News by Professionals 4 Professionals

new jersey

Red Tail Legacy Comes Full Circle

Red Tail Legacy Comes Full Circle

Alabama Air National Guard F-16 Fighting Falcons descend into Campia Turzii, Romania, Oct. 13, 2015, after flying from Montgomery, Alabama. Four F-16 Fighting Falcons and approximately 150 Airmen from the 187th Fighter Wing, Alabama Air National Guard participated in Dacian Viper, a training deployment to Romania designed to increase readiness to conduct combined air operations and to meet future security challenges. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Bruch/Released)

Airmen assigned to the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing take great pride in the heritage created for them by the Tuskegee Airmen. Today a key piece of the wing s history has once again returned to its flightline. The legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen was born in Montgomery, Alabama, when the Tuskegee Institute s application to conduct civilian pilot training was approved by the Civil Aeronautics Administration in autumn of 1939. About one year later President Franklin D. Roosevelt s administration announced the Army Air Corps would begin training black military pilots, and the place to do it was Tuskegee, Alabama. So began the storied history of the Tuskegee Airmen. Flying their P-51 Mustangs, with tails painted bright red, the Airmen fought valiantly through World War II under the crest of the 332nd Fighter Group.

Red Tail Legacy Comes Full Circle

Now more than 75 years later, a red-tailed fighter jet from Montgomery again flies with the 332nd. The lineage of the Tuskegee Airmen has been passed to Alabama Air National Guard s 187th Fighter Wing. An F-16 Fighting Falcon from the unit is currently flying with the 134th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, which is one of the squadrons assigned to the 332nd AEW. It is well documented that our WWII bomber pilots would look out their windows and gain confidence from Red Tail fighters flying beside them. It has been stated they took comfort in knowing their chances for survival were higher with a Red Tail escort than from any other outfit in 12th and 15th Air Force, said Col. David C. Lyons, 407th Air Expeditionary Group commander. Now we have one of those Red Tails on our flight line, once again flying with the 332nd and creating the next chapter of Red Tail history.

Red Tail Legacy Comes Full Circle

An F-16 from the Alabama Air National Guard arrives at the 407th Air Expeditionary Group where it is assigned to the 134th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron in support of Operation Inherent Resolve Dec. 10, 2016. The red tail flash of the jet brings the Tuskegee Airmen s legacy back the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing, to which the 134th EFS is currently assigned. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson)(Released)

The mission of the unit is to support Operation Inherent Resolve in the fight against ISIS by providing air-to-ground combat airpower at the request of the Combined Joint Task Force commander. The 134th EFS has been heavily involved in the fight, flying more than 500 missions, delivering more than 800 weapons, and making significant contributions to the fight in Mosul, Iraq, and Raqqa, Syria. We are talking about liberating cities, Lyons said. That is something we haven t talked about in this way since World War II.

The Airmen of the 134th EFS flying the missions to liberate cities in Iraq and Syria are deployed from the Vermont Air National Guard. The red tail was provided to the Vermont ANG along with F-16s from the New Jersey and Wisconsin Air National Guards to ensure the squadron had enough capable aircraft to meet the short-notice deployment to support OIR. At least one Airman from the Vermont ANG takes a special amount of pride in seeing the red tail on the flightline with his unit. During a formal dinner hosted by the Vermont ANG, Chief Master Sgt. Brian Senecal, 407th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron, had the opportunity to host Col. Charles McGee. McGee is one of the Tuskegee Airmen and also holds a U.S. Air Force record for flying 409 combat missions in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War.

Honestly it was the highlight of my whole military career to spend time with the guy to meet someone who gave some much, Senecal said. Most Soldiers and Sailors were welcomed back from World War II with open arms and the Tuskegee Airmen had to come back to a still-segregated America. Despite the discrimination the Tuskegee Airmen faced at the time, their trailblazing efforts have left a legacy of which all Airmen can be proud. It is an honor to continue the tradition started by the original Tuskegee Airmen and to be carrying on their good name 75 years later, Senecal said.

Story by Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson [1][2]

407th Air Expeditionary Group[3]

You may also like:

References

  1. ^ Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson (www.dvidshub.net)
  2. ^ RSS feed for Master Sgt. Benjamin Wilson (www.dvidshub.net)
  3. ^ 407th Air Expeditionary Group (www.dvidshub.net)

Jordan confronts protesters, finds no common ground

Jordan Confronts Protesters, Finds No Common GroundChip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Related content

FREMONT, Ohio (CNN) – Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan acknowledged protesters outside two events in his home district Monday — a break with many other Capitol Hill colleagues who have largely avoided such scenes — but was met with shouts of disapproval. The Ohio Republican, a 10-year veteran of the House and one of its most ardent conservatives, spoke with what his staff and protesters estimated were upward of 150 demonstrators in Marion, Ohio, at the historic home of former President Warren G. Harding. He then headed about an hour north where he talked briefly with a much smaller group of protesters at the Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Library in Fremont, Ohio, before heading into a presidential trivia contest for children (which prompted his former Democratic opponent to claim he was using the kids as “human shields”).

