News by Professionals 4 Professionals

sports

Coast Guard vital for coastal trade, maritime security: Railway minister Suresh Prabhu

PANAJI: Union minister for railways Suresh Prabhu[1] on Tuesday asserted that in the next 10-15 years, India would be one of the top three economic powers in the world but for India to achieve that goal, a multi-modal coastal transport remained a vital cog. Speaking while commissioning Indian Coast Guard[2] ship Shaunak[3] at Goa Shipyard Limited[4], Prabhu[5] said that coastal security was key to India’s security and economic prosperity.

“I believe that in the days to come, based on the way our economy is growing currently, in 10-15 years, India will be the second or third largest economy in the world. Trade has always been an important factor for the economic development and international trade will be equally important,” Prabhu said while interacting with the media.

Most of India’s import and export trade passes through the country’s major shipping ports along the country’s eastern and western coast. “If you see, quite a large part of the rail network runs along the coast and in a way, the coast guard[6] helps protect this rail network. Multi-modal transportation is going to be an important thing… Rail infrastructure is susceptible and the Coast Guard helps in its protection,” Prabhu said. Stay updated on the go with Times of India News[7] App. Click here[8] to download it for your device.

References

  1. ^ Suresh Prabhu (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  2. ^ Indian Coast Guard (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  3. ^ Shaunak (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  4. ^ Goa Shipyard Limited (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  5. ^ Prabhu (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  6. ^ coast guard (timesofindia.indiatimes.com)
  7. ^ News (play.google.com)
  8. ^ here (get.timesofindia.com)

CSC Closes the Gap Between Security and IT Operations with …

TYSONS, Va.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–

CSC[1] (CSC[2]), a global leader in next-generation IT services and solutions, today announced an offering that integrates its security operations, threat intelligence, incident and vulnerability services with ServiceNow Security Operations on a single platform.

CSC s Integrated Security Operations (ISecOps[3]) offering helps clients deliver efficient security incident management, streamline remediation and clearly visualize their security state by extending the cloud-based IT service management capabilities of ServiceNow to security teams. The ISecOps platform combines CSC s cybersecurity operational processes, specialized consulting and advanced workflows with ServiceNow to automate manual processes and prioritize threats, incidents and vulnerabilities based on their potential business impact.

Incorporating ServiceNow Security Operations will bring enhanced integration, orchestration and automation to CSC s Managed Security Services platform, said Christina Richmond[4], IDC, program director, Worldwide Security Services. This offering will create smoother coordination between a company s SOC analysts, threat research teams and incident responders, and may shorten time to detection helping to break the kill chain earlier.

This offering will also help the managed security service provider (MSSP) to collect and correlate more forms of data and to identify threat patterns more rapidly. In today s complex environment, it is critical to provide the level-one triage team both at the client and within the service provider a playbook of step-by-step activities to guide them in combatting each event and incident in order to thwart a costly breach. Automation and orchestration is a key element in today s more mature MSSP, which, according to IDC s evaluation, CSC certainly is.

In the battle for cyber security, companies have a new weapon — a structured response engine, said Sean Convery, general manager of Security, ServiceNow. By replacing the manual work patterns of the past with intelligent workflows of the future, CSC and ServiceNow are helping customers resolve threats based on the impact they pose to the organization.

IDC believes the security as-a-service (SaaS) model is going to be an increasingly critical option for enterprises to source their security needs, according to the IDC MarketScape: Asia/Pacific Managed Security Services 2016 Vendor Assessment[5]. The report named CSC as a MSS leader for the second time.

Cybersecurity challenges extend beyond the traditional techniques of protecting the perimeter, patching end-points and monitoring for event based alerts across the enterprise, Dan Hushon[6], CTO, vice president & general manager, Cybersecurity, CSC. Today s information security programs must evolve to become integrated across the IT landscape, intelligence-driven by analytics, context aware and automated.

CSC s internal IT department is driven by the same security challenges and threat landscape as its clients. ISecOps enables CSC s incident response team to create visualizations of incident data, indicators of compromise and threat intelligence to better detect security breaches and manage incidents and vulnerabilities.

Clients in a wide range of sectors from financial services to insurance, healthcare and manufacturing can benefit from closing the remediation gap between security and IT operations in resolving critical threats with ISecOps:

  • Reduce risk exposure, increase efficiency and enhance visibility;
  • Identify risks faster and accelerate incident management;
  • Streamline security and IT processes and improve collaboration cross the enterprise;
  • View security posture with an integrated dashboard; and
  • Leverage CSC Security Operations with global 24×7 support.

By combining CSC s Managed Security Services[7] and Fruition Partners[8] ServiceNow implementation expertise and ServiceNow technology, CSC is uniquely positioned to provide clients with a complete security operations portfolio addressing their consulting, integration and managed services needs delivered through ISecOps.

CSC will showcase ISecOps at the 2017 HIMSS Annual Conference & Exhibition in Booth 2773.

IDC MarketScape: Asia/Pacific Managed Security Services 2016 Vendor Assessment (doc# AP40939616, October 2016).

