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The Boarding Door is Now Closed

The Boarding Door Is Now Closed Jeff Wells

You arrive at the airport an hour and a half early to catch a flight for that awesome vacation you ve had planned for months now, but when you arrive the security line is out the door and there s no way you re going to make your flight. What do you do? Airports can easily be one of the most stressful places in the world to navigate if you have little experience with travel or if you just have high anxiety! Let s break down airports into several categories:

1. National travel within the US

  • Give yourself at least 2 hours from the time you walk through the door to the airport to when your flight is scheduled to leave.
  • At bigger airports such as Atlanta, Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, etc. you may consider arriving closer to 2 or 3 hours early.
  • Make sure you have transportation to the airport worked out ahead of time. If someone is taking you make sure they know when to be at your location and when you need to be at the airport. If you are driving make sure you know the parking situation before you go.
  • Check in online before your flight with your cell phone or laptop to cut down on time waiting.
  • Pack all everything in a carry on so you don t have to wait to check your bags.
  • Know if you have status with the airline. Most airlines will have designated lines for those who have flight status and they re much shorter than normal lines.
  • Know the baggage weight limit to avoid having to rearrange your entire luggage.
  • Apply for TSA Pre-check and avoid waiting in a long security line.
  • Get to your gate 20 minutes before boarding starts, so that you will be aware of any delays or gate changes.

2. International travel to other countries from the US

  • Arrive at least 2 hours early for your flight since you are flying internationally and may need more time to negotiate lines and passport lanes.
  • At bigger airports give yourself at least 3 hours before your flight leaves.
  • If you are making connecting flights give yourself at least an hour and a half or more at your connection so that you don t miss your international flight should your first flight have some delays.
  • Have your passport and travel documents ready and accessible.
  • Apply for global entry so that you can use shorter lines when leaving and entering countries with your passport.
  • If you plan on getting food or beverages for your flight do so after going through security and always go to your gate first to make sure there haven t been any gate changes or delays.
  • Be ready to go at your gate 15-20 minutes before your flight starts boarding.

3. Traveling nationally while in a foreign country (You ve been in Berlin but now you want to go to Hamburg for example)

  • Give yourself at least 2 hours to navigate the airport since there may be language barriers.
  • Arrange transportation to the airport before the day of your flight to prevent any mishaps.
  • Have your passport accessible as well as any documents needed to travel within the country.
  • If you re traveling with an unfamiliar airline be sure to check their website the night before for any luggage restrictions, special requirements, or rules that you may not have been told.
  • If you need help don t be afraid to ask someone like a gate agent or security officer who may be more likely to speak English.
  • Travel light so you don t have to check a bag in an unfamiliar airport with possible language barriers.
  • Make sure you know exactly what city you re flying to because some places have airports and cities with similar names and different spellings.

4. Traveling internationally from a foreign country (You ve been in Brazil but now you want to see Argentina for example)

  • Give yourself between 2 and 2 hours to navigate the airport.
  • Arrange your transportation to the airport the night before.
  • Make sure to have your passport, visa, and any other travel documents you may need to get through foreign security.
  • Research your airline s guidelines before you get there if you ve never traveled with them.
  • Be aware that some small airline companies may try to nickel and dime you for silly things like inflight meal service, checked luggage, and priority seating.
  • Make sure to purchase any food or beverages after getting through security to avoid any issues in the security line.

Whether traveling near or far, navigating an airport can often be the most stressful part of the trip! Keep these helpful tips in mind wherever you go and alleviate some of the stresses of travel!

Warren park police program results in arrest of coach, 50 citations in first months

During the first two months of the park police program in Warren County parks, Warren County Sheriff’s Deputy Wayne Mayfield has made three arrests including one assistant coach, issued more than 50 citations, investigated five collisions, assisted adults on two different occasions when children were accidentally locked in cars and managed a variety of other incidents.

“We’re glad to have Wayne,” parks director Chris Kummer said. “He’s staying pretty busy. I wish we would have done this six or seven years ago. I think it would have deterred several of the issues of the last several years.”

Mayfield began working in the parks April 17. Kummer introduced the idea of a park police program to Warren County Fiscal Court in February following a melee among parents at a children’s recreational basketball game and more than 100 instances since 2013 of other criminal behavior by adult spectators in children’s sports. Last year in Division 1AA football, which serves players who are 5 to 7 years old, Kummer ended the season early after an adult spectator stabbed another adult spectator in the eye with a broken beer bottle at a football game Oct. 25 in Basil Griffin Park. The incident occurred between two games, and there were 500 to 600 people in attendance, with many of those people being very young children. Fiscal court and the sherif’s office partnered with the parks department to create the park police program.

“I think having the sheriff’s office support our park police program has really helped mitigate issues,” Kummer said. “We’ve gone through our tournament season for baseball and softball and had fewer issues than in previous seasons.”

Mayfield, a 39-year law enforcement veteran and retired Kentucky State Police trooper, previously worked at Western Kentucky University Police Department and as a court security officer for the sheriff’s office. Mayfield said in his park police position he is incorporating community policing with the knowledge he gained as a state trooper.

“I want to be visible to the people that I need to be visible but invisible to the people who are there to enjoy the park surroundings,” Mayfield said. Hopefully my presence can be more preventative.

“I do stay busy,” he said. “Fortunately over the last two months things haven’t been bad. I get up and walk around at the ballgames.”

