News by Professionals 4 Professionals

transportation

Airport security screeners catch one for the record books: A heavyweight lobster

.@TSA officers are skilled at screening all sorts of items in checked baggage including this 20+ pound lobster at @BostonLogan pic.twitter.com/euhyyO6F7V[1][2][3]

Michael McCarthy (@TSAmedia_MikeM) June 26, 2017[4]

What a catch! Airport screeners found they had to check out a 20-plus-pound lobster at Boston s Logan Airport. It was not immediately known if the passenger was allowed to keep the lobster found in the checked baggage.

Screeners for the Transportation Security Administration often deal with unique items, including weapons, that passengers try to bring aboard flights.

[TSA Instagram showcases the wacky and weird from airport checkpoints[5]]

In Februray, TSA screeners at Dulles International Airport had to deal with a bag full of horse meat and genitals that was hidden in juice boxes. Two women coming from Mongolia had the roughly 42 pounds of meat in bags. The meat was seized and destroyed.

References

  1. ^ @TSA (twitter.com)
  2. ^ @BostonLogan (twitter.com)
  3. ^ pic.twitter.com/euhyyO6F7V (t.co)
  4. ^ June 26, 2017 (twitter.com)
  5. ^ TSA Instagram showcases the wacky and weird from airport checkpoints (www.washingtonpost.com)

Latest deployments to Middle East a source of pride, worry for families

Latest Deployments To Middle East A Source Of Pride, Worry For Families

Gov. Chris Sununu talks with Master Sgt. T.J. Hackett, left, and his son, Senior Airman Travis Hackett, as the two prepare to deploy to the Middle East next month. (Courtesy of Staff Sgt. Curtis Lenz)

Latest Deployments To Middle East A Source Of Pride, Worry For Families An airman with the New Hampshire Air National Guard’s 157th Security Forces Squadron listens during a ceremony Sunday to honor him and 28 other airmen who will deploy to the Middle East next month. (Jason Schreiber)
NEWINGTON Master Sgt. T.J. Hackett of Durham hopes he has a chance to catch up with his son when both are deployed to the Middle East next month.

The 55-year-old Hackett is with the New Hampshire Air National Guard s 157th Security Forces Squadron; his son, Travis, 22, is deployed to the region as a senior airman with the 91st Missile Security Forces Squadron from Minot Air Force Base in North Dakota. The father and son were together Sunday for a ceremony recognizing the 29 airmen from the 157th Security Forces Squadron based at Pease Air National Guard Base as they prepare for the upcoming deployment, which will involve providing security at six air bases throughout the region. The younger Hackett said he learned that he would be heading out on a six-month deployment about two weeks after his dad found out that he would be deployed on the same day for the same length of time.

We ll probably see each other in transit when we re flying to whichever location he s going to or I m going to, Travis said.

The dual deployments won t be easy for Christine Hackett, a teacher at Oyster River Middle School who will be thinking of her husband and only child every day and hoping for their safe return.

I know that both of them have wanted to go. I know that it s something that they re very passionate about. I m very proud of them, but at the same time I think it s going to be a long six months, she said.

She s as much of a warrior as we are, said T. J. Hackett, a retired New Hampshire State Police trooper. The sacrifice made by the military families left at home was mentioned by several who spoke at Sunday s ceremony, including military leaders and Gov. Chris Sununu, U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Congressman Annie Kuster. The ceremony also celebrated the 281 airmen from the 157th Air Refueling Wing who have deployed this year.

When you think about it, most families in America are waking up and figuring out, Are we going to go to the lake? Are we going to go to the ocean? Are we going to have a barbecue today? Not many of them are saying goodbye to a loved one to go to war, said Major Gen. William Reddel III, adjutant general of the New Hampshire National Guard.

Reddel said it was important to hold the ceremony to remind people that the nation is still at war.

Aug. 2, 1990. That s when this unit started to go to war and we haven t stopped yet, he said, referring to U.S. military operations during the Gulf War and in Somalia, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq, and now the war on ISIS. Next month s deployment will be the fourth for some members of the unit.

Our nation has made extraordinary demands on you and your families, Shaheen said. Sgt. Andrew Ducharme, 23, of Weare, is one of the 29 airmen deploying next month. It will be his first deployment.

He said he s excited about the opportunity, but admitted that it will be difficult to be away from his family.

It will be a good experience and a good building block, he said. Ducharme was joined by his family, including his grandmother, Annette Ducharme, 75, of Amherst.

I m feeling sad, but I m proud of him and I m thankful that there are young men and women who are willing to sacrifice for us because that s why we have our freedom, she said. Technical Sgt. Jared McGouldrick, 35, of Belgrade, Maine, will leave behind his wife, Caitlin, and 3-year-old son, Colin.

I ve got a lot going on right now. I m trying to get everything buttoned up for my civilian job before I head out the door, he said.

His wife said their son is really too young to understand what s happening, but they had a pillow made with his dad s picture on it to remind Colin of his father.

We re just trying to talk to him about how daddy s going to leave and daddy s at work. It s going to be tough, but you ve gotta do what you ve gotta do, she said.

[email protected]

Airline worker accused of fighting at North Carolina airport

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) An indictment says an airline worker directed a racial slur at a security officer, threatened to kill him and got into a fight with police at a North Carolina airport. The Charlotte Observer reports an indictment unsealed in federal court in Charlotte on Friday said 30-year-old Jordan Lee Moore of Winston-Salem faces two counts of interference with security screening personnel. The indictment said Moore, who works for American Airlines, tried to go through a Transportation Security Administration checkpoint at Charlotte-Douglas International Airport on March 30 without a valid boarding pass. After that encounter, the indictment says Moore went to another checkpoint, where Charlotte-Mecklenburg police ordered him to leave the airport.

It took five officers to restrain Moore after they tried to arrest him when he attempted to enter another checkpoint.

Share this:

Related Posts

Advertisement

1 2 3 258