News by Professionals 4 Professionals

jobs

Get a job next month at cyber security career fair in downtown …

A number of local and national employers will be on hand next month during the National Cyber Summit Cyber Job Fair in Huntsville[1]. The career event will take place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 7 at the Von Braun Center South Hall. Booz Allen Hamilton, COLSA, Deloitte, DESE Research, SAIC and other companies will be available.

“The shortage of talented cyber security professionals has never been higher,” said Kathleen Smith of ClearedJobs.Net and CyberSecJobs.com. “Job fairs are an effective tool to close the gap of unfilled cyber security positions. We survey the companies attending our job fairs and consistently over 90 percent of them successfully hire talent they meet at the event.”

The event will be open to cleared and non-cleared cyber security professionals and college students enrolled in cyber degree programs. Still Serving Veterans will offer free resume reviews from at the fair. Registration is free. Click here[2] for details.

References

  1. ^ Cyber Job Fair in Huntsville (clearedjobs.net)
  2. ^ Click here (clearedjobs.net)

MDSP Officer Changes Lives

SPRINGFIELD Jackie Peters applied for a prison job just so someone would quit pestering her about it.

“I was living in Irene, and my stepson had a friend who was working (at Mike Durfee State Prison) in Springfield. He was always hounding me about getting a job there,” she said.

“I said, Are you kidding me? There s no way I was going to work in a prison, and there s no way they re going to hire me. I m 40 years old, a female, and they would have to hire me at first for a job at the Hill (state penitentiary in Sioux Falls). But I told him that I would try so he would get off my case.”

She was wrong about the outcome. She was hired in January 1993, working the cell areas and guard towers at the penitentiary. She had already shown her ability to break new ground when she joined the National Guard

“I believe I was I was the first woman to join the South Dakota National Guard,” she said. “They started accepting women Oct. 1, 1973, and I joined Oct. 13, 1973. I stayed in the Guard until 1987.”

When she was hired for the Sioux Falls prison job, Peters informed officials she would be interested in working at the medium-security facility in Springfield, closer to her hometown of Avon.

“They had an opening at Springfield, and I got a job there shortly after I started in Sioux Falls,” she said. “I m not sure, if I had stayed in Sioux Falls, if I would have remained (in corrections) that long.”

A quarter-century after she was hired, Peters will retire June 8 from a career that has seen her rise through the ranks. She now works as the MDSP tool-and-key control sergeant. A formally trained locksmith, she is entrusted with all the prison s keys, keeps them in good working condition and maintains a regular inventory.

She joined the MDSP staff in the early years after the former college was converted into a prison in 1984. She served there when the facility was co-ed and later converted to an all-male facility.

As part of that conversion, she helped with the start-up of the women s prison in Pierre. During the course of the special assignment, she found herself in the unlikely role of eating crab legs at then-Gov. Bill Janklow s mansion.

“Before the women s prison was built, I took female trustys to Pierre. They stayed at the National Guard Armory while they did community service work to see if they would fit (with the community),” Peters said. “We had them working at the Capitol and the governor s mansion. For one of their assignments, they served a meal at the governor s mansion. Gov. Janklow was hosting a very official dinner with crab legs on the menu.”

Peters remained in the kitchen area, supervising the inmates. A woman on the governor s staff invited Peters to sit down and join her for supper in another room while the dinner was under way.

“Here I was, eating crab legs in the governor s mansion,” Peters said with a laugh. “I wasn t eating with the governor, but he did talk to me later when the dinner was finished and the guests left.”

TACKLING DISASTERS

Peters would talk to Janklow other times in less pleasant surroundings. She transported inmate crews to assist with natural disasters, where the governor was directing operations with his trademark take-charge manner.

“We had inmates working after the tornados at Spencer and Oglala (in the late 1990s),” Peters said.

The two disaster scenes contained different sights and needs. Spencer, a small town located in eastern South Dakota, was nearly wiped off the map. Oglala, located on the reservation in western South Dakota, saw destruction spread over a wide area.

“When we stepped off the bus at Spencer, I just thought, Oh, my gosh! This used to be a town, ” Peters said. “And at Oglala, a number of people there lived in trailer homes, and tornados and trailer houses don t get along.”

The inmates did what they could to help victims recover lost personal items, Peters said. The prisoners picked up debris, sacked up what was salvageable and allowed residents to claim what remained.

In addition, Peters supervised female inmates trained in firefighting.

“I spent an entire summer in the Black Hills because of continuous forest fires. The women learned everything from chainsaw training to wearing protective gear,” she said. “As an incentive, the inmates normally received 25 cents an hour for their work, but if they worked as firefighters they received 38 cents an hour. That was like getting time-and-a-half pay.

“At the end of the year, if they had done firefighting and had no major disciplinary issues on their record, the governor would give them so many days off their sentence for working on disasters.”

OTHER ROLES

In addition, Peters supervised female inmates who worked on the South Dakota State Fairgrounds in Huron. The one-year assignment in the 1990s saw her drive a busload of workers each week to Huron, where they stayed in the National Guard Armory.

“At first, the female inmates would look around and say, I don t know why they re bringing us up here, we don t know how to do any of this. But they learned it and did it, from repairing buildings, putting up new ones and cutting down trees,” Peters said.

