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Driver dies in Piti auto crash

CLOSEDriver Dies In Piti Auto Crash Driver Dies In Piti Auto Crash

Guam Highway Patrol officers close off Marine Corps Drive in Piti to investigate a crash Saturday morning. John I. Borja and Masako Watanabe/PDN

Driver Dies In Piti Auto Crash

Guam Police Department Highway Patrol Division Officer James Muna marks the spot where a red Acura came to rest after a crash off of Route 1 in Piti early morning on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. (Photo: Masako Watanabe/PDN)

The male driver of a red 2003 Acura died after an early morning crash on Route 1 in Piti Saturday. The vehicle crashed off the road around 3:24 a.m., and the driver was pronounced dead at Naval Hospital Guam at 3:55 a.m., said Capt. Kim Santos, Guam Police Department spokeswoman. The single-car crash took place just north of the intersection with Route 11, the road leading to the Commercial Port.

Witness: Car went airborne

At the scene, the mangled Acura RSX, also known as the Integra in Japan, lay on its side, just off the northbound lane. G4S security guard Jesse Abian on his first night on the job at the GTA property nearby, said he heard the sound of a skidding car approaching from the south, and looked up in time to see the northbound car pass him, strike a GTA building and flip. The car hit a concrete block off the sidewalk, went airborne and bounced off the building’s wall, he said. The car came to rest about 200 feet away from where Abian was, he said. The guard ran to the car and found a man hanging upside down from the vehicle’s frame. He said he tried to talk to the driver, who was unresponsive but still breathing.

“I was trying to talk to him but he didn’t respond,” Abian said. “I saw a lot of blood there.” The driver appeared to have been wearing a seatbelt, the guard said. Parts from the car, including the engine, were found as far as 150 feet away from the car’s final resting spot. The security guard said that the man was the sole occupant of the vehicle.

“I was just freaking out myself. It’s the first time I saw something like this.”

Abian said he was sitting in his parked vehicle, keeping an eye on the GTA facility. Had he parked where he originally planned, he would have been in the direct path of the crashing Acura.

“Something told me not to park there,” he said.

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Tire marks were visible on the roadway stretching several hundred feet, starting around the traffic light to the Commercial Port road. The marks crossed into the median and curved right. Highway Patrol Division officers marked the scene and took measurements. The vehicle hit the GTA Piti cable landing station, an ongoing project, according to a posted sign. Heavy equipment and construction markers surrounded a taller building behind the one-story structure the vehicle struck. GTA Security Specialist Raynaldo Tanayan said project was slated for completion this month. The road was closed for several hours while police conducted the on-site investigation.

As of Saturday afternoon, GPD did not identify the driver pending notification of kin.

Editor’s note: This is a breaking news story. The Pacific Daily News will update the story as more information becomes available.

Other auto-related fatalities this year:

3-year-old struck by vehicle, dies of injuries, says GPD

58-year-old struck by car, dies

Worker in manhole dies after crash in Tamuning

Talofofo man suffers heart attack while driving, dies

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References

  1. ^

Crashes closes Rt. 1 in Piti

CLOSECrashes Closes Rt. 1 In Piti Crashes Closes Rt. 1 In Piti

Guam Highway Patrol officers close off Marine Corps Drive in Piti to investigate a crash Saturday morning. John I. Borja and Masako Watanabe/PDN

Crashes Closes Rt. 1 In Piti

Guam Police Department Highway Patrol Division Officer James Muna marks the spot where a red Acura came to rest after a crash off of Route 1 in Piti early morning on Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017. (Photo: Masako Watanabe/PDN)

The male driver of a red 2003 Acura died after an early morning crash on Route 1 in Piti Saturday. The vehicle crashed off the road around 3:24 a.m., and the driver was pronounced dead at Naval Hospital Guam at 3:55 a.m., said Capt. Kim Santos, Guam Police Department spokeswoman. The single-car crash took place just north of the intersection with Route 11, the road leading to the Commercial Port.

Witness: Car went airborne

At the scene, the mangled Acura RSX, also known as the Integra in Japan, lay on its side, just off the northbound lane. G4S security guard Jesse Abian on his first night on the job at the GTA property nearby, said he heard the sound of a skidding car approaching from the south, and looked up in time to see the northbound car pass him, strike a GTA building and flip. The car hit a concrete block off the sidewalk, went airborne and bounced off the building’s wall, he said. The car came to rest about 200 feet away from where Abian was, he said. The guard ran to the car and found a man hanging upside down from the vehicle’s frame. He said he tried to talk to the driver, who was unresponsive but still breathing.

“I was trying to talk to him but he didn’t respond,” Abian said. “I saw a lot of blood there.” The driver appeared to have been wearing a seatbelt, the guard said. NParts from the car, including the engine, were found as far as 150 away from the car’s final resting spot. The security guard said that the man was the sole occupant of the vehicle.

