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Security services ‘have investigated 23000 people over terror fears’

As many as 23,000 people have appeared on the radar of counter-terror agencies, new figures laying bare the scale of the potential threat show. In the wake of the Manchester suicide bombing it emerged that British authorities were grappling with 500 investigations into 3,000 individuals. On Friday security sources confirmed a further 20,000 individuals were said to have been considered subjects of interest in the past, although the period the figures cover is unclear.

Anti-terror efforts came under fresh scrutiny following revelations that attacker Salman Abedi had been a former subject of interest to MI5 who was subject to review . This would suggest the mass murderer was not regarded as posing an imminent threat when he detonated his device at the Manchester Arena, killing 22. Security minister Ben Wallace told BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme: All those people are in the mix and they have to be looked at.

He added: All of that is predominately underpinned by intelligence, which as I’m sure you will understand and the courts certainly understand, unfortunately the hardest part is we’ve got to convert intelligence into evidence if we actually want to deprive people of their liberty or take certain steps.

Manchester explosion in pictures

A senior Whitehall source said on Thursday that 18 plots had been foiled since 2013 in Britain, including five since the Westminster atrocity in March this year. The figures disclosed on Friday give an indication of what the source described as the unprecedented size of the current terror picture in Britain. Round-the-clock monitoring of terror suspects is only possible in a handful of cases due to limited resources, the priority of which are determined on factors including credibility of intelligence and the apparent seriousness of the individual’s intent.

PA

Security Services 'have Investigated 23000 People Over Terror Fears'Reuse content[1]

References

  1. ^ Reuse content (www.independent.co.uk)

Memorial Day services in Kansas

WICHITA, Kan. – The following is a list of events across Kansas to mark Memorial Day:

Sunday:

Wichita

Veterans Memorial Park located at 339 Veterans Parkway, 3 p.m.

Monday:

Wichita

Greenwood Cemetery 11 a.m. Speaker: Pastor Byron Barrientez, Music: Carol McDonald & Brad Reed, Veterans of Foreign War, American Legion and the Tornado Alley Young Marines. Resthaven Cemetery 11 a.m. Speakers: Mayor Jeffl Longwell, Col. Bruce P. Heseltine, Jr. from McConnell AFB, Flyover by Jayhawk Wing of Commemorative Air Force.

Derby

El Paso Cemetery 9:30 a.m. Hillcrest Cemetery 11 a.m.

Mulvane

Mulvane Cemetery 9:15 a.m.

Around the state:

Assaria

Sgt. Maj. Steve Ahlstedt, operations sergeant major, 130th Field Artillery Brigade, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at the Assaria Lutheran Church, 124 W 1st St. The ceremony begins at 9:30 a.m.

Attica

1st Lt. Adam Beckman, executive officer, 1611st Forward Support Company, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at the Attica Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Clay Center

1st Sgt. James Peeler, 330th Brigade Signal Company, will be the emcee at a Memorial Day ceremony sponsored by American Legion Post 101 at the Greenwood Cemetery. Lt. Col. John Lemay, 1st Infantry Division, will be the guest speaker. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Clifton

Sgt. 1st Class Linnea Wright, brigade signal supervisor, 130th Field Artillery Brigade, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony in Clifton. The ceremony, sponsored by the Clifton American Legion Post, begins at 10 a.m. in Berner Memorial Park.

Garden Plain

Staff Sgt. Chris Rodriguez, 134th Air Control Squadron, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at St. Anthony Cemetery, 101 N Main. The ceremony will begin after a church service which starts at 9 a.m.

Hays

1st Sgt. Melissa Stupka, unit first sergeant, 1161st Forward Support Company, 997th Brigade Support Battalion, will be the guest speaker at the American Legion/VFW Memorial Day service at the VFW, 2106 Vine St. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Hesston

Soldiers from Battery C, 1st Battalion, 161st Field Artillery, will provide a color guard for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Hesston Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m.

