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Zags’ Collins & UNC’s Maye headline list of Final 4 X-factors

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) North Carolina s Luke Maye can t go to class without getting a standing ovation nor walk across campus without getting stopped by people requesting to take a photo with him. All because of one shot one that lifted the Tar Heels past Kentucky to reach the Final Four while turning the sophomore from rotation reserve to sudden star.

He s big-time now, junior Justin Jackson said. I feel like we need some security around campus.

Zags' Collins & UNC's Maye Headline List Of Final 4 X-factors
North Carolina forward Luke Maye (32) shoots the winning basket over Kentucky s Isaiah Briscoe (13) in the second half of the South Regional final game against Kentucky in the NCAA college basketball tournament Sunday, March 26, 2017, in Memphis, Tenn. The basket gave North Carolina a 75-73 win. (AP Photo/Brandon Dill)

Maye headlines a group of players that could emerge as X-factors in determining whether UNC, Gonzaga, Oregon or South Carolina wins the national championship. Don t sleep on Gonzaga s Zach Collins, Oregon s Jordan Bell or South Carolina s Rakym Felder.

The entire year, (coach Roy Williams) has been putting me in the games, wanting me to make good plays, Maye said Tuesday. Some games I hit a shot early, in other games I d just get a rebound or make a good pass. I m just trying to go out there and help my team win as best I can. The 6-foot-9 Maye entered last weekend as a player who has had some good moments including 15 rebounds against Florida State, 13 points at rival North Carolina State but generally played to spell starters Kennedy Meeks or Isaiah Hicks up front.

Yet he had shown a soft shooting touch and the ability to pull defending big men out to the perimeter. And when Hicks got in early foul trouble against Butler in the Sweet 16, Maye became much more than a sub for the Tar Heels (31-7). The guy who came in averaging 5.1 points in 13.8 minutes per game went for 16 points and 12 rebounds in the win against the Bulldogs. Then, with Hicks struggling against the Wildcats in the Elite Eight, Maye scored 17 points the last two coming on that jumper with 0.3 seconds left for the 75-73 win. Maye made 12 of 19 shots and 5 of 8 3-pointers 63 percent in both cases during the two-game stop in Memphis, Tennessee, to lift the South Region s No. 1 seed to a record 20th Final Four to face Oregon on Saturday.

When he sets a screen, most of the time (defenders) are hedging long, Jackson said. So whenever he pops, it s hard for them to find him. So that s huge. And then outside of that, because he s a stretch-4 there s much more room inside for the guards to drive. .. So when he s in there, I think that really helps us.

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Here s a look at players who could emerge from the shadows this weekend in Phoenix:

GONZAGA: The West Region s top seed has freshman Zach Collins, a 7-foot McDonald s All-American, coming off the bench behind center Przemek Karnowski. Collins is averaging 9.9 points and 5.7 rebounds while shooting 65.4 percent off the bench, and he s doing it in just 17.2 minutes per game entering the semifinals against South Carolina in a matchup of two first-time Final Four programs. OREGON: On a team led by Dillon Brooks and Tyler Dorsey, 6-9 junior Jordan Bell is averaging 10.9 points and 8.6 rebounds. But after the Ducks lost shot-blocker Chris Boucher to a knee injury during the Pac-12 Tournament, Bell proved his ability to dominate inside by finishing with 11 points, 13 rebounds and eight blocks in the Midwest Region final to help the Ducks beat No. 1 seed Kansas for their first Final Four since winning the 1939 NCAA title. SOUTH CAROLINA: Rakym Felder is the New York City point guard coach Frank Martin says he wanted. The 5-foot-10 freshman has started just once all year and plays 14.5 minutes per game, but has had some key production in the NCAA Tournament most notably by tallying 15 points, four rebounds and three assists in the upset of 2-seed Duke in the East Region s second round. Felder is shooting a team-best 43 percent from 3-point range while averaging 5.7 points entering the Gonzaga game.