About CSC

CSC (CSC[9]) leads clients on their digital transformation journeys. The company provides innovative next-generation technology services and solutions that leverage deep industry expertise, global scale, technology independence and an extensive partner community. CSC serves leading commercial and international public sector organizations throughout the world. CSC is a Fortune 500 company and ranked among the best corporate citizens. For more information, visit the company s website[10] to learn more about how Integrated Digital Service Management (IDSM[11]) and the modern agile hybrid cloud platform[12] empowers IT departments in today s digital enterprise.

View source version on businesswire.com: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170221005600/en/[13]

References

  1. ^ CSC (cts.businesswire.com)
  2. ^ CSC (finance.yahoo.com)
  3. ^ ISecOps (cts.businesswire.com)
  4. ^ Richmond (cts.businesswire.com)
  5. ^ Asia/Pacific Managed Security Services 2016 Vendor Assessment (cts.businesswire.com)
  6. ^ Hushon (cts.businesswire.com)
  7. ^ Managed Security Services (cts.businesswire.com)
  8. ^ Fruition Partners (cts.businesswire.com)
  9. ^ CSC (finance.yahoo.com)
  10. ^ website (cts.businesswire.com)
  11. ^ (IDSM (cts.businesswire.com)
  12. ^ modern agile hybrid cloud platform (cts.businesswire.com)
  13. ^ http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20170221005600/en/ (www.businesswire.com)

R.I. judiciary reviews policy barring deputy sheriffs from carrying …

Most court security staff nationwide are armed with guns, but in Rhode Island, deputy sheriffs are barred from carrying guns inside state courthouses.

Katie Mulvaney Journal Staff Writer kmulvane

PROVIDENCE, R.I. After two Superior Court appearances were quickly followed by shootings, discussions are afoot in the state judiciary about changing the policy that bars deputy sheriffs from carrying guns. One of the episodes ended in a 22-year-old man’s murder at the Chad Brown housing complex minutes after he attended an arraignment. The other resulted in a brazen midday shooting in downtown Providence, just a block from the courthouse, leaving a Pawtucket man seriously injured and courthouse staff shaken. The incidents have sparked renewed discussion about the courts’ gun policy.

“It’s something we talk about with the judiciary. … We want to be proactive,” said state police Lt. Col. Kevin M. Barry, commanding officer of the Department of Public Safety, which oversees the Division of Sheriffs and the Capitol Police.

The issue is under review by state Supreme Court Chief Justice Paul A. Suttell and the other state court chiefs following a recent meeting with state police Col. Ann Assumpico, Barry, and the Rhode Island Police Chiefs Association board, Supreme Court administrator J. Joseph Baxter Jr. said last week. Baxter emphasized that the violence did not occur inside a courthouse.

“At no instance has it been a breach of courthouse security,” he said. “Our main objective is to be able to maintain a safe venue for people to have their disputes heard. Obviously, the sheriffs and the Capitol Police are an integral part.”

“We’re of a similar mindset. It’s worthy of discussion,” Barry said of the police chiefs’ association, whose leadership declined comment. Sheriffs provide courtroom security, transport defendants to and from prison, and stand watch over juries. As things stand, deputies’ guns are secured in strategic locations in courthouses for retrieval if needed.

Barry noted concerns about suspects potentially seizing weapons from sheriffs, but said holster improvements now make it difficult for a weapon to be removed. Even so, Baxter wondered: “By allowing weapons in, would they get in the hands of the wrong person?”

The no-weapons policy has been in place since 2003, when then Supreme Court Chief Justice Frank J. William issued an executive order barring anyone, other than the Capitol Police, from carrying any weapons in courthouses. The order came after a security review of state courts by the U.S. Marshals Service. Before that, police could carry guns in the courts, and each high sheriff set a different weapons policy for that county s courthouse, according to Craig Berke, courts spokesman.

Capitol Police, who carry guns, screen all visitors before they enter courthouses. Staff and lawyers swipe in via a card key, but are not screened. Law enforcement officers sign in and check their guns. Since 2015, some deputy sheriffs have carried Tasers in addition to batons, pepper spray and handcuffs. The Tasers deliver a jolt of electricity that incapacitates by disrupting muscle control. Sixty-four sheriffs now carry Tasers, adding a layer of protection, Baxter said. Perimeter security remains a concern, Baxter said, as cuts in the ranks of sheriffs over the past few years have “decimated” the division’s ability to extend coverage beyond the courthouses. Currently, there are 179 deputy sheriffs, with 17 added last fall from the latest graduating training-academy class.

“It all goes back to manpower,” Baxter said. “They do a fine job. There aren’t enough of them.”

Due to the shortage, the judiciary has suspended school tours and occasionally has to close courtrooms, he said. In the meantime, state police plan to work with the Providence Police Department to boost security outside the courthouses, particularly during known gang trials or court appearances by gang associates, Barry said. “We’re going to put some more presence outside.”

An analyst with the National Center for State Courts said Rhode Island is unique among the states in that the judiciary has broad power to determine what weapons law enforcement personnel can carry in the courts. Most court security staff nationwide are armed with guns, as dictated by state laws. By the numbers

Sheriffs Division Budget 2017: $18.2 million

Sheriffs: 179

Sheriffs carrying Tasers: 64

Sources: Rhode Island state budget; Supreme Court administrator J. Joseph Baxter Jr.

[email protected]

(401) 277-7417

On Twitter: @kmulvane