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Petition: Move Melania Trump to White House, or she can foot security bill

More than 108,000 people have signed a petition urging First Lady Melania Trump to move to the White House or pay for security costs at Trump Tower herself. The Change.org petition[1] was started after a senior White House aide indicated the president s wife and son, Barron, will remain in New York until the school year ends. It ll be delivered to Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren if at least 150,000 people sign.

The U.S. taxpayer is paying an exorbitant amount of money to protect the First Lady in Trump Tower, located in New York City, the petition reads. As to help relieve the national debt, this expense yields no positive results for the nation and should be cut from being funded.

Petition: Move Melania Trump To White House, Or She Can Foot Security Bill CBS This Morning

Melania Trump’s approach as first lady

First lady Melania Trump was next to her husband, Donald Trump, when he assumed the presidency on Friday, but she will not be constantly at his s… The NYPD estimated it costs between $127,000 and $146,000 per day to protect Mrs. Trump and Barron while President Trump is out of town, according to the New York Times. The cost to guard Mr. Trump and his family between the election and Inauguration Day reached $24 million, the NYPD said.

Comments beneath the Change.org petition highlighted the signers dissatisfaction over the first family s use of taxpayer funds.

Living in the White House is what you do when you are married to the president, one commenter identified as Sheila Forsyth of Newport, Rhode Island, wrote. The tax money saved by eliminating these extra protection expenses can be used to feed senior citizens. Why is our tax money being spent on people who already have more than their fair share?

Melania Trump is the only first lady since Anna Harrison[2] not to make the White House her residence. Barron Trump, the son of the president and the first lady, attends school in New York. Trump s frequent weekend trips to his private club Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida, have also spurred criticism over costs to secure a non-White House location[3], on top of travel costs.

References

  1. ^ Change.org petition (www.change.org)
  2. ^ only first lady since Anna Harrison (www.cbsnews.com)
  3. ^ costs to secure a non-White House location (www.cbsnews.com)

While you were sleeping: Shooting hoops and web-slinging

Here s our roundup of the best and brightest stories this morning.

Ramping up construction: Notre-Dame-de-Gr ce is getting all-new access to the D carie[1], thanks to plans to construct an on-ramp just west of Prud homme Ave. This will connect St-Jacques St. with Highway 15 northbound. Officials say this plan will be realized by the time the Turcot Interchange reconstruction project is completed on deadline in 2020. Those fond of the plan say it ll help mitigate traffic issues that have affected eastern N.D.G since the superhospital opened on the Glen site. Councillor Peter McQueen was cautiously optimistic about the sketches: It s still not a full engineering drawing, but it looks more serious.

A also stands for awesome: Brianna Hoops Green brought the Harlem Globetrotters version of hoop dreams to Westmount High School[2], but not before giving the enrapt students a brief pep talk about the ABCs of bullying prevention: A stands for action, B stands for bravery, C stands for compassion, she said, revealing that she herself had been picked on, growing up. I would hear it but I didn t let it affect me. If I had let them hold me back or get in my head, I wouldn t be as successful as I am today.

While You Were Sleeping: Shooting Hoops And Web-slinging

The Big Maple Leaf on display at Berlin s Bode Museum. Thieves stole the gold coin with a face value of $1 million on March 27, 2017. MARCEL METTELSIEFEN / AFP/Getty Images

If only Spider-Man had been there: Burglars stole a 100-kilogram, solid-gold coin worth $4 million from a Berlin museum in a heist out of a Hollywood movie. A security guard at the Bode Museum alerted police that the coin which carries Queen Elizabeth II s imprint and is called Big Maple Leaf had been removed from its case. The perpetrators were able to circumvent the alarm system. A ladder that might have been used in the plot was found on nearby train tracks. The coin, which was on loan from a private owner and had been on display since 2007 is as big as a car tire and was issued by the Royal Canadian Mint in 2007.

But Spider-Man was here: Sony Pictures unveiled the second trailer for Spider-Man: Homecoming at CinemaCon, featuring Tom Holland, the newly anointed web-slinger, being put in his place by Robert Downey Jr. s more seasoned Tony Stark. The film, out July 7, picks up with Holland s Peter Parker returning to high school after the events of Captain America: Civil War, and wanting to immediately get back into the action as a new threat emerges from Michael Keaton s Vulture. Other movies teased at the con were Blade Runner 2049, Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, and the Stephen King adaptation The Dark Tower.

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Montreal Gazette, Canadian Press, Associated Press

References

  1. ^ all-new access to the D carie (montrealgazette.com)
  2. ^ hoop dreams to Westmount High School (montrealgazette.com)

Nova Scotia Course Teaches Retail Workers How To Not Be Racist

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Nova Scotia Course Teaches Retail Workers How To Not Be Racist

HALIFAX More than a decade after racial profiling was identified as a festering problem among some police forces, it is now being addressed in another sector: retailing. After years of complaints about retail staff who routinely follow, search, ignore, insult and provide poor service to visible minorities, one province has decided to do something about it in a big way. On Monday, the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission launched a free, online training program aimed at preventing a problem that has sparked a growing chorus of complaints across the country.