Jordan’s tour of his sprawling Ohio district Monday showed the dilemma for lawmakers eyeing up a repeat of the tea party protests which swept Democrats out of power in Congress in 2010 — but with the fire and the threat coming from the left this time. And it also shows how deep the anger has bled into staunchly conservative territory. Jordan beat his Democratic opponent 68 percent-32 percent last year and President Donald Trump won the district by a similar margin. The first hint of trouble for Republicans came two weeks ago, when Utah Republican Jason Chaffetz was confronted by hundreds of angry protesters at his town hall. Since then, Republican lawmakers have canceled town halls, while others have split town entirely — heading on Congressional delegation trips to spots like the Mexican border and Europe. Meanwhile, some Republicans have fully embraced the fury: Rep. Mark Sanford huddled hundreds of protesters at his South Carolina town hall this past weekend, even walking outside to address an overflow crowd.

Jordan didn’t give it the “Full Sanford” Monday, but he did attempt some outreach — with varying success.

“They may not agree with me, we may share different perspectives,” Jordan said, as a group of protesters laughed outside the Hayes Library. (“No, we don’t agree with you,” yelled one woman, interrupting Jordan.)

“But they’re allowed under the first amendment to speak up, and my job is to listen and tell them where I’m at,” Jordan said, which resulted in one man mocking him: “Listen and give the party line, no real reasons, no in-depth analysis.”

The sight of hundreds of protesters packed outside the Harding presidential home earlier in the day was compelling enough, Jordan said, for him to take questions from the angry crowd. But protesters claimed they had to force him to address them. As Harding Home director Sherry Hall attempted to read through a history of Harding from the wraparound porch, with Jordan by her side, angry protesters chanted at the “Stop Reading!” and yelled “Hold a town hall!” according to video of the event taken by one group of protesters. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell implored his Republican colleagues last week to face protesters and address them (even though he isn’t hosting any town halls himself — opting instead for a trio of closed-door fundraisers).

But the House of Representatives’ chief security officer urged House lawmakers to coordinate police protection for their public events while they were back in their home states. (A pair of Fremont police cars pulled up to Jordan’s second event, but the small number of police just watched while a few dozen protesters milled around outside.)

The showdowns are likely to be a common sight this week — with town halls in Arkansas, New Jersey and Florida acting like magnets for irate Democrats and even some independents who stayed out of politics until Trump took the White House.

Cheryl Laugherty, 62, a retired librarian from Fremont, Ohio, said she didn’t get active in protesting until Trump emerged as a force last year. Since his election, she’s been organizing with other women in northwest Ohio, and stood with a small group protesting Jordan in Fremont.

“It’s been off and on through the years, but his (Trump’s) behavior on the campaign trail this year just clinched it for me. I could not tolerate the way, like he made fun of the handicapped columnist, just things he said,” Laugherty said. “And it hasn’t changed, the belittling of people and the nicknames. It’s juvenile. It’s juvenile bullying.”

Jordan said Monday that it’s up to other Republicans to decide what they want to do, but suggested they honor the First Amendment and hear out the protesters. But Laugherty and others gathered outside the Hayes home Monday quickly pointed out that Jordan has yet to schedule any town halls himself.

Two D. Webster hoops players charged after fight at game

Posted: Feb. 19, 2017 8:00 am

NASHUA, N.H. (AP) Police have charged two members of the Daniel Webster men’s basketball team after a fight during a game that required 25 officers to restore order. Nashua authorities say guard Marquise Caudill assaulted a player from the opposing team Saturday and threatened an officer working a security detail who tried to stop him. They also said teammate Antwaun Boyd appeared to be inciting an already hostile crowd that had surrounded the officer. According to its website, Southern Vermont was playing Daniel Webster, which forfeited the game.

The 22-year-old Caudill, of Windsor, Connecticut, is being held on $50,000 cash bail on assault, criminal threatening and disorderly conduct charges. The 23-year-old Boyd, from Stamford, Connecticut, was charged with disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor, and released after bail was posted. It wasn’t immediately known if either is represented by a lawyer.

One other person, 43-year-old Elizabeth Morris of Malden, Massachusetts, also was charged in connection with the disturbance. She was released after bail was posted.

1 2 3 410