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AP Sports Writers Pete Iacobelli in Columbia, South Carolina and Anne M. Peterson in Portland, Oregon, and Associated Press writer Nicholas K. Geranios in Spokane, Washington contributed to this report.

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Follow Aaron Beard on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/aaronbeardap[1]

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More AP college basketball: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25[2][3]

References

  1. ^ http://www.twitter.com/aaronbeardap (www.twitter.com)
  2. ^ http://collegebasketball.ap.org (collegebasketball.ap.org)
  3. ^ http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25 (www.twitter.com)

North Carolina’s Maye leads list of X-factors

By Aaron Beard The Associated Press

CHAPEL HILL, N.C. North Carolina’s Luke Maye can’t go to class without getting a standing ovation nor walk across campus without getting stopped by people requesting to take a photo with him. All because of one shot one that lifted the Tar Heels past Kentucky to reach the Final Four while turning the sophomore from rotation reserve to sudden star.

“He’s big-time now,” junior Justin Jackson said. “I feel like we need some security around campus.”

Maye headlines a group of players that could emerge as X-factors in determining whether UNC, Gonzaga, Oregon or South Carolina wins the national championship. Don’t sleep on Gonzaga’s Zach Collins, Oregon’s Jordan Bell or South Carolina’s Rakym Felder.

“The entire year, (coach Roy Williams) has been putting me in the games, wanting me to make good plays,” Maye said Tuesday. “Some games I hit a shot early, in other games I’d just get a rebound or make a good pass. I’m just trying to go out there and help my team win as best I can.”

The 6-foot-9 Maye entered last weekend as a player who has had some good moments including 15 rebounds against Florida State, 13 points at rival North Carolina State but generally played to spell starters Kennedy Meeks or Isaiah Hicks up front. Yet he had shown a soft shooting touch and the ability to pull defending big men out to the perimeter. And when Hicks got in early foul trouble against Butler in the Sweet 16, Maye became much more than a sub for the Tar Heels (31-7).

The guy who came in averaging 5.1 points in 13.8 minutes per game went for 16 points and 12 rebounds in the win against the Bulldogs. Then, with Hicks struggling against the Wildcats in the Elite Eight, Maye scored 17 points the last two coming on that jumper with 0.3 seconds left for the 75-73 win. Maye made 12 of 19 shots and 5 of 8 3-pointers 63 percent in both cases during the two-game stop in Memphis, Tennessee, to lift the South Region’s No. 1 seed to a record 20th Final Four to face Oregon on Saturday.

“When he sets a screen, most of the time (defenders) are hedging long,” Jackson said. “So whenever he pops, it’s hard for them to find him. So that’s huge. And then outside of that, because he’s a stretch-4 there’s much more room inside for the guards to drive. .. So when he’s in there, I think that really helps us.”

Here’s a look at players who could emerge from the shadows this weekend in Phoenix:

GONZAGA: The West Region’s top seed has freshman Zach Collins, a 7-foot McDonald’s All-American, coming off the bench behind center Przemek Karnowski. Collins is averaging 9.9 points and 5.7 rebounds while shooting 65.4 percent off the bench, and he’s doing it in just 17.2 minutes per game entering the semifinals against South Carolina in a matchup of two first-time Final Four programs. OREGON: On a team led by Dillon Brooks and Tyler Dorsey, 6-9 junior Jordan Bell is averaging 10.9 points and 8.6 rebounds. But after the Ducks lost shot-blocker Chris Boucher to a knee injury during the Pac-12 Tournament, Bell proved his ability to dominate inside by finishing with 11 points, 13 rebounds and eight blocks in the Midwest Region final to help the Ducks beat No. 1 seed Kansas for their first Final Four since winning the 1939 NCAA title.