Hiawatha

Capt. Matthew Nordquist, administration officer for the 2nd Battalion, 130th Field Artillery, will be the guest speaker for a Memorial Day ceremony sponsored by the American Legion Homer-White Post #66. The ceremony will be held at the Brown County Historical Society Veterans Memorial Auditorium, 611 Utah St., and will begin at 10 a.m.

Iuka

Soldiers from Detachment 1, 1161st Forward Support Company, will provide a color guard for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Iuka Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 11:15 a.m.

Kingman

Soldiers from the 330th Brigade Signal Company will provide a color guard for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Walnut Hill Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Leavenworth

The 35th Infantry Division Band will perform at a memorial service at the Leavenworth National Cemetery, 150 Muncie Rd. The ceremony begins at 9 am.

Lindsborg

Sgt. Maj. Steve Ahlstedt, operations sergeant major, 130th Field Artillery Brigade, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at the Salemsborg Lutheran Church, 3831 W Salemsborg Rd. The ceremony begins at 8:30 a.m. Sgt. Maj. Steve Ahlstedt, operations sergeant major, 130th Field Artillery Brigade, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at the Elmwood Cemetery, 1571 E. Swensson Ave. The ceremony begins at 10:30 a.m.

Marysville

Sgt. 1st Class Michael Maschmeier and Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Metz, 2nd Battalion, 130th Field Artillery, will be placing a flag and flowers on the grave of the Unknown Soldier during a Memorial Day ceremony at the Marysville Cemetery, 1401 N 18th. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m.

Natrona

Soldiers from Detachment 1, 1161st Forward Support Company, will provide a color guard for Memorial Day ceremony at Natrona Cemetery. The ceremony starts at 9:30 a.m.

Newton

Soldiers from Battery C, 1st Battalion, 161st Field Artillery will provide a color guard for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Newton Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 9:15 a.m.

Norton

Col. Dave Johnson, commander, 69th Troop Command, will be the guest speaker at the Memorial Day Observance at the Norton Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m.

Osborne

Maj. Daniel Mehlhaff, executive officer, 997th Brigade Support Battalion, will be the guest speaker at the American Legion/VFW Memorial Day ceremony at the Osborne Catholic Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m. Another ceremony will follow at the Osborne Cemetery at 10 a.m.

Otis

Soldiers from the 731st Transportation Company will provide a firing detail for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Trinity Lutheran Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Phillipsburg

Staff Sgt. Andrew Hughes, training noncommissioned officer, Detachment 1, 995th Maintenance Company, will be the guest speaker for a Memorial Day ceremony at the Fairview Cemetery, Hwy 183 and Park St., Phillipsburg. The ceremony begins at 10:30 a.m. Another ceremony will be held at the Glade Cemetery immediately following.

Pittsburg

Members of the Kansas National Guard will participating in the reading of 58,288 names inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall as part of the Pittsburg State University s Memorial Day Observance. The ceremony begins at 10:30 a.m.

Pratt

Soldiers from Detachment 1, 1161st Forward Support Company, will provide a color guard for a Memorial Day ceremony at Greenlawn Cemetery. The ceremony starts at 10:30 a.m. Lt. Col. Adam Krein, deputy Human Resources officer, Kansas National Guard, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at the Pratt Municipal Airport B-29 All Vets Memorial, 40096 Runway Blvd. The ceremony begins at 2 p.m. Soldiers from Detachment 1, 1161st Forward Support Company, will provide the color guard for this event.

Preston

Soldiers from Detachment 1, 1161st Forward Support Company, will provide a color guard for Memorial Day ceremony at the Pleasant Valley Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 9 a.m.

Topeka

Lt. Col. Molly Gillock, environmental officer, Kansas Army National Guard, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at Penwell-Gabel Cemetery, 6th & Gage. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m. Lt. Col. Shy Warner, administrative officer, 1st Battalion, 235th Regiment, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at Mount Hope Cemetery, 17th & Fairlawn. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m. Sgt. 1st Class Craig Jackson and Staff Sgt. Cory Russell, Kansas Army National Guard, and Master Sgt. Daniel Berends and Senior Airman Denise Garcia, Kansas Air National Guard, will be providing a joint color guard at the annual Massing of the Colors at the Great Overland Station, 701 N Kansas Ave. The ceremony begins at 2 p.m. A free BBQ luncheon is provided prior to the ceremony at 12:30 p.m. for military veterans and their families.

