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Florida Man Pretends To Be Cop While Trying To Pull Over Actual Police Officer

Man Pretends To Be Cop, Tries To Pull Over An | The Daily Caller

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Florida Man Pretends To Be Cop While Trying To Pull Over Actual Police Officer

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Florida Man Pretends To Be Cop While Trying To Pull Over Actual Police Officer

Anders Hagstrom

3:24 PM 06/23/2017

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A Florida Man pretending to be a police officer was arrested Wednesday after he tried to pull over an actual Miami police officer by flashing his security guard badge. Milton Morales-Perez drove up alongside Officer Kenia Fallat of the Miami Police Department and said in Spanish, Police, stop the car, the Miami Herald reported Friday.[2]

Fallat, who was in uniform but driving an unmarked car at the time, responded by pulling him over and calling additional police for back up, who then arrested Morales-Perez. (RELATED: Florida Man Serves An 11-Year Sentence, Now The State Wants To Put Him Back In)[3]

The man reportedly told police he had the badge from working as a security guard in Hialeah, Fla., and had attempted to pull over Fallat because he saw she was on the phone.

It is very dangerous to be on the phone while driving, Morales-Perez said. He stands charged with one count of impersonating a police officer, which carries a sentence of up to five years in prison and up to a $5,000 fine.

Follow Anders on Twitter[4]

Tips: [email protected][5]

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected][6].

Florida Man Pretends To Be Cop While Trying To Pull Over Actual Police Officer

Florida Man Pretends To Be Cop While Trying To Pull Over Actual Police Officer

References

  1. ^ The Daily Caller (dailycaller.com)
  2. ^ reported Friday. (www.miamiherald.com)
  3. ^ (RELATED: Florida Man Serves An 11-Year Sentence, Now The State Wants To Put Him Back In) (dailycaller.com)
  4. ^ Follow Anders on Twitter (twitter.com)
  5. ^ [email protected] (dailycaller.com)
  6. ^ [email protected] (dailycaller.com)

Unless China changes tack, India won’t be the only country opposing One Belt, One Road

China s Belt and Road Forum, hosted with great fanfare, signals the priority of this flagship connectivity initiative while also underlining its credentials as the new shaper of global trends and norms. Exhorting all countries to participate, Chinese president Xi Jinping suggested that what we hope to create is a big family of harmonious co-existence. But India, an emerging economy that shares a contested border with China, worries about containment and new pathways for aggression from Pakistan. Other nations wonder if hegemonistic designs are hidden behind the rationality of connectivity and trade. The policy initiative aims to enhance China s centrality in the global economic unilateral approach. But how the project is conceived and implemented so far belies the rhetoric of multilateralism emanating from Beijing.

Taking inspiration from the ancient Silk Road trading route, China s One Belt One Road initiative, or OBOR, hopes to link more than 65 countries, encompassing up to 40% of global GDP. Xi s signature foreign paradigm linking China to Asia, Europe, and Africa via an ambitious network of ports, roads, rail, and other infrastructure projects. Beginning in China s Fujian province, the projected Maritime Silk Route passes through the Malacca Strait to the Indian Ocean, moving along the Red Sea and the Mediterranean, ending in Venice. The scale and scope of OBOR is huge, with at least $1 trillion in investments. At the Shanghai summit, Xi announced an additional $124 billion in funding for OBOR, including $8.7 billion in assistance to developing countries. China, desperate to deflect criticism that OBOR is primarily an instrument for Chinese expansionism, managed to convince heads of 29 states and governments to participate in the summit, including Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdo an, Italian prime minister Paolo Gentiloni, Russian president Vladimir Putin, and United Nations chief Antonio Guterres. Most western leaders sent representatives.

The West views this as a Chinese bilateral project.

The West views this as a Chinese bilateral project being touted as a multilateral venture. The outgoing president of the EU Chamber of Commerce in China[1] complains that the OBOR has been hijacked by Chinese companies, which have used it as an excuse to evade capital controls, smuggling money out of the country by disguising it as international investments and partnerships. The rest of the world is more receptive. Lavishing praise on China for the OBOR initiative, while targeting the US, Putin[2] warned at the summit that protectionism is becoming the new normal, adding that the ideas of openness and free trade are increasingly often being rejected (even) by those who until very recently expounded them.

