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Beltway Shooter Tordil Pleads Guilty To Murdering Wife

BOWIE, MD Beltway shooter Eulalio Tordil pleaded guilty Monday to the May 2016 murder of his estranged wife outside a Beltsville high school, according to reports. The murder of Gladys Tordil was the beginning of a string of shootings that in total killed three people and injured three others, police say. The guilty plea was entered in Prince George s County Circuit Court by Tordil, 63, of Boyds, a former federal security officer who gunned down his wife, a teacher, as she waited for her daughters in a High Point High School parking lot May 5, 2016. She had received a protective order that forbid her husband from coming near her Prince George’s County home, workplace or children. Police say Eulalio Tordil shot his estranged wife May 5, 2016, before turning the gun on a Good Samaritan who had, moments earlier, noticed the couple struggling and asked Gladys Tordil if everything was OK. Gladys Tordil was a chemistry teacher at Parkdale High School in Riverdale.

Investigators say Eulalio Tordil followed his wife to High Point High School, got out of his car and confronted Gladys Tordil as she sat in her vehicle.

I m her husband, he told the bystander before the shooting began.


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The protective order says that Eulalio who had a black belt in the martial art of aikido — slapped, shoved, and raped his wife. He also forced the two girls into rigorous discipline that included numerous push-ups and putting them in “detention” in closets, the mother told the judge, according to court papers.

The day after Tordil murdered his wife, he shot three people at the Westfield Montgomery Mall in Bethesda, then shot and killed one woman at Giant Foods in Silver Spring.

Carl Unger was at Westfield Montgomery Mall in Bethesda on May 6, 2016, to have lunch with his friend, Malcom Winffel, 45, of Boyds. Both men were shot when they tried to help a woman whose car Tordil was trying to steal, police said.

“He looked dead at us and was smiling before he started shooting,” Unger told NBC Washington[1]. The carjacking victim outside the Macy s store ran between Unger and Winffel, which is when Tordil began to fire his handgun. Unger was shot four times: Once in the shoulder, twice in the back and once in the foot. He suffered a collapsed lung as a result of one of the bullets in his back and still has a bullet in his shoulder, according to his family. Tordil was accused of the fatal shootings of Winffel and Claudina Modina, 65, of Montgomery County. Modina, a nurse, was shot in a second failed carjacking attempt at the Giant store in Silver Spring, authorities say.

Tordil pleaded guilty to two counts of first-degree murder and two counts of attempted first-degree murder in Montgomery County in April. Tordil, a former Federal Protective Service officer, had been depressed after being suspended from work, the result of complaints filed by his wife when she sought a protective order from the spouse she said had beaten and raped her for years. Eulalio Tordil told a colleague he planned to run his car off a bridge, according to prosecutors. Tordil’s plea deal calls for a sentence of life in prison[2] without parole, WTOP reports. He will be sentenced in Montgomery County July 7.

Photo of shooting suspect Eulalio Tordil courtesy of Montgomery County Police; photo of Gladys Tordil used with permission of Eric Paviat

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Originally published June 26, 2017.

More from Bowie Patch[3]

References

  1. ^ NBC Washington (www.nbcwashington.com)
  2. ^ life in prison (wtop.com)
  3. ^ More from Bowie Patch (patch.com)

The Latest: Prison security head wants to reduce segregation

The Latest on court hearing over Wisconsin youth prisons (all times local):

5:35 p.m. A federal judge says that Wisconsin’s juvenile prison for boys is a “troubled institution” that overuses segregation, pepper spray and shackles on inmates. But U.S. District Judge James Peterson said Thursday he doesn’t know if the answer is to immediately bar those practices like the American Civil Liberties Union and Juvenile Law Center is asking. Peterson says he wants to maintain safety at the prisons and he doesn’t want to overreach with whatever he orders on Friday.

Peterson made the comments to attorneys following the end of a daylong hearing on the issues. He says he hopes that both sides could agree to a plan for moving forward. But he also says he has “concerns that the problems are so severe and the harm to the residents of Lincoln Hills is so acute” that the state should be allowed to refine its use of the tactics on its own.

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4:30 p.m. The security director at Wisconsin’s juvenile prisons says he wants to reduce the amount of time that youth inmates are put into solitary confinement.

But Brian Gustke testified in federal court Thursday that there are impediments to doing that. He says those include high turnover and vacancies in prison staff that leads to forced overtime, not knowing schedules and “confusion on everyone’s part, staff as well as the youth.”

Gustke defends the tactics used by guards as a way to maintain the safety and security both of staff and inmates, while admitting that the policies that lead to someone being put into solitary confinement could be improved. He says as of Wednesday, 20 of the 173 inmates at the Lincoln Hills boys prison were in segregated units.