Toronto

Col. Robert Duke, Kansas National Guard, will be the guest speaker at the Memorial Day Observation hosted by American Legion Post 325 at the Toronto Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 11 a.m.

Wamego

Lt. Col. Erica Christie, commander, 997th Brigade Support Battalion, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony hosted by American Legion Post 172 at the Wamego Cemetery. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Wilson

1st Lt. Brandon Devader, Senior Master Sgt. Chris Platzer, Master Sgt. Kenny Everett, Tech. Sgt. Sheldon Dillinger, Tech. Sgt. Steven Parker, Tech. Sgt Chris Barth, Tech. Sgt. Dustin Roberts, 184th Intelligence Wing, and Master Sgt. Tyrel Askren, 931st Security Forces Squadron, will be participating in a Memorial Day ceremony at the Wilson Cemetery. They will serve as the rifle detail and honor guard party marching through town to a wreath-laying ceremony at the Memorial site, followed by a march through the cemetery to the Veterans Memorial to conduct a 21-gun salute and read the names of the fallen. The ceremony beings at 10 a.m.

Windom

Staff Sgt. Jason Beaver, ordnance instructor, Regional Training Site-Maintenance, will be the guest speaker at a Memorial Day ceremony at the Andover Lutheran Church, 117 Dakota Road. The ceremony begins at 10 a.m.

Matthew Fisher: Trump didn’t scold Trudeau by name, but his point was clear

BRUSSELS U.S. President Donald Trump opened the NATO summit Thursday by blasting 23 of the alliance s 28 member states Canada almost certainly among them for not spending nearly enough on collective security. As other leaders, including Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, stood nervously to the side like wayward schoolboys hoping not to be personally named and shamed, Trump used his brief speech at the opening of the western military alliance s space station-like new U.S. $1.2-billion headquarters in the Belgian capital to denounce almost all of those around him for not meeting their obligations. Such behaviour was not fair to the people of the United States, he said. Trump s criticisms of his fellow leaders on Thursday were identical to those heard from his predecessor, Barack Obama, when he addressed the Canadian parliament last year. But the message has never before been delivered so directly and with such public force as it was by Trump. Adding to the drama, the backdrop for Trump s speech was a shard of steel from the 9/11 attacks on the Twin Towers, which is to be part of a memorial at the new NATO building.

Despite anxiety in European capitals about Trump s propensity for saying unflattering and provocative things about allies, he received a warm welcome from his partners and relatively uncritical reportage about his visit. In going live with his arrival on Wednesday, Belgian television solemnly followed Air Force One from when it was a speck in the sky until it rolled to a stop on the tarmac while other media across the continent breathlessly reported everything he was doing. Forgotten for the moment were Trump s remarks last year that NATO was obsolete. Without a doubt, Canada was one of the defence-spending laggards to which Trump referred. According to a recent table published by The Economist, by the measure of defence spending as a percentage of GDP Canada swims almost at the bottom of the alliance s pool with such minnows as Luxembourg. Many NATO countries, most notably Germany, have increased defence spending this year. Canada is until now the sole outlier, having deferred billions of dollars of defence spending in this year s federal budget.

On Thursday in Brussels Trudeau dodged questions when asked about demands by Trump and NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg to honour the pledge, reaffirmed three years ago by every member of the military alliance, to gradually increase each country s defence spending to at least 2 per cent of GDP. Depending on which figures are to be believed, Canada now spends between .88 per cent and .98 of GDP per year on defence. But Trudeau and Defence minister Harjit Sajjan repeated vague promises that the long-awaited Defence Policy Review will call for some additional spending when it is finally published on June 7. A NATO official familiar with the issue said the alliance was privately deeply frustrated at Canada s unwillingness to meet its obligations but that it would be undiplomatic for anyone in Brussels to publicly call Ottawa out over it. Expressing satisfaction with Trump s pointed remarks on spending, the official said they hoped the U.S. and key European countries such as Germany would press Canada to do more.