South Asia also welcomes OBOR, and most of India s neighbours attended. India refused to participate, maintaining opposition to China s investment in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, or CPEC, which passes through Pakistan-occupied Kashmir. India, announced in an official statement[3]: No country can accept a project that ignores its core concerns on sovereignty and territorial integrity. Indian foreign secretary S Jaishankar articulated this position at the 2017 Raisina Dialogue: China is very sensitive about its sovereignty. The economic corridor passes through an illegal territory, an area that we call Pak-occupied Kashmir. You can imagine India s reaction at the fact that such a project has been initiated without consulting us. Prime minister Narendra Modi reinforced this point, asserting that connectivity in itself cannot override or undermine the sovereignty of other nations. The advantages for India of joining China s multi-billion dollar OBOR initiative are apparent, and the economic logic is compelling. With bilateral trade of $70.08 billion in 2016, China remains India s largest trading partner. Last year also saw record Chinese investments into India, reaching close to $1 billion. Compared to this, China s economic ties with Pakistan remain underwhelming, with bilateral trade volume reaching $13.77 billion last year. Yet, against the backdrop of deteriorating Sino-Indian ties, India cannot feasibly join the OBOR project without challenging the very foundations of its foreign policy. The $55-billion CPEC would link China s Muslim-dominated Xinjiang Province to the Gwadar deep-sea port in Pakistan. Despite the rhetoric, Beijing s priority in pumping huge sums into a highly volatile Pakistani territory is not to provide economic relief for Pakistan s struggling economy or to promote regional economic cooperation.

The development may not subdue restive Muslims in either country. The challenges are huge as underscored by the related militarisation. Pakistan has deployed more than 15,000 troops to protect the CPEC, and is raising a naval contingent for protection of the Gwadar; China will also station part of its growing naval forces at Gwadar. Concerns are already being expressed that Pakistan could become a Chinese colony once the corridor is operationalised. For the Chinese, security in the province of Balochistan is the biggest concern. Economic conditions in Balochistan remain dire with over two-thirds of its inhabitants living in poverty, and local opposition to the project is mounting by the day. Baloch separatists, especially those from the Baloch Liberation Army, are reported to have abducted and killed foreigners, particularly the Chinese. Such turmoil could have regional consequences. The long-term strategic consequences of OBOR for India could also allow China to consolidate its presence in the Indian Ocean at India s expense. Indian critics contend that China may use its economic power to increase its geopolitical leverage and, in doing so, intensify security concerns for India. CPEC gives China a foothold in the western Indian Ocean with the Gwadar port, located near the strategic Strait of Hormuz, where Chinese warships and a submarine have surfaced. Access here allows China greater potential to control maritime trade in that part of the world a vulnerable point for India, which sources more than 60% of its oil supplies from the Middle East. What s more, if CPEC does resolve China s Malacca dilemma its over-reliance on the Malacca Straits for the transport of its energy resources this gives Asia s largest economy greater operational space to pursue unilateral interests in maritime matters to the detriment of the freedom of navigation and trade-energy security of several states in the Indian Ocean region, including India.

The Maritime Silk Road reinforces New Delhi s concerns about encirclement.

More generally, the Maritime Silk Road reinforces New Delhi s concerns about encirclement. Beijing s port development projects in the Indian Ocean open the possibility of dual-use facilities, complicating India s security calculus. India has its own set of connectivity initiatives such as Myanmar s Kaladan project, the Chabahar port project with Iran, as well as the north-south corridor with Russia, which could be potentially leveraged. The proposed 7,200-kilometre International North South Transportation Corridor is a ship, rail, and road transportation system connecting the Indian Ocean and Persian Gulf to the Caspian Sea via Iran to Russia and north Europe. The Indian and Japanese governments are working on a vision document for developing an Asia-Africa Growth Corridor, largely meant to propel growth and investment in Africa, in part a response to China s ever-growing presence on the continent.

The Belt and Road Initiative is a highly ambitious undertaking in line with China s aspirations to emerge as the central economic power at a time when the United States makes plans to step back from global affairs. Its success depends on China s ability to move beyond the bilateral framework and allow a truly multilateral vision for the project to evolve. Otherwise, China can expect to contend with opposition from more countries than India.

