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Britain says suicide bomber likely had accomplices

MANCHESTER, England Britain’s top domestic security official said Wednesday it was “likely” that the bomber who killed 22 people[1] at a concert on Monday night was not acting alone, a day after the nation’s threat level was raised and the military deployed to guard public events. In an interview with the BBC, Home Secretary Amber Rudd did not provide details of who suspect Salman Abedi may have been working with when he detonated explosives in an attack that targeted teenage concertgoers, but she said security services which had been aware of Abedi “up to a point” before the bombing are focusing on his visits to Libya, at least one of which was very recent. Her French counterpart, Interior Minister Gerard Collomb, told broadcaster BFMTV that Abedi may have also gone to Syria, and had “proven” links with Islamic State.

British Prime Minister Theresa May’s Tuesday night announcement, which takes Britain’s alert level from “severe” to its highest rating, “critical,” clears the way for thousands of British troops to take to the streets and replace police officers in guarding key sites. May announced the move after chairing an emergency meeting of her security Cabinet and concluding that Abedi may have been part of a wider network that is poised to strike again. The decision, she said, was “a proportionate and sensible response to the threat that our security experts judge we face.”

The worst terrorist attack on British soil in over a decade was carried out by a British-born son of Libyan immigrants who was born and raised a short drive from the concert hall that he transformed from a scene of youthful celebration into a tableau of horror. Health officials said Wednesday that in addition to the dead, 20 people remained in “critical care” and were suffering from “horrific injuries.”

Britain Says Suicide Bomber Likely Had Accomplices

A Muslim man and a Jewish woman walk by floral tributes in St Ann s Square in Manchester, Britain May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Staples

Even as officials and experts cast doubt on the terrorist group’s assertion, however, authorities were scrambling to execute searches, arrest potential accomplices and reinforce security systems at a spectrum of public events that look newly vulnerable to attacks like Monday’s.

After years of successfully fending off more-sophisticated strikes even as countries across continental Europe have fallen victim to bombings, Monday night’s carnage underscored that Britain is not immune amid a rising tide of extremist violence. The highest priority for police, said Greater Manchester Chief Constable Ian Hopkins, was to “establish whether [Abedi] was acting alone or as part of a network.”

Earlier he had said that Abedi executed the bombing alone and that he “was carrying an improvised explosive device, which he detonated, causing this atrocity.”

But unlike in previous high-profile attacks including one in March in which an assailant driving a speeding car ran down pedestrians on a London bridge, then stabbed to death a British police officer experts said it was unlikely that Monday’s attack had been carried out without help.

“Getting a car or a knife is easy,” said Raffaello Pantucci, a terrorism expert at the London-based Royal United Services Institute. “Making a bomb that works and goes off when you want it to go off takes preparation and practice. And it usually involves other people.”

Pantucci said British authorities “are going to try to figure out who [Abedi] knows, who he’s linked to. Did he build the bomb itself, or did someone build it and give it to him?”

If police have an answer, they did not say so publicly Tuesday. But there was ample evidence of a widening security operation, with the arrest of a 23-year-old from south Manchester in connection with the bombing. Police also carried out searches at two homes, including the house in the leafy suburban neighborhood where Abedi, 22, was registered as having lived.

Britain Says Suicide Bomber Likely Had Accomplices

Forensics investigators work outside the Manchester Arena, May 24, 2017. REUTERS/Jon Super

A family friend said Abedi traveled frequently between Libya and Britain. “We have an Daesh problem in Libya. We wonder whether he met people there who trained him,” said the friend, who spoke on the condition of anonymity. Daesh is the Arabic acronym for the Islamic State. Even before May’s announcement of a “critical” threat level for just the third time ever the first two came in 2006 and 2007 authorities from London to Scotland said that they would be reviewing security plans for upcoming public events. Even smaller gatherings that would not have been policed in the past may now get protection, they said.

“Over the coming days as you go to a music venue, go shopping, travel to work or head off to the fantastic sporting events, you will see more officers, including armed officers,” said Commander Jane Connors of London’s Metropolitan Police Department.

May’s decision to deploy the military means the public may now see soldiers rather than police. May said the military would operate under police command. The escalation came as the nation grieved for the young victims, with thousands of people converging on Manchester’s graceful Albert Square for a vigil that was part solemn remembrance and part rally against extremism. To roaring applause, Manchester Mayor Andy Burnham vowed that the city which has seen hardship, having been bombed relentlessly during World War II would not succumb to division or anger. A poet named Tony Walsh delivered an ode to the city titled “This Is the Place.” And in what has become a dark mainstay of life in Western Europe, passersby left candles, flowers and cards for the dead.