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1:30 p.m. Videos taken inside Wisconsin’s youth prisons showing young inmates being pepper sprayed by guards have been shown in federal court during a hearing on whether the practice is cruel and unusual punishment.

One video shown Thursday shows a young female inmate who refused to go into her room repeatedly pepper sprayed by a guard and then taken to the ground by two others. A second video shows a boy inmate being pepper sprayed in his cell after he refused to take his arms out of a slot in his door. Both were offered as evidence by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Juvenile Law Center in a lawsuit they brought challenging the use of pepper spray and other disciplinary tactics at the Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake prisons.

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11:50 a.m. An expert witness says juveniles do not need to be kept in solitary confinement, pepper sprayed or shackled at Wisconsin’s youth prisons to maintain safety.

Vincent Schiraldi testified Thursday in a federal court hearing over whether solitary confinement and other disciplinary tactics used by the state Department of Corrections are constitutional. He is the former director of juvenile corrections in Washington, D.C. and is now a researcher at the Harvard Kennedy School. He says 90 percent of prisons in the country don’t use pepper spray. But he says some juveniles in Wisconsin have been sprayed more than a dozen times a piece. Corrections officials defend the practices, saying they’re needed to maintain order and security at the prisons.

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11:20 a.m.

An expert witness says juveniles do not need to be kept in solitary confinement at Wisconsin’s youth prisons to maintain safety. Vincent Schiraldi testified Thursday in a federal court hearing over whether solitary confinement and other disciplinary tactics used by the state Department of Corrections are constitutional. He is the former director of juvenile corrections in Washington, D.C. and is now a researcher at the Harvard Kennedy School. He says some juveniles at Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake prisons spend seven or more days in a row in isolation and sometimes are not released from their cells at all during a 24-hour period.

Corrections officials defend the practice, saying it’s needed to maintain order and security at the prisons.

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10 a.m. A federal judge says it appears there is a “serious problem and an ongoing use” of pepper spray to restrain juvenile inmates at Wisconsin’s youth prisons. U.S. District Judge James Peterson during a Thursday hearing voiced numerous concerns with the state’s use of pepper spray, solitary confinement and shackling of young inmates at the Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake prisons. Civil rights groups are seeking a temporary restraining order to block the use of the disciplinary tactics while a lawsuit challenging their constitutionality is ongoing.

Department of Corrections attorney Sam Hall says the use of pepper spray has been going down all year. He says in June it was only used four times. But Peterson says it appears the only reason its use dropped was because of the lawsuit.

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9:20 a.m. A federal judge says he will not close his courtroom when two videos showing juvenile inmates being pepper-sprayed are presented as evidence at a hearing over the practice.

U.S. District Judge James Peterson said Thursday he has “very significant concerns” about a request by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Juvenile Law Center to close the courtroom when the videos are shown. They are suing the state Department of Corrections, seeking an end to the use of pepper spraying and solitary confinement at the troubled youth prisons in Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake. A group of media outlets, including The Associated Press, has asked that the hearing be open. Peterson says he will allow viewing of the videos as long as media outlets sign a non-disclosure agreement to not identify the juveniles being pepper sprayed.

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6:25 a.m.

A federal judge is set to hear evidence in a case seeking to halt the use of solitary confinement, pepper spray and the shackling of inmates at Wisconsin’s troubled youth prisons. The hearing Thursday before U.S. District Judge James Peterson comes in a lawsuit filed against the state Department of Corrections by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Juvenile Law Center. They are asking the judge to temporarily ban the disciplinary tactics at the Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake prisons while its lawsuit challenging them as unconstitutional proceeds. Attorneys asked the judge to close the hearing when videos are shown that reveal the identities of young inmates as they are pepper sprayed. A coalition of media outlets and groups was objecting to closing the hearing to show the videos.

Georgia inmates save guard’s life when he collapses during work detail

POLK COUNTY, GA (WCMH) The sheriff is calling the inmates heroes, after they saved a guard s life when he passed out during a work-detail trip. According to the Polk County, Georgia, Sheriff Johnny Moats, on Monday an officer was working security detail for the inmates at a job site when he collapsed. All six inmates at the work-release site jumped into action and began helping the officer. They grabbed the guard s work phone to call 911, and removed his gun holster, and bullet proof vest to help him breathe.

He had his face down and was breathing a little hard so we turned him over to make sure he was OK, said inmate Landon Ware.

The officer is expected to be OK, but Moats said the inmates actions are worthy of a medal. They really stepped up in a time of crisis and they showed it. They really care about my officers.

As a show of appreciation, the guard s family provided the inmates with a free lunch at the park.

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