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Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees

A Senate panel on Thursday panned a proposal from the White House to cut funding for airport security programs and hike passenger security fees tacked onto airline tickets. In his fiscal 2018 budget request released this week, President Trump called for raising the Transportation Security Administration s (TSA) airline passenger security fee from $5.60 to $6.60 for each connecting flight. The administration said the dollar increase would generate an extra $530 million, which would be funneled toward beefing up aviation security.

But Sen. John BoozmanSenators Pan WH Proposal To Cut Airport Security Programs, Hike Ticket FeesJohn BoozmanSenators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees Congress should let local communities set their own PACE GOP senators on Comey firing: Where they stand MORE[2][3][4][5][6][1] (R-Ark.), chairman of the Appropriations subcommittee on homeland security, said at a hearing on Thursday that the idea fails to take into consideration many practical realities.

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The airlines have long urged lawmakers to avoid raising ticket fees, which they say would discourage travel and place an added burden on passengers.

Congress doubled the fee in 2014, and a portion of the revenue collected from the fee is diverted to other parts of the budget not related to airport security.

“There is no justification for asking airline customers to pay more, particularly while our government is diverting billions of dollars in security fees away from TSA checkpoints,” said Airlines for America, the leading trade group representing most of the nation s major airlines.

“Tax increases are not the answer, and will only serve to drive up the cost of flying for millions of Americans who rely on air travel, cost jobs, limit service options to small and medium communities and ultimately harm the U.S economy.”

Sen. Jon TesterSenators Pan WH Proposal To Cut Airport Security Programs, Hike Ticket FeesJon TesterSanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill Montana senator on Gianforte: Dealing with media part of the job Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees MORE[8][9][10][11][12][7] (D-Mont.), ranking member on the panel, took issue with Trump s spending blueprint for slashing a number of the TSA s airport security programs that were implemented in the wake of the 9/11 terrorists attacks.

“I am concerned about what is missing in this budget when it comes to other priorities, like aviation security,” Tester said. “The threat to aviation is very high we ve had classified briefings on this, in fact but we also see budget cuts to several TSA security programs.”

The budget would reduce the Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams from 31 to eight. These “VIPR” teams sweep transit hubs, often using bomb-sniffing dogs, and are designed to serve as a visible security presence around airports, train stations and ports. Lawmakers increased the number of VIPR teams in an aviation bill last year to enhance aviation security following the deadly bombing of an airport in Brussels. But the Trump administration has said the program “achieves few Federal law enforcement priorities.”

The proposal would also reduce TSA staff at airport exit lanes by 1,794 officers. The exit lanes don t have screening checkpoints but have officers present to ensure that people don t walk into the gate areas.

And a TSA grant program that provides money for state and local law enforcement to patrol airports would be completely eliminated under the White House budget, saving around $45 million.

“I m very concerned,” said Sen. Jeanne ShaheenSenators Pan WH Proposal To Cut Airport Security Programs, Hike Ticket FeesJeanne ShaheenSenators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees Dem senator: ‘One of our closest allies’ expressed concern about intelligence sharing Sessions postpones Senate testimony on DOJ funding MORE[14][15][16][17][18][13] (D-N.H.). “I was governor on 9/11, and I can tell you that the support we got from the federal government to help us to be better prepared to fight terrorist attacks was absolutely significant, and we could not have replaced that in another way.”

References

  1. ^ John Boozman (thehill.com)
  2. ^ John Boozman (thehill.com)
  3. ^ Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees (thehill.com)
  4. ^ Congress should let local communities set their own PACE (thehill.com)
  5. ^ GOP senators on Comey firing: Where they stand (thehill.com)
  6. ^ MORE (thehill.com)
  7. ^ Jon Tester (thehill.com)
  8. ^ Jon Tester (thehill.com)
  9. ^ Sanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill (thehill.com)
  10. ^ Montana senator on Gianforte: Dealing with media part of the job (thehill.com)
  11. ^ Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees (thehill.com)
  12. ^ MORE (thehill.com)
  13. ^ Jeanne Shaheen (thehill.com)
  14. ^ Jeanne Shaheen (thehill.com)
  15. ^ Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees (thehill.com)
  16. ^ Dem senator: ‘One of our closest allies’ expressed concern about intelligence sharing (thehill.com)
  17. ^ Sessions postpones Senate testimony on DOJ funding (thehill.com)
  18. ^ MORE (thehill.com)

Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike …

A Senate panel on Thursday panned a proposal from the White House to cut funding for airport security programs and hike passenger security fees tacked onto airline tickets. In his fiscal 2018 budget request released this week, President Trump called for raising the Transportation Security Administration s (TSA) airline passenger security fee from $5.60 to $6.60 for each connecting flight. The administration said the dollar increase would generate an extra $530 million, which would be funneled toward beefing up aviation security.

But Sen. John BoozmanSenators Pan WH Proposal To Cut Airport Security Programs, Hike ...John BoozmanSenators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees Congress should let local communities set their own PACE GOP senators on Comey firing: Where they stand MORE[2][3][4][5][6][1] (R-Ark.), chairman of the Appropriations subcommittee on homeland security, said at a hearing on Thursday that the idea fails to take into consideration many practical realities.