The casualties included children as young as elementary school students. Police said that among the 59 people injured, a dozen were younger than 16. Among the dead was Saffie Rose Roussos, who was just 8 years-old. The first victim to be publicly identified was Georgina Callander, an 18-year-old student. Other names were expected to be released Wednesday, with authorities bracing the public for deaths among the teens and tweens who form the core of Grande’s enthusiastic fan base.

The Islamic State did not give any details about the attacker or how the blast was carried out, raising doubts about the truth of its claim. Its statement was posted on the online messaging service Telegram and later noted by the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors militant websites. The Islamic State often quickly proclaims links to attacks, but some previous boasts have not been proved. In Washington, Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats said Tuesday that despite the group’s statement, “we have not verified yet the connection.” He noted in a Senate hearing that “they claim responsibility for virtually every attack.”

In a speech outside 10 Downing Street, where flags were lowered to half-staff, May called the Manchester killings a “callous terrorist attack.”

“This attack stands out for its appalling, sickening cowardice deliberately targeting innocent, defenseless children and young people who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives,” she said.

May later visited Manchester, meeting with local authorities and signing a condolence book honoring the victims. Queen Elizabeth II, meanwhile, led guests of a garden party at Buckingham Palace in a moment of silence and issued a statement expressing her “deepest sympathies.”

“The whole nation has been shocked by the death and injury in Manchester last night of so many people, adults and children, who had just been enjoying a concert,” she said. Across the world, other leaders expressed revulsion and scorn toward the bomber.

During a visit to the West Bank city of Bethlehem, President Trump pledged “absolute solidarity” with Britain and called those responsible for the attack “evil losers in life.”

Organizers of the Cannes Film Festival denounced the bombing as an “attack on culture, youth and joyfulness” and observed a minute of silence Tuesday. Cannes is 15 miles from Nice, where an attacker driving a truck plowed into crowds celebrating Bastille Day in July, killing 86 people. The Monday night attack was the worst terrorist strike on British soil since 2005, when Islamist extremists bombed the London subway and a bus, killing 54 people. And as with that attack, Monday’s bombing prompted desperate searches for missing loved ones that continued through the night and into Tuesday.

Charlotte Campbell told the BBC that she was “phoning everybody,” including hospitals, trying to locate her 15-year-old daughter, Olivia. She last spoke to her daughter Monday night while she was at the concert.

“She’d just seen the support act and said she was having an amazing time, and thanking me for letting her go,” Campbell said in an emotional interview. On Wednesday, Campbell confirmed on social media that her daughter had been killed. The attack occurred near one of the exits of the arena, in a public space connected to a bustling train station.

Jake Taylor, a former security guard at the arena, said its layout makes absolute safety impossible.

“You can’t stop people from getting through the train station,” Taylor said. Mark Harrison, who accompanied his 12-year-old daughter to the concert from Cumbria in northern England, said there were no metal detectors or body checks at the arena’s entrance, although bags were inspected and items such as water bottles had to be discarded.

“There was definitely a security presence, but anyone can come through the train station,” said Harrison, 44. Pantucci, the security expert, said that authorities had disrupted several plots in recent months but that Monday’s attack somehow slipped through. Understanding why, he said, will be crucial.

“They’ve been dealing with a very high threat tempo,” he said. “But this is one they weren’t able to stop.”

Adam reported from London. Isaac Stanley-Becker, James McAuley and Rick Noack in Manchester; Paul Schemm in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; and Devlin Barrett, Brian Murphy and Ellen Nakashima in Washington contributed to this report.

References

  1. ^ who killed 22 people (www.adn.com)

UK bombing suspect ID’d; ISIS claims responsibility

MANCHESTER, England The Islamic State claimed Tuesday that one of its “soldiers” carried out an apparent suicide bombing in Manchester that killed at least 22 people, including teenagers and others streaming out of a pop concert. Greater Manchester Police Chief Constable Ian Hopkins named the suspected attacker as 22-year-old Salman Abedi but declined to provide other details. A senior European intelligence official said the attacker was a British citizen of Libyan descent. The official said the suspect’s brother has been taken into custody.