SOUTH CAROLINA: Rakym Felder is the “New York City point guard” coach Frank Martin says he wanted. The 5-foot-10 freshman has started just once all year and plays 14.5 minutes per game, but has had some key production in the NCAA Tournament most notably by tallying 15 points, four rebounds and three assists in the upset of 2-seed Duke in the East Region’s second round. Felder is shooting a team-best 43 percent from 3-point range while averaging 5.7 points entering the Gonzaga game.

Man pulled from creek Monday near South Eugene High School facing murder charge; victim identified in court docs

The man pulled from Amazon Creek Monday afternoon has been booked into the Lane County Jail on a single charge of murder. Joshua Paul Jaschke, 37, was booked into the jail just after 12:30 a.m. Tuesday. A mugshot of Jaschke was not yet available. His address was listed on court records as the Oregon State Hospital in Salem.

Jaschke was arraigned at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday in the jail courtroom. No plea was entered. His next hearing is scheduled for April 4. Jaschke was arrested after Eugene police were called to East 19th Avenue and Pearl Street around 3:45 p.m. Monday for a report of an uncooperative and possibly injured man in Amazon Creek near South Eugene High School. Seconds later, a call came into the police dispatch center to report a fatal stabbing at a nearby apartment. Lane County Circuit Court charging documents name the victim as Spiros Steve Ghenatos, 50.

Luke Wheeler, a resident of the apartment complex, said that Jaschke did not live in the complex and allegedly stabbed the victim, then attempted a carjacking before attempting to break into Wheeler s apartment. Jaschke managed to wedge the top half of his body into Wheeler s apartment through a window before Wheeler chased him off, he said, adding that is when he saw Jaschke, reportedly with blood on his hands, jump into the creek and begin to take off his clothes. When Eugene police pulled Jaschke out of the creek, he was wearing only his underwear and boots. Jaschke was placed in the back of a police vehicle, then removed after repeatedly screamed invectives during the struggle regarding Donald Trump. It took six police officers to get Jaschke under control and further restrained, before he was taken away. Jaschke also shouted that a bomb was in his body.

Eugene police Lt. David Natt said Jaschke was further restrained for his safety and the safety of the officers. Jaschke was taken to a hospital, where he was chemically sedated, before he was booked into the jail, Natt said. Natt said Tuesday afternoon that detectives still are processing the scene, and that several articles of clothing removed from the creek are drying in the police department s evidence room. Natt would not confirm how the victim died.

Natt said that Jaschke and the victim both were inside the apartment of a third party when a dispute occurred. Someone reported the dispute to 911, but Natt said he did not know who called police. Natt could not confirm the carjacking and attempted burglary of Wheeler s apartment, but said that he did have information of those incidents secondhand. Natt said he did not know whether the victim was a resident of the apartment complex but confirmed the victim died in an apartment that was neither his nor Jaschke s. On Tuesday, Eugene police officials praised the patrol officers immediate response to the scene Monday as instrumental in the quick detention of a suspect during a chaotic scene.

Court records show that Jaschke, formerly of Creswell, was found guilty in 2006 of a Measure 11 first-degree assault charge by reason of insanity. He was sentenced to 20 years of supervision by the psychiatric security review board. There are four letters on file from the board in his court record the most recent from Jan. 10. Those letters are not open to the public. According to their website, the board was established in 1977 to supervise individuals who successfully asserted the insanity defense to a criminal charge. The board, with public safety as its primary focus, has an exceptional record of reintegrating clients into the community, their site states. In 2014, Jaschke was convicted of third-degree robbery and unlawful use of a weapon in Marion County. He was placed on a five-year probation and fined $340, court records show.

In 2011, Jaschke sued Oregon State Hospital and a host of doctors and staff from the Department of Human Services, alleging he was unnecessarily prescribed Adderall, which resulted in two heart attacks in 2009. In 2013, the lawsuit was dismissed. It was not immediately clear how or if the suit was settled. Follow Chelsea on Twitter @chelseagorrow[1]. Email articles

References

  1. ^ @chelseagorrow (twitter.com)
  2. ^