This post originally appeared on YaleGlobal Online.[4] We welcome your comments at

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Unless China Changes Tack, India Won't Be The Only Country Opposing One Belt, One Road

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References

  1. ^ The outgoing president of the EU Chamber of Commerce in China (www.cnn.com)
  2. ^ Putin (www.cnn.com)
  3. ^ official statement (www.dnaindia.com)
  4. ^ YaleGlobal Online. (yaleglobal.yale.edu)
  5. ^

Saving Lives in the Stacks

Saving Lives In The Stacks

On June 1, the Philadelphia Inquirer[1] broke the news that the Free Library of Philadelphia s McPherson Square Branch had a serious problem with opioid use among patrons. By June 3, everybody from the Washington Post[2] to National Public Radio[3] (NPR) had picked up the story.

As this nation s opioid crisis has exploded, the staff at the public library have become first responders, NPR s Scott Simon told listeners. And I gather the librarians there have been obliged to become involved in a way that well, become involved in a way librarians aren t usually asked to become involved. What Simon didn t say but what librarians far and wide know is that the McPherson Square branch is just one of many American libraries struggling with opioid-related issues such as discarded, contaminated needles; drug use in the library itself; and even on-site overdoses and fatalities. Libraries from California to Colorado, Pennsylvania to Missouri, are finding themselves on the front lines of a battle they never anticipated fighting. Of course, opiate use isn t limited to libraries. Neither is anyone claiming that the problem is more severe in libraries than it is anywhere else. Still, the fact that libraries are open to all, offer relative anonymity, and generally allow patrons to stay as long as they like make them uniquely vulnerable to those seeking a place to use drugs.

It s just like: What is going on? How can we stem this tide? says Kim Fender, director of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County (PLCH).

A life at stake

In 2015, more Americans died from drug overdose than from car accidents and gun homicides combined[4], and more than six out of 10[5] of those overdoses involved an opioid. Preliminary data for 2016 suggests that drug overdose deaths for that year rose by about 19%[6] the largest annual increase the United States has ever seen. Among the opioids used illegally are heroin; prescription pain medications such as oxycodone; fentanyl, a synthetic opioid 50-100 times more potent than morphine; and carfentanil, an elephant tranquilizer 10,000 times stronger than morphine. Kitty Yancheff doesn t know exactly which opiate caused the overdose of the patron she encountered in the Humboldt County (Calif.) Library in Eureka last year. She just knows that without her intervention, he would almost certainly have died.

After noticing a man at a table near the reference desk who seemed to be sleeping, Yancheff, the library s public service division manager, tried to rouse him, first with words and then by banging on the table and his chair. As I m doing this, I noticed that he was sweating profusely, really dripping, she tells AL. He had mucus coming out of his nose, and his breathing was kind of gurgly, and his lips were blue, so I figured he was having an overdose. (The World Health Organization states that an opiate overdose can be identified by three symptoms: pinpoint pupils, unconsciousness, and respiratory depression.)

As another staff member called 911, Yancheff grabbed a dose of Narcan, a drug that reverses the effects of opiate overdose, and administered it to the man via injection in his thigh, through his clothing. (The local public health department had recently given the library a supply of Narcan and trained staff in its use.) When he didn t respond, she followed protocol by giving him a second dose, at which point his eyelids began to flutter. A few minutes later, the paramedics arrived. The man survived, though Yancheff hasn t seen him since.

It was surreal, Yancheff says. But I think to not have the Narcan, and sit idly by and watch someone die, would have been even worse.

To stock Narcan, or not

It s not clear how many libraries have joined Humboldt County Library in making Narcan available and training staff in its use. Among those who have is Denver Public Library s Central branch, which began stocking Narcan earlier this year after a homeless patron overdosed and died in the library s bathroom from a combination of heroin, methamphetamine, and other drugs. The library bought 12 Narcan kits in February. By May, it had used seven of them.