The Islamic State’s claim came as British investigators intensified their search for possible accomplices and police teams fanned out across the northern city after the worst terrorist strike in Britain in more than a decade. The Islamic State did not give any details about the attacker or how the blast was carried out late Monday. Its statement was posted on the online messaging service Telegram and later noted by the SITE Intelligence Group, which monitors militant websites. The Islamic State often quickly proclaims links to attacks, but some previous claims have not been proven.

UK Bombing Suspect ID'd; ISIS Claims Responsibility

Police stand outside a residential property near where a man was arrested in the Chorlton area of Manchester, May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Stefan Wermuth

British Prime Minister Theresa May called the carnage a “callous terrorist attack.”

“This attack stands out for its appalling, sickening cowardice deliberately targeting innocent, defenseless children and young people who should have been enjoying one of the most memorable nights of their lives,” she said, speaking outside her Downing Street offices, where flags were lowered to half-staff. May later visited Manchester, meeting with local authorities and signing a condolence book honoring the victims. Queen Elizabeth II, meanwhile, expressed her “deepest sympathies.”

“The whole nation has been shocked by the death and injury in Manchester last night of so many people, adults and children, who had just been enjoying a concert,” she said in a statement released by Buckingham Palace.

Condemnations also poured in from other leaders around the world.

UK Bombing Suspect ID'd; ISIS Claims Responsibility

A youngster wearing a T-shirt showing U.S. singer Ariana Grande talks to the media near the Manchester Arena, May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Yates

In Washington, Director of National Intelligence Daniel Coats said Tuesday that despite the Islamic State’s claim of responsibility for the Manchester attack, “we have not verified yet the connection.” He noted in a Senate hearing that “they claim responsibility for virtually every attack.”

The casualties included children as young as elementary school students. Police said that among the 59 people injured, a dozen were younger than 16. Among those killed, Georgina Callander, an 18-year-old student, was the first victim to be named. British media also reported that an 8-year-old girl, Saffie Rose Roussos, could have been the youngest fatality.

“We believe at this stage the attack last night was conducted by one man,” Hopkins said at a televised news conference. “We believe the attacker was carrying an improvised explosive device, which he detonated, causing this atrocity.”

In a later appearance, Hopkins said the priority for police was to “establish whether [the assailant] was acting alone or as part of a network.”

During a visit to the West Bank city of Bethlehem, President Donald Trump pledged “absolute solidarity” with Britain and called those responsible for the attack “evil losers in life.”

UK Bombing Suspect ID'd; ISIS Claims Responsibility

A police cordon outside Manchester Arena, where U.S. singer Ariana Grande had been performing, May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Yates

The bombing appeared intended to inflict maximum bloodshed on the young concertgoers many in their early teens who were making their way out of the Manchester Arena, one of Europe’s largest indoor venues, with a seating capacity of 21,000. The blast occurred about 10:30 p.m. Monday, minutes after pop star Ariana Grande had finished her set and many fans were gathered in the foyer to buy concert merchandise.

The explosion set off a panic as fans struggled to flee and parents and teens searched for one another amid the carnage. Parents who had lost contact with their children posted desperate pleas for information on social media using the hashtag #ManchesterMissing. Charlotte Campbell told the BBC that she was “phoning everybody,” including hospitals, trying to locate her 15-year-old daughter, Olivia. She last spoke to her daughter on Monday night at the concert.

“She’d just seen the support act and said she was having an amazing time, and thanking me for letting her go,” Campbell said in an emotional interview. The attack occurred near one of the exits of the arena, in a public space connected to a bustling train station.

Jake Taylor, a former security guard at the arena, said its layout makes absolute safety impossible.

“You can’t stop people from getting through the train station,” Taylor said.

UK Bombing Suspect ID'd; ISIS Claims Responsibility

Forensics investigators work at the entrance of the Manchester Arena, May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Yates

Mark Harrison, who accompanied his 12-year-old daughter to the concert from Cumbria in northern England, said there were no metal detectors or body checks at the arena’s entrance, though bags were inspected and items such as water bottles had to be discarded.

“There was definitely a security presence, but anyone can come through the train station,” Harrison, 44, said. Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, called it an “evil act” but praised the “spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.”

Manchester is “grieving today, but we are strong,” he said. On Tuesday evening, a large crowd gathered in Manchester’s Albert Square for a solemn vigil honoring the victims.

The Monday night attack was the worst terrorist strike on British soil since 2005, when Islamist extremists bombed the London subway and a bus, killing 54 people. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security said late Monday that there was “no information to indicate a specific credible threat involving music venues in the United States” but added that Americans may see “increased security in and around public places and events as officials take additional precautions.”