ADVERTISEMENT

The airlines have long urged lawmakers to avoid raising ticket fees, which they say would discourage travel and place an added burden on passengers.

Congress doubled the fee in 2014, and a portion of the revenue collected from the fee is diverted to other parts of the budget not related to airport security.

“There is no justification for asking airline customers to pay more, particularly while our government is diverting billions of dollars in security fees away from TSA checkpoints,” said Airlines for America, the leading trade group representing most of the nation s major airlines.

“Tax increases are not the answer, and will only serve to drive up the cost of flying for millions of Americans who rely on air travel, cost jobs, limit service options to small and medium communities and ultimately harm the U.S economy.”

Sen. Jon TesterSenators Pan WH Proposal To Cut Airport Security Programs, Hike ...Jon TesterSanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill Montana senator on Gianforte: Dealing with media part of the job Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees MORE[8][9][10][11][12][7] (D-Mont.), ranking member on the panel, took issue with Trump s spending blueprint for slashing a number of the TSA s airport security programs that were implemented in the wake of the 9/11 terrorists attacks.

“I am concerned about what is missing in this budget when it comes to other priorities, like aviation security,” Tester said. “The threat to aviation is very high we ve had classified briefings on this, in fact but we also see budget cuts to several TSA security programs.”

The budget would reduce the Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams from 31 to eight. These “VIPR” teams sweep transit hubs, often using bomb-sniffing dogs, and are designed to serve as a visible security presence around airports, train stations and ports. Lawmakers increased the number of VIPR teams in an aviation bill last year to enhance aviation security following the deadly bombing of an airport in Brussels. But the Trump administration has said the program “achieves few Federal law enforcement priorities.”

The proposal would also reduce TSA staff at airport exit lanes by 1,794 officers. The exit lanes don t have screening checkpoints but have officers present to ensure that people don t walk into the gate areas.

And a TSA grant program that provides money for state and local law enforcement to patrol airports would be completely eliminated under the White House budget, saving around $45 million.

“I m very concerned,” said Sen. Jeanne ShaheenSenators Pan WH Proposal To Cut Airport Security Programs, Hike ...Jeanne ShaheenSenate panel approves Scott Brown as NZ ambassador Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees Dem senator: ‘One of our closest allies’ expressed concern about intelligence sharing MORE[14][15][16][17][18][13] (D-N.H.). “I was governor on 9/11, and I can tell you that the support we got from the federal government to help us to be better prepared to fight terrorist attacks was absolutely significant, and we could not have replaced that in another way.”

References

  1. ^ John Boozman (thehill.com)
  2. ^ John Boozman (thehill.com)
  3. ^ Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees (thehill.com)
  4. ^ Congress should let local communities set their own PACE (thehill.com)
  5. ^ GOP senators on Comey firing: Where they stand (thehill.com)
  6. ^ MORE (thehill.com)
  7. ^ Jon Tester (thehill.com)
  8. ^ Jon Tester (thehill.com)
  9. ^ Sanders, Democrats introduce minimum wage bill (thehill.com)
  10. ^ Montana senator on Gianforte: Dealing with media part of the job (thehill.com)
  11. ^ Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees (thehill.com)
  12. ^ MORE (thehill.com)
  13. ^ Jeanne Shaheen (thehill.com)
  14. ^ Jeanne Shaheen (thehill.com)
  15. ^ Senate panel approves Scott Brown as NZ ambassador (thehill.com)
  16. ^ Senators pan WH proposal to cut airport security programs, hike ticket fees (thehill.com)
  17. ^ Dem senator: ‘One of our closest allies’ expressed concern about intelligence sharing (thehill.com)
  18. ^ MORE (thehill.com)

Two days, three attacks in downtown Indy garages

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INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. Some women living and working downtown are on alert after three attacks in parking garages this week. Monday and Tuesday, a total of three women reported three different downtown Indianapolis assaults, including two for sexual battery. Two attacks, reported as battery and sexual battery, were reported at a garage at East St. and Market St. on Monday morning.

In the second case, the woman had to be taken to the hospital for treatment. Police believe both are connected. Then another report of sexual battery came from a garage at Michigan and Delaware on Tuesday. The garage manager, concerned that woman was robbed and almost raped , sent an email to company and city officials urging them to hire a security guard.

But IMPD survival tactics trainer Officer Patterson notes security can t be everywhere at all times.

Put your cell phone away, said Patterson. Pay attention to your surroundings. Look back every 10 or 15 steps if you re by yourself, just a casual look back every once in a while. Patterson says some people are too worried about being polite. They avoid reporting suspicious people out of fear of offending, possibly putting themselves in danger.

Even if they don t mean you any harm, at least get them checked out, said Patterson. My question is why are you hanging out in a garage? If you re not going to your car, what s the purpose? Besides being prepared with a self-defense plan, Patterson s most important piece of advice is to listen to your gut.

Typically, if the hair on the back of your neck stands up, said Patterson. If something tells you, Hey something isn t right, listen to that!

The company that runs this garage is working to get additional security for the garage.

And if you want to learn self-defense, IMPD s downtown district is offering free classes, you just have to give them a call.

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