The Liberal government has tried recently to change the discussion on defence spending by highlighting what the government believes is the quality of its contributions to NATO missions. The prime minister has often boasted about what Canada did in Afghanistan although Canada was one of the first countries to bring its combat troops home from there and that was now six years ago. The government has also made a lot of Canada being one of four lead nations establishing combat task forces in the Baltics to act as a tripwire against Russian aggression. But Canada s contribution to an an enhanced security presence in Latvia is far smaller than those made by the other lead nations, including only a couple hundred combat troops. Another argument that Canada has made in recent months is that spending on the military should be lumped in with what is spent on international humanitarian aid, border guards and the coast guard. A few other countries already try do this in different ways, but there are some telling differences.

Unlike the Canadian Coast Guard, for example, the U.S. Coast Guard is an armed force that has been used in the Persian Gulf and board ships suspected of smuggling drugs or terrorists. It is the Royal Canadian Navy, rather than the coast guard, that conducts such searches for Canada. Even if Canada were to count all of those additional costs alongside its core defence spending, it would still fall far short of the 2-per-cent target. In another move Thursday that will be unlikely to curry favour in Washington, Trudeau rejected an urgent request from Trump and Stoltenberg to provide more military trainers and surveillance aircraft for the war on terror in Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan.

In fact, the prime minister confirmed Thursday that Canada has quietly shrunk its already small part in the war against the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant. It recently cut in half its aerial-reconnaissance capability in Iraq by bringing home one of the two Kuwait-based CP-140 Aurora spy planes that the U.S.-led coalition had been using to target ISIL. This followed last year s withdrawal of CF-18 fighter jets from bombing missions against ISIL in Iraq and Syria. Withdrawing the Aurora aircraft was simply part of a regular rotation that was routine, the prime minister said during a 30-minute news conference. There was nothing surprising or sudden about this. Trudeau did not elaborate on why the removal of the spy plane, first reported by the CBC, had not been announced as had been the case when the aircraft were sent to the Middle East.

Trudeau repeatedly emphasized Thursday that Canada was respected within the alliance, and has always been recognized as one of the go-to partners. Regarding the appeal for additional help in Afghanistan, the prime minister said that Canada had provided funds to do development work and was happy to be supporting in other ways, but would not be sending any troops back to the country. Trudeau repeatedly emphasized Thursday that Canada was respected within the alliance, and has always been recognized as one of the go-to partners.

The one-day summit also revealed an extraordinary rift between the United Kingdom and the U.S., with London now refusing to share intelligence with Washington because of leaks concerning the investigation into a suicide bombing in Manchester on Monday that killed 22 people attending a pop concert. Trump responded to British anger over detailed stories in the U.S. media about the bombing by stating that the breaches were deeply troubling and a grave threat to our national security. After British Prime Minister Theresa May said that she had make clear to Trump the depth of British feeling about the release of highly classified information, the president said the U.S. cherished nothing more than the special relationship between the U.S. and the United Kingdom and vowed to get to the bottom of this. Unlike Britain, which has temporarily stopped sharing some intelligence with the U.S., Canada will continue doing so, Trudeau said. However, he refused to be drawn on whether he distrusted Trump with intelligence information. Perhaps because of Trump s reputation for retaliating against those who criticized him, Trudeau did not appear in Brussels to even want to mention the U.S. president by name.

The prime minister is to be in Sicily tomorrow where he and Trump will appear with other leaders at the annual two-day G7 summit the 2018 instalment of which, it was announced Thursday, will take place in Quebec s Charlevoix region.

Twitter: @mfisheroverseas[1]

References

  1. ^ @mfisheroverseas (twitter.com)
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