In France, the scene of several terrorist attacks over the past year, Prime Minister Edouard Philippe called on people to be vigilant in the face of “a threat which is more present than ever before.”

Organizers of the Cannes Film Festival denounced the Manchester bombing as an “attack on culture, youth and joyfulness” and observed a minute of silence Tuesday. Cannes is 15 miles from Nice, where an attacker driving a truck plowed into crowds celebrating Bastille Day in July, killing 86 people.

UK Bombing Suspect ID'd; ISIS Claims Responsibility

A woman lays flowers for the victims of the Manchester Arena attack, in central Manchester, May 23, 2017. REUTERS/Darren Staples

Britain has been on high alert for a major attack for several years, with authorities saying that a mass-casualty attack was likely. Grande, who is wildly popular both in Britain and the United States, was not injured in the attack. She expressed her sorrow in a tweet hours after the explosion, saying she was “broken. from the bottom of my heart, i am so sorry. i don’t have words.”

A father told the BBC that he was leaving the arena with his wife and daughter when the blast blew him through a set of doors. Afterward, the man, identified as Andy, said he saw about 30 people “scattered everywhere. Some of them looked dead.”

Separated from his wife and daughter, he said, he “looked at some of the bodies trying to find my family.”

He later found them, uninjured.

Karen Ford, a witness, told the BBC that “there were kids outside, crying on the phone, trying to find their parents.”

The scenes of bloodied, panicked concertgoers running for safety brought to mind similar images at the Bataclan theater in Paris in November 2015. The concert hall became the scene of carnage after gunmen burst in during a show by the American rock band Eagles of Death Metal and began shooting. That attack for which the Islamic State later asserted responsibility killed 89 people and injured hundreds, becoming the deadliest event on French soil since World War II. In all, 130 people were killed that night in coordinated attacks. Monday night’s blast came two months after a speeding driver left four people dead on London’s Westminster Bridge, then stabbed to death a police officer at the gates of Parliament.

Monday also was the fourth anniversary of the killing of Lee Rigby, a British soldier who was attacked with a machete on the streets of southeast London. Two assailants, who were later convicted of murder, said they were acting to avenge the killing of Muslims by British soldiers.

In just over two weeks, Britain is scheduled to hold a national election. Campaigning was suspended Tuesday, and perhaps beyond. Security has not featured as a prominent part of the debate, although that may change when campaigning resumes.

The tourist’s guide to navigating Alaska’s legal marijuana market

Alaska Marijuana News[1]

Marijuana is stocked on the shelves of Herbal Outfitters in Valdez on Oct. 29, 2016. (Marc Lester / Alaska Dispatch News)

Summer is here, and that means tourists are descending on the state in search of mountain viewing, whale sightings and, sometimes, marijuana. This summer marks the state’s first tourist season with marijuana shops up and running. For travelers heading to Alaska, here’s what to expect, do and avoid.

What you can do

Anyone 21 years or older can buy and carry up to an ounce of marijuana. You can give and receive up to an ounce for free.

But the state still has some places where marijuana is not allowed like national parks and some private property.

The lowdown on retail shops

Marijuana stores have opened in many Alaska communities, from Fairbanks to Sitka. Bring your ID, because Alaska law requires businesses to check it. Each shop is a little different, but marijuana will be behind the counter and a budtender will help you pick out what you want. You can smell and look at the product but not touch it.

Most shops have their current menus online prices for grams tend to hover around $20. It’s cash only. Some stores have ATMs. Budtenders like tips. The state doesn’t track customer information, but some shops are asking for names and other information for their in-house point of sale system. The Tourist's Guide To Navigating Alaska's Legal Marijuana Market

Michael Holcomb smells a jar of marijuana held by Herbal Outfitters general manager Derek Morris in Valdez on .Oct. 29, 2016. (Marc Lester / Alaska Dispatch News)

Marijuana and driving

No state laws say you have to transport marijuana in a certain way in your vehicle. In Anchorage, you are supposed to carry marijuana in the trunk of your car. If your car has no trunk (like a hatchback), it needs to be behind the last row of seats. It’s supposed to be in a sealed container that hasn’t been opened, under Anchorage law.

If you get stoned and drive, you could get a DUI. Law enforcement goes by standard field sobriety tests to decide whether a person is considered impaired, both the Alaska State Troopers and Anchorage Police Department said.