We have 13 staff members who are trained to use it our two social workers and then 11 security staff, explains Rachel Fewell, central library administrator. The library stocks a nasal-spray form of Narcan, rather than the injectable version. It s noninvasive, and there s a clear protocol around it. It costs us $75 per kit. If you can save somebody s life for $75, let s do it. But what if Narcan is mistakenly administered to someone who hasn t actually overdosed? It s not going to have any negative impact, Fewell explains. All it does is block opioids from hitting receptors in the brain, so even if you incorrectly use it on someone, there s no negative side to it. In addition, Narcan itself is not addictive, so libraries need not worry about any potential for abuse.

To the argument that administering Narcan falls outside the library s mission, Fewell responds: This is definitely scope creep for us, but we re the de facto day shelter for Denver. If that s how the city is going to see us, I d rather my staff has tools to deal with it. Yancheff agrees. Not stocking Narcan does not mean that that s going to keep folks [who use opioids] away, she points out. Some people are concerned that if you stock it, they re going to know they can come in there and overdose and know you ll be able to revive them. Personally, I don t believe that s the case. I just see it as a resource similar to CPR, just another thing in our first-aid resource kit. While other libraries consider whether to follow Denver s and Humboldt County s example regarding Narcan, some are resorting to other strategies, many of which center on library restrooms.

Needle Safety in the Library

By Roger A. Donaldson II

Whether discarded needles are found inside or outside the library facility, staff must be aware of their dangers and dispose of them safely. Conduct walkarounds in your facility at least once per day to look for discarded needles, and do not put your hands in trash cans or other areas in which you can t see what you re touching. If your facility crushes trash to conserve trash bags, use an object to do so, rather than your hands. Consider providing a sharps container in the restrooms for proper disposal of needles. Some sources recommend using tongs or other grabbing devices to pick up a discarded needle, but this may cause the needle to flick or fall, injuring yourself or others.

If you find a discarded needle:

  • Make sure to keep other people especially children away.
  • Don thin, disposable latex gloves.
  • Bring a container to the needle (rather than the other way around). The container should be sealable, with rigid, puncture-proof walls. These containers can be purchased through Amazon and other retailers; you can also consult your county health department. Do not use glass bottles for this purpose, as they can break.
  • Put the container on a stable surface, rather than holding it in your hand.
  • Make sure that you can clearly see the needle and your hands.
  • If you see more than one needle together, use a stick or similar object to separate them, and handle only one at a time.
  • Pick up the needle from the blunt end, avoiding the sharp point. Do not attempt to re-cap it.
  • Place the needle in the container and seal it.
  • Discard the gloves and wash your hands immediately.

Sharps containers should be discarded according to your local regulations. Some cities require the sharps containers to be placed with regular trash pickup in a visible manner, so that garbage collectors can handle the container safely. Other cities require sharps containers to be dropped off at the county health department or another designated point. Call your local health department or law enforcement department for information on proper disposal. If a needle-stick injury occurs, stay calm, and wash the area with soap and water as soon as possible. Apply antiseptic and a bandage, contact your supervisor, and promptly seek medical treatment.


ROGER A. DONALDSON II, CPLS, is IT administrator and technical services supervisor at Jackson (Ohio) City Library.

Keeping restrooms safe for all

It is unavoidable that people are going to use drugs in public bathrooms, says Dr. Alex Walley, director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship Program at Boston Medical Center and associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. The sooner that libraries accept that and try to prepare for it, the better off they re going to be. Philadelphia s McPherson branch has certainly accepted it. In May, after the branch experienced several overdoses, it began requiring patrons who wanted to use the bathroom to show identification.

That proved to be too much for the circulation desk to keep track of, says Judi Moore, the branch s library supervisor and children s librarian. So the library partnered with a local nonprofit, which now supplies volunteer bathroom monitors who sit by the bathroom door, take identification, and time people. If a person hasn t emerged from the bathroom after five minutes, a security guard knocks on the door. Since the new rules have been implemented, no overdoses have occurred in the branch s bathrooms.

