been working behind the scenes to help the Coast Guard (which operates on a relatively small $10 billion budget) to press Congress and the White House for more money. He also arranged a marriage between the Coast Guard s ship-buying office and the Navy so that the Coast Guard can reap some of the larger service s expertise. The Coast Guard has not designed and bought a heavy icebreaker in decades.

Russia[3] is working overtime to strengthen its Arctic presence while the U.S. is acting like a bystander and a nation without any similar strategic interests, Mr. Hunter told The Washington Times. With new icebreaking capability, we can exponentially strengthen our presence and guarantee year-round access for reasons of national security, commerce and research. The post-Cold War Arctic has ranked low in regional priorities, but the Pentagon has begun to pay more attention. It issued strategy papers under President Obama. It stripped away various commands that had a piece of the polar north and consolidated full responsibilities to U.S. Northern Command. The Coast Guard, the country s fifth military branch, operates under the Department of Homeland Security.

Coast Guard Vice Adm. Charles W. Ray, deputy commandant for operations, told The Times that the plan is to deliver by 2023 the first heavy icebreaker since the 1970s.

Timely replacement of our one, aging operational heavy icebreaker is vital to the advancement of U.S. interests, Adm. Ray said. We need to maintain a level playing field with other nations that have invested heavily in their national icebreaking capabilities.

blog comments powered by [14]

References

  1. ^ Vladimir Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  2. ^ Russia (www.washingtontimes.com)
  3. ^ Russia (www.washingtontimes.com)
  4. ^ Mr. Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  5. ^ Russia (www.washingtontimes.com)
  6. ^ Mr. Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  7. ^ Russia (www.washingtontimes.com)
  8. ^ Mr. Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  9. ^ Mr. Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  10. ^ Mr. Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  11. ^ Mr. Putin (www.washingtontimes.com)
  12. ^ Russia (www.washingtontimes.com)
  13. ^ comments powered by Disqus. (disqus.com)
  14. ^ blog comments powered by (disqus.com)

White House denies report that National Guard could be used to round up illegal immigrants

By Garance Burke, ABC11.com[1]

WASHINGTON

The White House distanced itself Friday from a Department of Homeland Security draft proposal to use the National Guard to round up unauthorized immigrants, but lawmakers said the document offers insight into the Trump administration s internal efforts to enact its promised crackdown on illegal immigration. Administration officials said the proposal, which called for mobilizing up to 100,000 troops in 11 states, was rejected, and would not be part of plans to carry out President Donald Trump s aggressive immigration policy. If implemented, the National Guard idea, contained in an 11-page memo obtained by The Associated Press, could have led to enforcement action against millions of immigrants living nowhere near the Mexican border. Four states that border on Mexico were included in the proposal California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas but it also encompassed seven states contiguous to those four Oregon, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana.

Despite the AP s public release of the document, White House spokesman Sean Spicer said there was no effort at all to utilize the National Guard to round up unauthorized immigrants. A DHS official described the document as a very early draft that was not seriously considered and never brought to Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly for approval. However, DHS staffers said Thursday that they had been told by colleagues in two DHS departments that the proposal was still being considered as recently as Feb. 10. DHS spokeswoman Gillian Christensen declined to say who wrote the memo, how long it had been under consideration or when it had been rejected. The pushback from administration officials did little to quell outrage over the draft plan. Three Republican governors spoke out against the proposal and numerous Democratic lawmakers denounced it as an overly aggressive approach to immigration enforcement.

Regardless of the White House s response, this document is an absolutely accurate description of the disturbing mindset that pervades the Trump administration when it comes to our nation s immigrants, said U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.)

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said he would have concerns about the utilization of National Guard resources for immigration enforcement, believing such a program would be too much of a strain on our National Guard personnel. Utah Gov. Gary Herbert would have serious concerns about the constitutional implications and financial impact of activating the National Guard to round up unauthorized immigrants, the governor s office said in a statement. Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval questioned the legality of the plan described in the draft memo and said it would be an inappropriate use of guard resources.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), said, This administration s complete disregard for the impact its internal chaos and inability to manage its own message and policy is having on real people s lives is offensive. The AP had sought comment from the White House beginning Thursday and DHS earlier Friday and had not received a response from either. After the AP released the story, Spicer said the memo was not a White House document and said there was no effort to do what is potentially suggested. Governors in the 11 states would have had a choice whether to have their guard troops participate, according to the memo, which bears the name of Kelly, a retired four-star Marine general.

At a maximum, approximately 100,000 Army National Guard and Air National Guard personnel would be available for stateside missions in the 11 states, according to statistics and information provided by the National Guard Bureau. While National Guard personnel have been used to assist with immigration-related missions on the U.S.-Mexico border before, they have never been used as broadly or as far north. The memo was addressed to the then-acting heads of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Customs and Border Protection. It would have served as guidance to implement the wide-ranging executive order on immigration and border security that President Donald Trump signed Jan. 25. Such memos are routinely issued to supplement executive orders.

Also dated Jan. 25, the draft memo says participating troops would be authorized to perform the functions of an immigration officer in relation to the investigation, apprehension and detention of aliens in the United States. It describes how the troops would be activated under a revived state-federal partnership program, and states that personnel would be authorized to conduct searches and identify and arrest any unauthorized immigrants.

If implemented, the impact could have been significant. Nearly one-half of the 11.1 million people residing in the U.S. without authorization live in the 11 states, according to Pew Research Center estimates based on 2014 Census data.

By Garance Burke, ABC11.com[2]

References

  1. ^ ABC11.com (abc11.com)
  2. ^ ABC11.com (abc11.com)
1 2 3 647