Traveling by plane

Under federal law, pilots who knowingly carry marijuana on a flight risk losing their certification. Alaska Airlines is clear that marijuana is not allowed on board, in carry-on or checked luggage. A number of smaller airlines have a similar policy. But for months, airport police have been letting small amounts of marijuana through security checkpoints in Anchorage and Fairbanks. (Transportation Security Administration employees call police, who then allow travelers to continue through the checkpoint with cannabis.)

The Juneau Police Department is taking a hands-off approach, leaving it up to the discretion of TSA. They won’t confiscate your marijuana, JPD Lt. David Campbell said, but TSA may require you to leave it behind. So if you fly with marijuana, local police may not stop you but you’re still taking a risk. The Tourist's Guide To Navigating Alaska's Legal Marijuana Market

The Coral Princess cruise ship in Skagway Aug. 23, 2015 (Anne Raup / Alaska Dispatch News)

Alaska ferry system and cruise ships

The U.S. Coast Guard is the law enforcement entity on federal waterways, including those traversed by Alaska’s ferries and cruise lines.

“It’s illegal federally and we try to inform the public of that,” said Brian Dykens, a spokesman for the Coast Guard in Alaska. “I can’t tell you what we would do or not do if we come across drugs.”

But the Alaska Marine Highway System, including popular Southeast ferry routes, isn’t actively seeking out people who are carrying marijuana, according to Shannon McCarthy, spokesperson for the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities. Usually, if crew members discover someone with less than an ounce of marijuana, the person is told to put it away, McCarthy wrote. More than 1 ounce would be reported to law enforcement. For Holland America cruises, ships comply with federal law and don’t allow marijuana on board, said Ralph Samuels, vice president of government and community relations at cruise ship operator Holland America Group.

Holland America notifies people of what’s not allowed on the ship after they book a cruise, Samuels said. And marijuana shops in Juneau are required to have signage telling customers they aren’t allowed to take the product onto a ship or plane.

Public consumption isn’t allowed under Alaska law. You can be fined up to $100 if police bust you. Like in other states, tourists face a conundrum: If you can’t smoke in public, but don’t have a home to return to, where can you legally smoke pot? So far, there’s no good answer. The state has long discussed allowing public areas where marijuana consumption is legal, but development of those rules is still a ways out.

The public consumption fine is a citation akin to a traffic ticket and not a criminal charge. In Anchorage, six citations had been issued between January and the end of March, according to Anchorage police.

Hotel rooms are considered private property and local rules in any given city would determine what’s allowed, said Erika McConnell, director of the state’s Alcohol and Marijuana Control Office.

Many hotels have no-smoking policies. At the Westmark Baranof hotel in Juneau, general manager Steve Hamilton said that smoking marijuana in the hotel rooms would be off-limits, just like tobacco. For edibles, Hamilton said he had no way of knowing when those are brought in, and “we don’t try to be the police.”

Your best bet is to ask your AirBnB host or a staff member at your hotel or other lodging.

The Tourist's Guide To Navigating Alaska's Legal Marijuana Market

Denali National Park on May 13 (Bob Hallinen / Alaska Dispatch News)

National parks

Alaska is home to 54 million acres of federal parks and preserves. But carrying and using marijuana on these massive swaths of federal land is not allowed. If you’re caught with marijuana you could face a federal citation, which is typically a misdemeanor, according to John Quinley, National Park Service spokesman.

So far, those citations have been sparse. In the past 2 1/2 years, there have been two citations and one verbal warning to people for using marijuana, Quinley wrote. Two were in Denali National Park and Preserve and one was in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve.

Medical marijuana

If you have a medical card, it won’t go far at most marijuana shops. Alaska was one of the first states to legalize medical marijuana in 1998 but its rules don’t allow for dispensaries. In 2014, when voters legalized recreational marijuana, a separate medical system was not developed, to the chagrin[2] of some medical users. Regulators feared that if a dual system were created, medical prices and rules would undercut the regular commercial market.

A few marijuana delivery services operate in Alaska, but not with the state’s blessing. Alaska’s laws don’t allow for marijuana delivery, and two delivery services’ owners are facing criminal charges. Rules around marijuana clubs are still being considered by the Marijuana Control Board. In Anchorage, one club owner faces criminal charges and a second shut down in April.

Reporter Annie Zak contributed to this article.

Have a question about tourism and marijuana? Email [email protected]

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References

  1. ^ Alaska Marijuana News (www.adn.com)
  2. ^ to the chagrin (www.adn.com)
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