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This year’s 4/20 event cost the City of Vancouver over $245000

VANCOUVER (NEWS 1130) This year s 4/20 marijuana day of protest in Vancouver cost the city more than $245,000. The city estimates 40,000 people were at Sunset Beach Park and the Vancouver Art Gallery during the April 20 protest. The city says in a news release that police costs came to over $170,000, while other costs such as sanitation, and fire and rescue pushed the costs even higher.

The Park Board refused to grant a permit to protest organizers, but the event went ahead without approval. The release says the bill doesn t include ambulance service or hospital costs. It says the damaged field next to Sunset Beach after the event cost about $10,000 to repair.

The city says it will bill the organizers of the Sunset Beach event to recover expenses, but it s still unclear whether they will pay.

We ve been trying to set up a lot of meetings months before, a month and a half before the event. I think we didn t give ourselves enough time to really push the conversation, but we ve met already, we ve handed over the invoice, says Michael Wiebe with the Vancouver Park Board. He adds organizers knew it was coming, and every cost was broken down. Wiebe claims organizers had an idea of the costs before the event, and staff will be sitting down with organizers again to justify costs.

The @ParkBoard[1] says 4/20 organizers knew the bill/costs were going to be high beforehand. Staff are going to have another meeting with them.

Sonia Aslam (@SoniaSAslam) May 26, 2017[2]

4/20 organizer Dana Larsen says they intend to fulfill their promise and pay back the park-board, but says some of the numbers invoiced need to be ironed out.

It s important to put these numbers in context. About a quarter of that total bill is actually for a different event that we re not affiliated with that took place at the Art Gallery. He adds the money is well-worth spent, considering the crowds generated by the annual event.

I mean we had a Trump Tower protest a few months ago. That cost $100,000 in policing and we only had a few hundred people there. This event is actually very reasonably priced for the number of people that participate, he says.

Organizer Jodie Emery from the Cannabis Cafe says paying the $245,000 is not feasible, or justified.

We re all taxpayers, we all pay for the cost of every event from music festivals to fireworks, to Vaisakhi and pride. So it would be unreasonable to demand that a bunch of volunteers who organized an event the city would have to organize themselves otherwise to pay for that. Emery says instead of asking organizers to pay the costs of things like policing and repairs to Sunset Beach, the park board and city should be thanking them for putting on the event. The activist wants to know why the annual smoke-up is being treated differently. Wiebe there is an incentive for organizers to pay sooner rather than later.

If they re working for the city s help in finding a location and working with them next year, they re probably going to want to do this quicker, because we need to find a location, settle it, put forward and emergency plan, have police, fire ready for next year s event.

References

  1. ^ @ParkBoard (twitter.com)
  2. ^ May 26, 2017 (twitter.com)

It’s Security Services, Not The White House, That Are Damaging Intelligence Alliances

Recent intelligence leaks by security agencies have frayed U.S. intelligence relationships with the United Kingdom and Israel. U.K. authorities are reportedly[1] furious with their U.S. intelligence counterparts after classified pictures of the Manchester bombing crime scene appeared[2] in The New York Times Wednesday. TheNYT report essentially amounted to damage assessment that a terrorist bomb-maker could use to improve his next deadly device, Senior Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies Shashank Joshi noted[3] on Twitter Wednesday. The Manchester Police s fury erupted Thursday when it announced[4] that it would stop sharing intelligence on the bombing with U.S. agencies until assurances could be made that the leaks would stop. U.K. Home Secretary Amber Rudd had already issued a warning Wednesday that U.S. leaks regarding the bombing were irritating.

U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May similarly[5] declared, I will make clear to President Trump that intelligence that is shared between our law enforcement agencies must remain secure. The National Police Chiefs in the council issued a damning statement after TheNYT leak, saying[6] that it damaged the U.K.-U.S. intelligence relationship. [The] damage is even greater when it involves unauthorised disclosure of potential evidence in the middle of a major counter-terrorism investigation, the statement says. President Donald Trump pledged in a Thursday statement to get the bottom of the leaks and suggested that he may even prompt prosecution of the leakers. The U.S. Embassy in London similarly tweeted Thursday that the U.S. government would launch an investigation into the leak saying:

The U.K. fracas follows reports of a discussion between President Donald Trump and Russian foreign officials regarding an Islamic State plot to down a commercial airliner. The plot was reportedly highly sensitive intelligence given to the U.S. by Israel, and Israel did not authorized anyone to share it. The original Washington Post report detailing[7] the conversation between Trump and Lavrov did not share details of the plot or the source of the intelligence. TheNYT quickly[8] outed Israel as the source of the intelligence, and details of the plot quickly began to leak into the open process.

Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman told[9] Israeli Army Radio that the country had undergone a pinpoint correction in its intelligence relationship with the U.S. adding that everything that needed to be clarified with the friends in the U.S. was done. He continued, All of the conclusions we had to draw it was all done.

Both the crime scene pictures of the Manchester bombing and the Israeli intelligence source leaks came from within U.S. security agencies to major U.S. media outlets. Both leaks have damaged U.S. intelligence relationships with critical allies.

Follow Saagar Enjeti on Twitter[10]

Send tips to [email protected][11]

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected][12].

References

  1. ^ reportedly (www.theguardian.com)
  2. ^ appeared (www.nytimes.com)
  3. ^ noted (twitter.com)
  4. ^ announced (www.bbc.com)
  5. ^ similarly (www.independent.co.uk)
  6. ^ saying (www.theguardian.com)
  7. ^ detailing (www.google.com)
  8. ^ quickly (www.google.com)
  9. ^ told (www.latimes.com)
  10. ^ Follow Saagar Enjeti on Twitter (twitter.com)
  11. ^ [email protected] (dailycaller.com)
  12. ^ [email protected] (dailycaller.com)

Crammed carry-on bags prompt new airport security measures

TAMPA, FL. Too many of us are stuffing too much into our carry-on bags. In fact, travelers cram so much into their carry-on items that TSA screeners struggle to find signs of explosives or weapons. Currently, all passengers are required to remove laptop computers from carry-on bags. But in the future, all electronics larger than cell phones, as well as food items and thick books, may be screened in their own bins.

The following airports are experimenting with this enhanced security screening process:

  • Boise (Idaho) Airport
  • Colorado Springs Airport
  • Detroit Metropolitan Airport
  • Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood (Florida) International Airport
  • Logan International Airport in Boston
  • Los Angeles International Airport
  • Lubbock (Texas) Preston Smith International Airport
  • Luis Mu oz Mar n International Airport in San Juan, Puerto Rico
  • McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas
  • Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport

The TSA will analyze if the screening method improves the screening process, and whether or not it speeds up, or bogs down, lines.

If the pilot program is a success, the TSA may roll out the program to all airports, with new rules implemented after the summer travel rush, once screeners are trained, and announcements made.

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References

  1. ^ Follow Meredyth Censullo on Facebook (www.facebook.com)
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