The 20-minute interactive course for front-line service staff described as the first of its kind in Canada has already attracted attention from businesses in other provinces and the United States, and plans are in the works to roll out a national campaign.

Nova Scotia Course Teaches Retail Workers How To Not Be Racist
Lennett Anderson, senior pastor at Emmanuel Baptist Church, speaks as Justice Minister Diana Whalen, and Christine Hanson, CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, look on in Dartmouth, N.S. on Monday.

“As a proud African Nova Scotian and seventh-generation Canadian … I am acutely aware of the problems associated with navigating race relations in our society,” Rev. Lennett Anderson of the African United Baptist Association of Nova Scotia told a news conference at the Halifax Chamber of Commerce.

“The need for a campaign such as this is a desperate one … It is worthy of our celebration.”

The retail sector is Canada’s largest employer, with over two million people working in an industry that generated $59 billion in payroll in 2015.

“The need for a campaign such as this is a desperate one … ”
Rev. Lennett Anderson

Christine Hanson, CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, said the need for such a training program was reinforced in 2013 when the commission released a groundbreaking report that concluded aboriginal people and African Canadians more often reported being treated poorly by retail staff than did any other group.

“In fact, people from all racialized groups, including Asian, Latin American and Middle Eastern people, reported being treated poorly by staff far more than did white people,” the report said. “In the focus groups, several participants commented on being made to feel ‘lower class’ or like ‘second-class citizens’ when shopping.”

Nova Scotia Course Teaches Retail Workers How To Not Be Racist
Christine Hanson, CEO of the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, announces an online training course dealing with consumer racial profiling to educate retail businesses, in Dartmouth, N.S. on Monday.

The report went on to say that aboriginal people, African Canadians, and Muslims were all targets of offensive language and were treated as if they were physically threatening and potential thieves.

“A person who is a member of a visible minority group is three times more likely to be followed in a store, and four times more likely to be searched,” Hanson said. The online program, called “Serving All Customers Better[1],” includes a quiz about immigration and visible minorities. It also cites statistics from the 2013 report and clearly spells out what the law says. The course also cites some examples, at one point quoting a worker who said: “I worked for a retailer who said, ‘The eagle has landed,’ when a black person walked into the store. I quit my job over it.”

Examples of consumer racial profiling continue to make headlines across the country.

In October 2015, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario agreed with a woman who said she faced discrimination as a black person when she was confronted by a Shoppers Drug Mart employee who demanded to search her backpack on suspicion of shoplifting. The tribunal ordered the store to pay Mary McCarthy $8,000. And in February 2015, Calgary university student Jean Ventose said he was racially profiled when he was followed by a security guard inside a local Walmart, apparently for no reason. He posted a video on the encounter on Facebook, which received more than one million views and 10,000 reactions in two days. In August 2016, one of Canada’s largest grocery chains withdrew its appeal of a human rights decision that found an employee of Sobeys had discriminated against a black customer in May 2009 after falsely accusing her of being a repeat shoplifter.

Sobeys said it reached a settlement with the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission and would apologize to Andrella David, pay her $21,000 in compensation, and develop a staff training program on racial profiling. The company faced a boycott by a group of 19 churches in the province. As well, Nova Scotia’s first black lieutenant-governor, Mayann Francis, came forward to reveal that she, too, had been the victim of repeated racial profiling while shopping. At the time, Francis said Nova Scotia was in a state of denial when it came to racial profiling, saying she had often been the victim of “shopping while black” since she left her viceregal post in 2012.

“It does not matter how successful you are, it still can happen to you,” said Francis, who had previously served as CEO of the province’s human rights commission.

Nova Scotia Course Teaches Retail Workers How To Not Be Racist
Former lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia, Mayann Francis, says she has experienced racial profiling while shopping.

“It’s just so wrong and so hurtful and I know how I feel when I’m followed in the stores … They’re stalking you.”

Earlier in the year, the Hudson’s Bay Company agreed to educate its staff about racial profiling as part of a settlement in the case of a now-deceased Nova Scotia grandmother allegedly accused of shoplifting a rug from a Zellers outlet in 2008.

“It’s just so wrong and so hurtful and I know how I feel when I’m followed in the stores … They’re stalking you.”
Mayann Francis, First black lieutenant-governor of Nova Scotia

Anderson, the pastor at Emmanuel Baptist Church in Hammonds Plains, N.S., said the new online course in Nova Scotia marks a big step forward for visible minorities.

“Today, we are engaging in a courageous conversation,” he said. “We have decided that it’s time to confront major issues in our society … Race is not a card we play, it’s a life we live … This campaign is not about behaviour modification, it’s about a societal transformation.”

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References

  1. ^ Serving All Customers Better (www.servingall.ca)