“The guy that was in charge of the fairgrounds tracked day by day what the women accomplished. He also saw their attitude change, how they went from saying We can t do that to I can do that. He said it was probably the best the fairgrounds had ever looked up to that point, maybe because the women would add extra touches when they did things like plant flowers.”

The female inmates also received compliments from fairgoers on the grounds, which further boosted the prisoners confidence, Peters said.

In addition to her special assignments, Peters was one of the first members of the MDSP Disturbance Control Squad. which handles inmate uprisings.

“If there was ever a disturbance at the prison, we had a calling tree for contacting the members. You would suit up in your helmet and grab your shield and baton, if you needed to take any action against inmates who were being unruly and didn t listen,” she said.

“Eventually, I was commander of it. The squad was limited to people who offered to be on it. You applied, they determined if you were physically fit enough, and we had training once a month. I ve been sprayed with pepper spray and tear gas (as part of the training), but I was never tazered.”

The only major disturbance came during the “salad riot,” when MDSP inmates protested over the salad bar and other food service offerings.

“It was over in a day, a day and a half. It didn t take long,” she said. “The facility was surrounded by law enforcement and highway patrol, but they stayed on the outside while we were on the inside.”

In addition to her other duties, Peters maintains MDSP operations policies and has developed a record-keeping system for fire deployments, which lists 1,707 male and female inmates who have gone through firefighter training.

She has worked the entire gamut of corrections, from all men and all women to a co-ed prison to juveniles. The latter came while the State Training School operated in Plankinton.

HISTORIC CHANGES

Peters has seen the Springfield prison change tremendously over the years. Besides changing from a co-ed to all-male facility, the prison has added a barracks unit allowing the former population of 800 inmates to increase to around 1,250.

MDSP has sought to prepare inmates for the outside world and help them prevent a return to prison through vocational, academic, religious and cultural programs; counseling and substance abuse programs; and other innovations.

The prison has seen a major change outside its fences.

During its early history, MDSP had only the Missouri River to the south, cutting off one escape route for inmates. The Chief Standing Bear Memorial Bridge was built in the 1990s between Running Water and Niobrara, Neb., spanning the river and linking the two states.

Rather than think of the bridge as an escape route, MDSP has found it as a valuable link to a large pool of prison employees in northeast Nebraska, Peters said.

“The bridge has helped us immensely in terms of staff,” she said. “We have a lot of staff who come from Nebraska that we didn t have before the bridge, when they had to go around Yankton or Pickstown. Now, we have a lot of those Nebraskans as really good staff members.”

And it s those people both staff members and inmates that she will miss when she retires in just a few days.

“I surprised myself when I applied for that first job and got it. I thought, There was no way on God s green earth I was going to get it, ” she said. “But I got it, and I shocked myself. I enjoyed just about every aspect of it. I m going to really miss the people. The time has gone so fast, and I wouldn t trade it for the world.”

As she prepares to depart the prison, Peters hopes she helped others find a better path along the way.

“Now, I can look back and say, I did make a difference in someone s life,” she said.

Follow @RDockendorf on Twitter.

Security guard suspended after video shows him throwing shoes at a homeless man

A Toronto security guard has been suspended following the release of a video that appears to show him throwing a pair of shoes at a homeless person lingering on Yonge Street this week. The quarrel between the pair began just after 8 a.m. Wednesday, during the morning rush to work. The video shows the man and a security guard weaving through an onslaught of pedestrians.

Caught on video

The video that captures the next moments is shaky at first, but the guard is standing in front of a building at 60 Yonge St. He takes off his jacket, walks toward the other man, and then appears to throw something at him. The argument continues until the guard picks up the homeless man’s shoes and throws them at him. One strikes the man in the ribs, the other in the back of his leg.

The person who recorded the video did not want to be identified. But the videographer wrote in an email to CBC News about seeing the security guard punch the homeless man before the filming began.

Security firm investigates

The security guard works for GardaWorld, which told CBC Toronto it is investigating the incident.

“GardaWorld was forwarded the video taken by the bystander. Upon receipt, it was immediately transferred to our corporate security team for investigation,” the firm said in a written statement. “The employee in question has been suspended pending further investigation.”

It’s unclear whether the incident could result in criminal charges.

Security Guard Suspended After Video Shows Him Throwing Shoes At A Homeless Man

This security guard is under investigation after being caught on video throwing shoes at a homeless man. (Submitted to CBC)

Const. Victor Kwong said that just by looking at the video, it’s hard to tell whether the security guard breached any laws.

“What we have to do is keep in mind of what this didn’t capture as well,” Kwong said. “We have to step back and take a look at the whole picture and see why it is the situation got to where it is.”

A spokesperson for the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty said regardless of what sparked the altercation, the security worker acted inappropriately.

“I’m sure that security guard has his own side, but I don’t think that there’s any good explanation for why someone could act that way,” A.J. Withers said.

‘Homeless people are invisible to most people.’ – A.J. Withers, Ontario Coalition Against Poverty

This happens far too often in Toronto, the poverty advocate said.

“Homeless people are dehumanized all the time and often victims of violence,” Withers said. “I’m sure it’s shocking to many people but, sadly, it’s something that we hear about or see all the time.”

The man in the video told CBC Toronto that he has been homeless for several years. Several people can be seen walking by him during the confrontation, but no one tried to stop it.

“It’s heartbreaking that no one intervenes, but it’s also not surprising,” Withers said. “That’s what you see on the street all the time, right? Homeless people are invisible to most people.”