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REPORT: Missouri Tops List for Highest Black Homicide Rate in US

The 2017 edition of the Violence Policy Center[1] s (VPC) annual study reveals that while Black Americans represent just 13 percent of the population, they account for half of all homicide victims and Missouri has the highest rate of Black homicides in the nation.

Black Homicide Victimization in the United States: An Analysis of 2014 Homicide Data[2] analyzes the most recent set of unpublished Supplementary Homicide Report data that states submitted to the FBI. The VPC reports that this is the first analysis of this data set that focuses on Black homicide victims. Per the report, there were 6,095 Black homicide victims in the United States in 2014, and 86 percent of them were men. The national homicide rate was 4.19 per 100,000, but for Blacks, that rate jumped to 16.38. For their White counterparts, it was just 2.52. When broken down by state, Missouri had the highest Black homicide rate. At 34.98 per 100,000, it was more than double the national average for Black victims. Hawaii, New Hampshire and Vermont tied for the lowest rate, with zero Black homicide victims. The data includes deaths that are reported as justifiable homicides at the hands of law enforcement. For 2014, the reported number was 115.

REPORT: Missouri Tops List For Highest Black Homicide Rate In USColorlines screenshot of Violence Policy Center’s report, taken March 28, 2017.

Each year this report reveals the devastating and disproportionate impact homicide, almost always involving a gun, has on Black men, boys, women and girls in America, Josh Sugarmann, VPC s executive director, said in a statement[3]. These deaths devastate families and traumatize whole communities. We hope our research will not only help educate the public and policymakers, but aid community leaders already working to end this grave injustice.

Read the full study here[4].

References

  1. ^ Violence Policy Center (www.vpc.org)
  2. ^ Black Homicide Victimization in the United States: An Analysis of 2014 Homicide Data (media.ne.cision.com)
  3. ^ statement (www.vpc.org)
  4. ^ here (media.ne.cision.com)

New Hampshire Journalist Not Allowed to Record Public Meeting …

New Hampshire Journalist Not Allowed To Record Public Meeting ...

Concerned about the expenses involved in the New Hampshire Justice Department s ongoing court battle to prevent voters from taking selfies in the voting booth, local activist and journalist Dave Ridley showed up to their budget workshop meeting, camera in hand, to ask members of the House Finance Committee how they felt about the mounting expenses in fighting the suit. But committee members waisted little time in telling Ridley that he would not be allowed to video record the meeting. Ridley, who has spent years covering the New Hampshire Legislature, is known for his gonzo-style journalism and his ambush interviews that often occur as representatives are arriving for public meetings and workshops. This incident was no different.

Ridley began greeting members of the committee as they arrived but as the meeting began Chairman Lynne Ober asks him, Sir, I m sorry, there is no photography in the committee room. Thank you, the chairman tells him.

Under what law would I be prohibited from filming? Ridley responds. She replies, We have house rules. Please direct that question to the speaker s office.

Well, I need to know more if you re going to censure me I need to know more, Ma am.

We are in the middle of a hearing. Ober snaps, cutting him off. Ridley continues to record the meeting though, until he is approached by what appears to be a security officer who asks him again to stop recording.

I had planned to only spend about 3 minutes in the meeting itself and leave with maybe 35 seconds worth of video of it . just enough to show people what the meeting looked like. The questionable restrictions made the meeting itself suddenly interesting. The original purpose for being in that area of the LOB was mostly to interview officials on their way to and from the meeting. As the video continues, Ridley leaves the meeting room to conduct other interviews in the hallway as more security arrives and he enters the meeting room again, camera rolling. Seconds later, A security officer Joe Burke appears in the doorway.

The video continues as Ridley is advised by members of the committee that he is being disruptive just as another committee members whips out his cell phone to begin recording Ridley.

Burke eventually escorts Ridley out of the meeting room and back into the hallway.

So did you just break the law by removing me? Ridley asks Burke.

No, I did not. You re welcome to stay in the hearing, they just said no filming No recording because it s not a public hearing. Burke responds, but Ridley s arguments against video being banned made no difference to the committee or to Burke who insisted that because the meeting was considered a work session , the chairman could forbid recording based on it being a disruption.

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New Hampshire Journalist Not Allowed to Record Public Meeting Because “House Rules”

New Hampshire Journalist Not Allowed To Record Public Meeting Because “House Rules”

Concerned about the expenses involved in the New Hampshire Justice Department s ongoing court battle to prevent voters from taking selfies in the voting booth, local activist and journalist Dave Ridley showed up to their budget workshop meeting, camera in hand, to ask members of the House Finance Committee how they felt about the mounting expenses in fighting the suit. But committee members waisted little time in telling Ridley that he would not be allowed to video record the meeting. Ridley, who has spent years covering the New Hampshire Legislature, is known for his gonzo-style journalism and his ambush interviews that often occur as representatives are arriving for public meetings and workshops. This incident was no different.

Ridley began greeting members of the committee as they arrived but as the meeting began Chairman Lynne Ober asks him, Sir, I m sorry, there is no photography in the committee room. Thank you, the chairman tells him.

Under what law would I be prohibited from filming? Ridley responds. She replies, We have house rules. Please direct that question to the speaker s office.

Well, I need to know more if you re going to censure me I need to know more, Ma am.

We are in the middle of a hearing. Ober snaps, cutting him off. Ridley continues to record the meeting though, until he is approached by what appears to be a security officer who asks him again to stop recording.

I had planned to only spend about 3 minutes in the meeting itself and leave with maybe 35 seconds worth of video of it . just enough to show people what the meeting looked like. The questionable restrictions made the meeting itself suddenly interesting. The original purpose for being in that area of the LOB was mostly to interview officials on their way to and from the meeting. As the video continues, Ridley leaves the meeting room to conduct other interviews in the hallway as more security arrives and he enters the meeting room again, camera rolling. Seconds later, A security officer Joe Burke appears in the doorway.

The video continues as Ridley is advised by members of the committee that he is being disruptive just as another committee members whips out his cell phone to begin recording Ridley. Burke eventually escorts Ridley out of the meeting room and back into the hallway.

So did you just break the law by removing me? Ridley asks Burke.

No, I did not. You re welcome to stay in the hearing, they just said no filming No recording because it s not a public hearing.

How can they ban filming? What authority do they have?

I don t think it s banning. It s a house rule. And it s disruptive to the chair and the members. Ridley s arguments against being banned made no difference to the committee or to Burke who insisted that because the meeting was considered a work session , the chairman could forbid recording based on it being a disruption.

Initially I went to preserve the video before returning to the meeting. Which ended about an hour and a half after the video ends.

This kind of thing, getting attacked lie this is sorta why we are in New Hampshire.

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