The main branch of PLCH has experienced an astonishing number of overdoses in the past year about 50, or slightly fewer than one a week. As Fender points out, that s a relatively small number compared with the million-plus visits the branch gets each year, but it s still obviously a behavior we don t want in any way to continue. Because the branch is located extremely close to a fire station, which is the first to respond to 911 calls of any nature, the library has chosen not to stock Narcan, Fender says: They can get here very, very quickly. Instead, the library has taken measures such as having its 20-member security staff patrol bathrooms more often. Just having people walking in certainly helps deter any kinds of behaviors someone might do in a bathroom that you wouldn t want, she says. We had originally proposed closing off some of the restrooms, but building code requires a certain number of male and female toilets because of our occupancy. If the tide of overdoses doesn t ebb, she adds, the library will likely consider turning to Narcan. What other strategies can libraries consider to discourage drug use in restrooms? In the past, some institutions have installed blue lights in bathrooms, with the idea that doing so makes it more difficult for users of intravenous drugs to find a vein to inject. Per Walley, the physician at Boston Medical, this strategy is unwise. The worst-case scenario is that someone tries to use despite that lighting and hits an artery, so then there s pulsing blood in the bathroom, he says.

Instead, he recommends increasing bathroom monitoring, particularly for single-user bathrooms. One strategy is to keep the bathroom locked so that patrons have to ask for the key at the front desk. If the key hasn t come back after a short period of time, a security guard or other worker can be dispatched to check the bathroom. Another is to install an intercom and require bathroom users to respond through it when checked on. Steve Albrecht, a trainer and security consultant who has taught library security workshops for nearly 20 years, and who is the author of Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities[7] (ALA Editions, 2015), has another suggestion: I like camera systems. He s not talking about video cameras in the bathroom itself, of course, but rather just outside it, along with signs noting that the area is under video surveillance. Banks still get robbed even though they have cameras, but it s a good deterrent, he says. Walley also recommends installing secure needle-disposal boxes in the bathroom. Otherwise, he says people will put their needles down the toilet. Indeed, Philadelphia s McPherson branch was forced to close for a few days earlier this year after its bathroom pipes were clogged with needles. The branch has since installed sharps containers.

And if the bathroom is especially small, the library should make sure that its door opens outward rather than inward. There have been cases where people have overdosed and fallen against the door and blocked the door so it can t be opened, Walley says. I imagine most libraries are ADA-compliant, so you wouldn t have that situation, but if you do, that s relatively easy to fix.

Hope on the horizon?

When and whether the opioid crisis will end is anything but clear. Preliminary data for 2017 indicates that the tide of drug deaths has yet to turn. Still, there are some signs of hope. The Federal Drug Administration recently asked[8] drug company Endo Pharmaceuticals to take the powerful medication Opana ER off the market, a move interpreted by some[9] as a sign that the agency is ramping up its efforts against the abuse of prescription opioids. And some states, including New York[10] and Maryland[11], have passed legislation aimed at combating the crisis, such as by making Narcan more widely available, requiring physicians who prescribe opioids to prescribe the lowest effective dose, or allowing prosecutors to seek longer prison sentences for drug dealers who knowingly sell fentanyl.

But until the opioid war has been won, libraries will surely continue to find themselves on its front lines. As Fender says: We re all struggling together.


Facts About Narcan

  • Narcan is the brand name of a drug called naloxone, a medication that reverses the effects of opioid overdose by preventing the opioid from reaching the brain.
  • If Narcan is given to someone who is not experiencing overdose, nothing will happen; there is no potential for harm. In addition, it is not possible to overdose on Narcan.
  • Narcan is available both as an injection and as a nasal spray. It works within two to eight minutes.
  • Libraries that stock Narcan typically administer it in conjunction with a call to professional emergency services (911).
  • For more information on Narcan, visit naloxoneinfo.org[12] or getnaloxonenow.org[13].

References

  1. ^ Philadelphia Inquirer (www.philly.com)
  2. ^ Washington Post (www.washingtonpost.com)
  3. ^ National Public Radio (www.npr.org)
  4. ^ from car accidents and gun homicides combined (www.nytimes.com)
  5. ^ more than six out of 10 (www.cdc.gov)
  6. ^ about 19% (www.nytimes.com)
  7. ^ Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities (www.alastore.ala.org)
  8. ^ recently asked (www.fda.gov)
  9. ^ interpreted by some (www.bloomberg.com)
  10. ^ New York (www.governor.ny.gov)
  11. ^ Maryland (governor.maryland.gov)
  12. ^ naloxoneinfo.org (naloxoneinfo.org)
  13. ^ getnaloxonenow.org (www.getnaloxonenow.org)
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