Mayfield also eliminated a backlog of more than 400 background checks for applications and created a 24-hour turnaround on new applications for people who want to either work or volunteer for park activities. Kummer said Mayfield’s presence has been well received and a welcome sight for people who want to safely enjoy recreational opportunities in the county’s parks.

“He’s highly visible,” Kummer said. “He’s talking to families and kids while at the same time, he’s in law enforcement mode which makes people feel more secure.”

After the beer bottle incident in 2016, Kummer had at least 50 people who told him they did not feel comfortable bringing their kids to the parks. Kummer doesn’t want to run a reactive parks department. Instead, he hopes that having a park police program is a proactive step in preventing criminal activity. With the building of two new gymnasiums one at Ephram White and another at Mike Buchanon parks each gym will have a law enforcement substation.

The park policing program could potentially expand as the community and park programming expands, Kummer said.

“Yes, I think there will be a need at some point for expansion, but we are also living within our means,” Kummer said.

Many large national tournaments that are economic boons for this area also require a parks department to either have private security or law enforcement presence during the games.

“I’m really glad we’re able to have this program,” Kummer said. “I think it’s a prime example of county government at its best. We’re in the business of providing quality services to the citizens that we serve.

“It’s an integrative partnership that combined meets the law enforcement and the recreational opportunity needs of the taxpaying public,” Kummer said.

Cindy expected to drench Tennessee, Kentucky, West Virginia

Photo: DAVID_GRUNFELD, AP

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Wth a rising tide, strong southerly winds from Tropical Depression Cindy lash the lakefront Thursday, June 22, 2017 in Mandeville, La. (David Grunfeld/NOLA.com The Times-Picayune via AP)

Wth a rising tide, strong southerly winds from Tropical Depression Cindy lash the lakefront Thursday, June 22, 2017 in Mandeville, La. (David Grunfeld/NOLA.com The Times-Picayune via AP)

Photo: DAVID_GRUNFELD, AP

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Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Photo: Rick Hickman, AP

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A police officer stands guard after a possible tornado touched down destroying several businesses, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Fairfield, Ala. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey says the threat of severe weather has not concluded as the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy pushes inland. Ivey in a Thursday press briefing urged people to stay vigilant. A possible tornado touched down destroying several businesses, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Fairfield, Ala. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey says the threat of severe weather has not concluded as the remnants of Tropical Storm Cindy pushes inland. Ivey in a Thursday press briefing urged people to stay vigilant.

A mailbox sticks out of water during neighborhood flooding after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. A mailbox sticks out of water during neighborhood flooding after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Photo: Gerald Herbert, AP

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A car drives through a partially submerged roadway after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. A car drives through a partially submerged roadway after Tropical Storm Cindy, now downgraded to Tropical Depression Cindy, in Big Lake, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Photo: Gerald Herbert, AP

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Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Water levels rise after a combination of high tide and the rain from Tropical Storm Cindy in Lake Charles, La., Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Rick Hickman/American Press via AP)

Photo: Rick Hickman, AP

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Jordan Fortune, 3, laughs as a wave churned up by Tropical Depression Cindy hits a sea wall at the harbor in Pass Christian, Miss., on Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Jordan Fortune, 3, laughs as a wave churned up by Tropical Depression Cindy hits a sea wall at the harbor in Pass Christian, Miss., on Thursday, June 22, 2017.

Photo: Jay Reeves, AP

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A house alongside State Highway 87 sits on a small island after Tropical Storm Cindy brought high tides as it made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP) Crews work to clear sand and debris from State Highway 87 after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)( Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle )

Debris covers State Highway 87 after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula in Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle )

Debris covers State Highway 87 after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall earlier Thursday, June 22, 2017 on the Bolivar Peninsula in Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo / Houston Chronicle )

Photo: Michael Ciaglo, AP

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In this image taken from video, Erin West walks down a flooded street in her neighborhood after Tropical Storm Cindy, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Ocean Springs, Miss. Persistent drainage problems frustrate residents, some of whom couldn’t drive to work because of the storm, West said, and others are worried about the possibility of alligators coming into their yards in the floodwaters. A man shields himself from the rain while riding his bicycle on the intersection of St. Emmanuel and Leeland streets Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Houston as Tropical Storm Cindy hit Southeast Texas and the Gulf Coast. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Debris is removed after it covered TX-87 as a results of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. ( Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Debris is removed after it covered TX-87 as a results of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. ( Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Elizabeth Conley, AP

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Jeffery Chheang works at Dannay’s Donuts on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. Chheang said the Tropical Storm Cindy seems to have made it slower at the store. “Usually we get families on vacation in, but so far, we’ve really only had locals.” ( Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Tommy Bomar, of High Island, Texas, checks out the waves as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Tommy Bomar, of High Island, Texas, checks out the waves as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Elizabeth Conley, AP

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Water and debris, washed up past the beach by Tropical Storm Cindy, sit on Kahla Drive Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Crystal Beach, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Water and debris, washed up past the beach by Tropical Storm Cindy, sit on Kahla Drive Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Crystal Beach, Texas. ( Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Michael Ciaglo, AP

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A woman walks along the beach the morning after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall Thursday, June 22, 2017, on the Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

A woman walks along the beach the morning after Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall Thursday, June 22, 2017, on the Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Michael Ciaglo, AP

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Debris covers TX-87 as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Debris covers TX-87 as a result of Tropical Storm Cindy on Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Bolivar Peninsula, Texas. (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Photo: Elizabeth Conley, AP

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