“I was just freaking out myself. It’s the first time I saw something like this.”

Abian said he was sitting in his parked vehicle, keeping an eye on the GTA facility. Had he parked where he originally planned, he would have been in the direct path of the crashing Acura.

“Something told me not to park there,” he said.

Show Thumbnails Show Captions

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References

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SD troopers spent thousands of hours at pipeline protests

SD Troopers Spent Thousands Of Hours At Pipeline Protests

An unidentified Dakota Access Pipeline protester is arrested inside the Front Line Camp as law enforcement surround the camp to remove the protesters from the property and relocated to the overflow camp a few miles south of Highway 1806 in Morton County, N.D., Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)(Photo: Mike McCleary, AP)

South Dakota is still owed hundreds of thousands of dollars for assisting North Dakota law enforcement during pipeline protests, and the bill keeps getting bigger. South Dakota s state troopers have gone to North Dakota four times to assist in the policing of opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline near Cannonball. Troopers are in Morton County, N.D., now for their second rotation of 2017. So far, South Dakota has been repaid $83,653 of the $303,242 it is owed for the first two deployments in October and November. The bill represents 6,392 man hours for state troopers, according to Department of Public Safety spokesman Tony Mangan.

Payments are trickling in as North Dakota lawmakers debate funding for the ongoing operations and lawmakers in both Dakotas debate how to handle future protests. Legislators in both states have proposed penalties for protesters[1] during their respective legislative sessions. Cost has been a major issue for North Dakota officials during the months-long uprising.

More News: Trump weighs mobilizing National Guard for immigration roundups[2]

The most recent figures posted by the Morton County Sheriff s Office put the cost to state and local agencies at $32.9 million. South Dakota is one of nine states to offer assistance to Bismarck-area law enforcement since protests ramped up[3] last August. Each South Dakota Highway Patrol deployment came after a request through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact or EMAC, which allows agencies to call in assistance from other states when needed.

States who invoke EMAC are expected to pay back the assisting states after the work is performed. The department is not concerned about the time frame of the payment, Mangan said. The cost of the current deployments, which began on Jan. 27, has yet to be calculated.

We submit it to North Dakota, and they deal with it, Mangan said. It takes us some time to get all the expenses totaled up and sent to them.

Watch: A closer look at the pipeline protests

CLOSESD Troopers Spent Thousands Of Hours At Pipeline Protests SD Troopers Spent Thousands Of Hours At Pipeline Protests

Oceti Sakowin camp in N.D. is the largest of three set up in opposition to the DAPL. The campers are concerned about the pipeline, but a history of tribal land losses and worries about climate change have helped turn the opposition into a movement. South Dakota does not release the number of troopers sent for security reasons.

The appearance of South Dakota troopers at the protest sites is not meant as a signal of support of the pipeline, he said. If a participating state has the ability to assist an EMAC member after an emergency is declared, there s an expectation of mutual aid, he said.

That s part of the agreement you go if you re able, Mangan said. You don t have to say yes, but most states do.”

Thousands of people traveled to the site of North Dakota encampments to express opposition to the four-state pipeline in late summer and early fall, sparking an emergency declaration from then-Governor Jack Dalrymlple.

Related: How did Dakota Access become world’s largest pipeline protest?[4]

Law enforcement from 33 out-of-state agencies traveled there to help contain protests, but the deployments were controversial. Pipeline opponents decried the law enforcement responses as aggressive violations of civil rights. The Hennepin County Sheriff s Department saw hundreds of protesters converge on its Minneapolis headquarters in October, for example, and lawmakers criticized Sheriff Rich Stanek that EMAC protocols don t require him to send deputies unless there s a natural disaster.

The Crow Creek Sioux Tribal Council in South Dakota voted to cut ties[5] with South Dakota law enforcement and rescind a tax agreement last fall in response to the highway patrol s cooperation with Morton County, N.D. The camps thinned considerably as winter set in. The Obama Administration blocked the final easement for the nearly-completed pipeline in December, but President Donald Trump has since issued executive orders clearing the way for the completion of drilling beneath Lake Oahe. The current deployment requests came shortly after President Donald Trump issued an executive order meant to clear the way for construction of the stalled pipeline. The first group of troopers came home on Feb. 9, the day after a second deployment began.

The protests have prompted talk of emergency response plans in South Dakota. Gov. Dennis Daugaard is backing a bill that would criminalize the blocking of a highway and make it easier for out-of-state attorneys to represent activists in the event of similar events in the state.

Read or Share this story: http://argusne.ws/2lf1Op7

References

  1. ^ proposed penalties for protesters (www.argusleader.com)
  2. ^ Trump weighs mobilizing National Guard for immigration roundups (www.argusleader.com)
  3. ^ since protests ramped up (www.argusleader.com)
  4. ^ How did Dakota Access become world’s largest pipeline protest? (www.argusleader.com)
  5. ^ voted to cut ties (www.argusleader.com)
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